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LIBRARY OFXONGRESS. 

Chap.__.A..^opyright No. 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



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TRI^I> d^Njy TRU^, 



TENNESSEE 

MODEL HOUSEHOLD 

GUIDE. 



PRACTICAL HELP IN THE HOUSEHOLD. 



^ 



BY MOLLIE HUGGINS.^^^,, ,„,.^ 



1 



JAN 



Nashville, Tenn. : 

Publishing House Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

Barbee & Smith, Agents. 

1897. 



^VvJl i^^^ 



9250 



<,^x 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1897, 

By Mollie Huggins, 
In the Office of the Librarian of Congi-ess, at Washington. 



TO EVERY HOUSEHOLD, 

NORTH, EAST, SOUTH, AND WEST, THIS BOOK IS 

RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED, 

WITH BEST WISHES OF 

THE AUTHOR. 



NOTICE. 

A WORD of sincere thanks is extended to all those who have 
so kindly given me some of their favorite tested receipts. I 
have endeavored to make the " Model Household Guide " thor- 
oughly practical and economical, so that it will be a daily help 
to all who have it. As a favor I ask of you who have the book, 
and find it useful, to recommend it to others. 

MOLLIE HUGGINS. 



PREFACE. 

"She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth 
not the bread of idleness." (Pro v. xxxi. 27.) 

The natural desire to have everything in order, and to 
show that one is capable of keeping house as it should 
be kept, places the inexperienced in most awkward and 
unpleasant situations. She must of necessity do things 
the wrong way in order to learn what to avoid — what 
not to do as well as what to do, and in what order it 
must be done to prevent disorder and confusion. To 
make the work possible even in the smallest domestic 
enterprise, she has to learn by experience that each step 
must be taken in logical order. The first thing to do is 
to think out, as far as she can, every domestic under- 
taking before beginning it — as to what preparations are 
necessary, what the first thing to do, what the next, 
what the last, how much time it will take, what it will 
cost, etc. There are many tasks that are better and 
more easily done if due time for preparation is allowed. 
A rule that commends itself is to finish the work on 
hand without unnecessary diversion to other matters; 
do the most important thing first, have it finished and 
out of the way before beginning another. 

One thing at a time, and that done well, 
Is as good a rule as I can tell. 
But sometimes one is compelled to divide attention be- 

(5) 



6 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

tween several different projects and keep them all in 
running order at the same time. In getting up a meal 
one must attend to all the dishes to be served, no matter 
how many, except some that can be prepared before- 
hand. It is no small matter to serve a meal just as it 
should be done. It requires judgment, skill, and pa- 
tience. Do not let little mistakes and failures discour- 
age you; the best of cooks " spoil the broth " sometimes. 
Good housekeeping is a science as well as an art, and 
is well worthy the time, study, and practice one is com- 
pelled to give it in order to master it in all its details. 
May this book be a help and blessing to every household! 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Batter Cakes 119 

Biscuit 107 

Breads (Flour) 95 

Breads (Corn) 113 

Butter 92 

Cakes 176 

Candies 260 

Canned Fruits 250 

Catsups. 48 

Cheese 92 

Croquettes 125 

Desserts 222 

Diet for the Sick . . . 269 

Drinks 243 

Dumplings (Fruit). . . 165 

Eggs 86 

Fillings (for Cakes). 214 

Fish 15 

Fritters 173 

Health Rules 274 

Ices 236 

Icings 212 

Jellies (Gelatin). . . . 230 

Jellies (Fruit) 258 

Meats 25 

Milk 92 

For Index in full 



Page 

Oysters 20 

Pastry 132 

Pancakes 172 

Patties 129 

Pies 134 

Pickles 50 

Preserves 253 

Puddings 148 

Eemedies 275 

Rolls (Bread) 103 

EoLLS (Fruit) 164 

Salads 61 

Salted Almonds 235 

Sauces (for Meats) . . 43 
Sauces (for Puddings) 168 

Sandwiches. 130 

Shortcakes 174 

Soups 9 

Toasts 123 

Useful and Sugges- 
tive 280 

Vegetables 68 

Waffles 119 

Weights and Meas- 
ures (Cover) 3 



see pages 287-300. 



(7) 



SOUPS. 



THE basis of good soup is broth or stock, made 
by boiling cracked joints of beef, mutton, veal, 
etc., in about 1 quart of water. Have the water cold, 
let it come to a boil slowly, and boil a long time to ex- 
tract strength from meat. Skim well when it first 
boils up. If for clear soup, strain it. If you cannot 
get fresh meat, use beef extract and butter, a ver}^ 
good substitute, which can be had at all times. Use 
vegetables, cut fine; season with pepper, salt, and 
herbs if desired; also a little rice and broken maca- 
roni. Thickened soup requires more seasoning than 
thin soup. Soup is as good on second day as on first, 
if heated to boiling point. 

Coloring for Soups. 
To color soup brown use a little browned sugar, 
known as caramel; thicken with browned flour. To 
color soup green pound a handful of spinach in a 
mortar, put it in a cloth, and strain out the juice; add 
it to soup just before taking it up. Parsley and 
green celery leaves put in soup will also color it 
green. To color soup red skin 6 tomatoes, squeeze 
out the seed, cut the tomatoes fine, and add to soup, 
or only use juice as for spinach. Carrots grated and 
added to soup give it an amber color. For white 
soups, made of chicken, veal, or lamb, use only white 
vegetables, rice, and macaroni. 

(9) 



10 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Browned Flour. 
Put flour in a pan on top of stove, stir it constant- 
ly to keep it from burning until brown, put it in a 
box or fruit jar, and keep in a dry, cool place. This 
should always be kept for soups, gravies, sauces, etc. 

Croutons for Soup. 
Take thin slices of bread, butter them lightly, and 
cut into small squares; put in a pan, buttered side 
up, brown in a quick oven. Serve with soup. Used 
instead of crackers. 

Noodles for Soup. 
Beat 2 eggs light, add a pinch of salt and flour 
enough to make a very stiff dough, roll out very thin, 
and sprinkle it with flour. Let it stand one hour or 
more to dry, then roll it up into a tight roll, and, be- 
ginning at the end, slice in slips as thin as straws. 
After all are cut mix them lightly together, with a 
little flour to keep them from sticking, and drop 
them into soup just before dinner. Do not let boil 
too long, or they will come to pieces. 

Bouillon. 
Cut up the meat and break the bones of 6 pounds 
of beef and bone, add 3 quarts of cold water, let it 
simmer slowly four or five hours. Strain it and sea- 
son with pepper and salt; color brown if you like. 

Beef Soup. 

Select a small shank of beef, crack the bone, wash 

and place it in a kettle with 5 or 6 quarts of cold 

water, let boil, skim well when it first boils up, boil 

two hours, season with salt and pepper, and boil one 



SOUPS. 11 



hour longer. Then add vegetables desired, cut fine. 
When done remove bone and meat and thicken the 
soup with a little flour. Serve hot Use other 
meats the same way. 

Gumbo Soup (No. 1). 
Cut into small pieces 2 pounds of beef, J pound of 
ham, slice two quarts of okra^ and place them to- 
gether in a pot with 1 quart of cold water; let stew 
one hour. Then add 1 quart of sliced tomatoes and 
2 quarts or more of hoiling water. Boil three- 
fourths of an hour longer, skimming it often with a 
silver spoon. When the ingredients have boiled to 
pieces, season with 4 tablespoonfuls of butter, Cay- 
enne pepper and salt to taste. You can also use 
corn and a little minced onion in this soup if de- 
sired. Serve hot. 

Gumbo Soup (No 2). 
One fried chicken, 1 onion, parsley, 1 quart of okra 
cut up, 1 quart of skinned tomatoes, 1 pint of corn, 
a few celery leaves. IJ gallons, boil to J gallon. 
Pepper and salt to taste. Mrs. C. W. McG. 

Franklin, Tenn. 

Veal Soup. 
Put a joint of veal into 3 quarts of cold water, add 
1 tablespoonful of rice, a little salt, and let it boil 
slowly three or four hours. When the liquor is re- 
duced about one-half, remove from the fire. Mix 
yolk of 1 egg well with 1 cup of cream or milk, put it 
in tureen, add a small lump of butter, and strain the 
Jiot soup into this, stirring it well all the time for a 
few minutes. Serve hot. 



12 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Oyster Soup. 
Place in a double vessel 1 quart of milk, drain into 
this the liquor from 2 quarts of fresh oysters, and heat 
it slowly. When at boiling point, about five min- 
utes before serving, add 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, 
season with salt and pepper, then add the 2 quarts 
of fresh oysters, so that they will just have time to 
get good hot through. Stir in a few finely crushed 
crackers, and serve immediately very hot. It is a 
good idea to have soup plates heated. 

Chicken Soup. 

Cut up a chicken, boil it in 3 quarts of water until 
all nutriment is extracted, strain it, and put on stove 
again; add rice, macaroni, or noodles, and season 
with salt and pepper. Boil it until rice, macaroni, 
or noodles is done. If soup is not as thick as de- 
sired, thicken with a little flour mixed into thin 
paste with cold water. 

Tomato Soup (No. 1). 
Place in a kettle 1 quart of soup stock (or hot 
water), add 1 can of tomatoes, salt, a little red pep- 
per, 1 teaspoonful of sugar, if you like add 1 onion 
minced fine, and let boil ; rub together 1 tablespoon- 
ful of flour with 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, mix with 
a little of the hot soup, and stir into the boiling mix- 
ture. Strain it through a fine sieve. 

Tomato Soup (No. 2). 
Cook 1 can of tomatoes slowly until they can be 
strained, put a pinch of soda and salt into 1 quart of 
milk, let it come to a boil, season with pepper, and 



SOUPS. 13 



butter size of an egg, and then add the strained to- 
matoes. Put in a few crushed cracker crumbs just 
before serving. Serve hot. 

Corn and Tomato Soup. 

Six ears of corn shaved off and scraped, 6 ripe to- 
matoes peeled and cut fine; place in a stew kettle, 
add 1 quart of water, salt and pepper to taste. Boil 
twenty minutes, then add 1 tablespoonful of butter, 
1 tablespoonful of corn starch mixed with a little 
cold water; let it boil two minutes, pour in gradually 
1 quart of sweet milk, stir it constantly until it boils 
up once, and serve. You can use canned corn and 
tomatoes in winter season. Mrs. J. J. Fleming. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Potato Soup. 

Boil and mash 6 potatoes, mix with ^ cup of but- 
ter; put in a kettle 1 quart of milk, let boil, stir in 
the potatoes, strain it, and heat again; season with 
salt and pepper. Beat 1 egg, place it in tureen, and 
pour the hot soup over it, stirring it all the time. 
Boil sliced onion with the potatoes if you want the 
onion flavor. 

Bean Soup. 

Soak 1 quart of dried beans overnight in lukewarm 
water, put them on next morning with 2 pounds of 
salt pork and 3 quarts of water, let boil slowly three 
hours. Strain it through a colander, heat again, 
season with salt and pepper. You can use butter to 
season instead of salt pork if you prefer it. 



14 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Green Pea Soup. 
Boil 2 quarts of water (or broth), add 1 quart of 
shelled peas, boil twenty minutes, add J teaspoonful 
of sugar, boil twenty minutes longer, stir in 1 table- 
spoonful of butter; salt and pepper. Strain it and 
send to table with croutons floating on top. 

Celery Soup. 
Out into small pieces 4 or 5 heads of celery, boil it 
in 2 quarts of water (or soup stock) until tender, 
strain it through a sieve, heat again, rub together 1 
teaspoonful of flour and 1 tablespoonful of butter, 
mix with 1 cup of heated cream or milk, and add it 
to the hot soup, stirring in with great care; let it get 
hot, but not boil. Thicken with a little more flour if 
you like. Serve with toasted bread. 

Noodle Soup. 
Boil a fat hen or piece of beef, break 2 eggs into 
flour enough to make a stiff dough, roll it very thin, 
let dry for a few minutes, roll it up tightly, cut in 
shreds, and sprinkle them in the soup. 

Mrs. Robert Purdy. 

Henderson, Tenn. 



FISH. 



THE usual way for cooking fish is boiling, steam- 
ing, baking, frying, and broiling. They should 
be thoroughly cleaned, washed in cold water, and 
placed on ice or in a cool place until ready to cook. 
Large fish are generally boiled or cut up and fried ; 
medium size, baked, boiled, or steamed; smaller 
kind, fried or broiled. 

Sauce for Fish. 

Place in a saucepan 1 cup of milk or water (or 
half and half mixed), heat it, and stir in carefully 2 
tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed with 1 tablespoon 
ful of flour; as this thickens stir in beaten yolks of 
4 eggs or 2 eggs well beaten, and season with salt 
and pepper. Also season with either of the follow- 
ing: Parsley, celery, vinegar, chopped pickles, nas- 
turtium seed, or lemon juice, or use without if you 
prefer. 

Stuffing fob Fish. 

Make a dressing of bread crumbs, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of minced onion, 1 tablespoonful of butter, a lit- 
tle chopped parsley, 1 beaten egg, pepper, and salt. 

Boiled Fish (No. 1). 
Lay the fish in cold water, slightly salted, one- 
half hour before cooking; wipe it dry and stuff it (or 
not, as you like), sew or tie it up firmly in a floured 
cloth, place a small plate in bottom of kettle, put the 
fish in, fill the kettle nearly full of cold water, and 

(15) 



16 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

add a little salt; boil one-fourth hour to a pound. 
When done unwrap the fish carefully, place it upon 
a dish, being careful not to break it. Have ready 1 
cup of drawn butter or fish sauce, very rich, sea- 
soned with juice of 1 lemon and a little minced pars- 
ley, and pour one-half of it over the fish. Serve the 
other from sauce boat. Garnish with sliced ^gg 
and parsley. 

Boiled Fish (No. 2). 
Wash the fish carefully, rub it with salt, and 
wrap it in a strong cloth and boil, allowing fifteen 
minutes to each pound for cooking. When done 
take it out of cloth carefully, so as not to break it, 
and place on a heated dish. Serve at once with 
dressing made of the yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, J 
cup of melted butter, J cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of 
vinegar, J tea spoonful of mixed mustard, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of sugar, | teaspoonful of salt. Boil two or three 
minutes. Mrs. W. R. Bryan. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Steamed Fish. 
Prepare as for boiled fish; place on a plate in 
steamer over cold water, and let come to a boil slow- 
ly. Cook longer than when boiled. Garnish and 
use same sauce as for boiled fish. 

Baked Fish. 
Wash the fish, wipe it dry, and rub it with pepper 
and salt; some add a little Cayenne and powdered 
mace. Stuff the fish (if desired) with mixed dress- 
ing, then lay it upon a grating over baking pan or on 
perforated tin in bottom of pan. Pour over it a little 



FISH. 17 

butter and water, bake as jou would a fowl, basting 
freely w ith butter and toward the last with its own 
drippings. Do not let it brown too fast. When 
done place it upon a hot dish and garnish with bits 
of celery top, parsley, and slices of lemon. Cover 
the dish closely. Add to the gravy in the pan 1 ta- 
blespoonful of tomato catsup, 1 tablespoonful of 
flour (browned if you wish) which has been wet with 
cold w^ater, and juice of 1 lemon; let boil up, and 
serve from sauce boat, or serve with cream sauce, 
as made for boiled fish. 

Fried Fish. 

Cut the fish into slices of convenient size (if small 
fish, fry whole), wash it in cold water, wipe dry, and 
rub on salt, black pepper, and Cayenne. Roll it in 
meal or fine bread crumbs, and fry it in hoiling hot 
lard. Cover. When first side is good brown turn 
and brown the other side same as first. Some dip 
fish in beaten egg before rolling it in crumbs or 
meal. 

Broiled Fish. 

Wash, wipe, and split the fish so that you can lay 
it fiat on the gridiron ; sprinkle it with salt and pep- 
per and lay it on buttered gridiron with flesh side 
downward. When the lower side is brown turn the 
fish. When done serve upon a hot dish. Lay a 
piece of butter on each fish or have ready a mixture 
of 2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of lemon juice, a little salt and pepper, and pour 
it over the hot fish. Serve hot. 
2 



18 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



Fish Balls. 
Codfish is best, when convenient; if not, use any 
kind of nice fish. Wash and soak it, cut in pieces, 
boil twenty minutes, turn off the water, put on more 
water from teakettle, boil until done, and place upon 
a dish to cool. When cold pick out all bones and 
skin and mince very fine. Boil some Irisli potatoes, 
mash them into a stiff batter, with a lump of butter, 
sweet milk, and 1 beaten egg, and seas(m with salt 
and pepper. Mix minced fish with equal portion of 
batter, flour your hands, and form the mixture into 
balls or cakes, drop them into boiling lard, and fry 
brown. Serve hot. These can be served for break- 
fast by preparing the balls the day before, and you 
have only to fry them; or you can use desiccated 
fish put up in boxes; it is already cooked and pre- 
pared. With this fish balls can be made in a short 
time. 

Fish Omelet. 

Mince some ready-cooked fish, season it with Cay- 
enne and salt, mix with it 6 or 7 well-beaten eggs, 1 
tablei^poonful of cream or milk. Pour it into a hot 
buttered frying pan over fire, fry only on one side, 
fold it over, and serve hot. 

Fish Fritters. 

Mince ready-cooked fish and stir into batter made 
of 1 pint of milk, 4 eggs well beaten, a pinch of salt, 
1 heaped teaspoonful of baking jrowder, in flour 
enough to make batter thicker than for battercakes. 
Fry in spoonfuls in boiling hot lard like any fritters. 
Serve hot. 



FISH. 19 



Salmon Loaf. 
Drain off liquor from 2 cans of salmon, mix with it 
3 well-beaten eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls of melted but- 
ter, 2 cups of bread crumbs, and a little salt and pep- 
per. Put it in a buttered mold or pan, set it in a pan 
of boiling water inside of stove, and let it steam one 
hour, filling the pan with water as it boils away. 
Set it in cold water a minute and turn it into a dish. 
Serve with sauce for salmon loaf. 

Mrs. Frank Overton Watts. 

Union City, Tenn. 

Salmon Bake. 
One large can of salmon carefully picked into 
small pieces, 1 quart of milk heated to boiling point ; 
into this put ten cents' worth of crackers that have 
been pulverized, making the pap about the consist- 
ency of mush. When almost cool stir into this J 
pound of butter, fill baking dish with alternate lay- 
ers of the pap and the salmon, commencing and end- 
ing with the pap. Bake only until thoroughly hot, 
as none of the ingredients are raw. Be sure and not 
cook till dry. Mrs. S. A. O. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



OYSTERS. 

©YSTERS are in season from September to May, 
so do not use fresh oysters in the months that 
have no '^r" in them. Some people use cove oysters 
at any time of the year. Oysters must be fresh and 
fat to be good. Use large ones for frying; smaller 
ones can be used for stews, pies, fritters, etc. 

Fried Oysters. 
Select for frying the largest and best oysters you 
can find. Take them carefully from the liquor, lay 
them in rows upon a clean cloth, and press another 
cloth lightly upon them to absorb the moisture. 
Beat 2 or 3 eggs, and in another dish have some fine- 
ly crushed cracker crumbs. Heat enough butter, or 
lard and butter mixed, to cover the oysters in a fry- 
ing pan, season the oysters with pepper and salt, and 
dip each one in beaten egg and into cracker crumbs, 
rolling it over until entirely covered with a thick 
coating. Drop them carefully into the hot grease 
and fry quickly a delicate brown ; do not let them lie 
an instant in frying pan after they are done. Place 
them on a hot dish and serve dry, crisp, and hot. 
Some prefer to roll oysters in meal or batter, but 
they are more crisp with egg and cracker crumbs. 

Stewed Oysters. 
Drain the liquor from 2 quarts of firm, plump 
oysters, mix with it 1 small cup of hot water, add 
salt and pepper, and pour into a saucepan set over 
(20) 



OYSTERS. 21 



fire. When it comes to a boil have ready 1 large 
cup of cream or rich milk heated by setting it in an- 
other vessel of hot water, add it to liquor, stirring it 
all the time. Let it get hot, season with salt and 
pepper, and 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, as soon as it 
is melted and stirred in, put in the oysters, boil from 
three to five minutes, just long enough to ruffle the 
oysters, stir in a few crisp cracker crumbs, and serve 
immediately. Can use all milk, without the water, 
or cream. 

Oyster Fritters. 
Drain liquor from oysters, to 1 cup of this add i 
cup of milk, 3 or 4 well-beaten eggs, a little salt, and 
flour enough to make a thin batter. Chop the oys- 
ters or cut in halves, stir them into the batter, and 
fry in hot lard or butter and lard mixed; drop the 
oyster batter in by tablespoonfuls, fry a nice brown 
on both sides, and serve hot. Or have batter thick- 
er and leave oysters whole, envelcp each oyster in 
batter, and fry them brown. 

Steamed Oysters. 
Drain 1 quart or more of nice oysters, place them 
in a pan in a steamer over hoiling water, cover and 
steam just long enough to get good hot and ruffle 
edges of oysters. Place in a heated dish with but- 
ter, pepper, and salt, and serve hot. Or get oysters 
in shells, wash the shells thoroughly, lay them in 
steamer with the large side of shell downward, place 
over hoiUng water, steam fifteen or tw^enty mijiutes, 
or until shells open. Season with salt, pepper, and 
bits of butter; be quick about it, and serve on shells 
very hot 



22 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Broiled Oysters. 

Select 1 quart large, fat oysters, wipe them dry, 
dip each one into melted butter seasoned with salt, 
and Cayenne, and broil them on a wire gridiron made 
for the purpose; broil quickly from three to five min- 
utes. Place in a hot dish, put a bit of butter on each 
oyster, and serve hot. Or select large oysters in 
shells, wash the shells, wipe them, and place on a 
griddle with the large, deep side of shell down to 
catch the juices. Broil over coals or lay them on top 
of stove until shells open; remove top of shells, being 
careful to retain all juice in lower shells, and place 
them, shells and all, in a hot dish. Let each person 
season them to taste. 

Panned Oysters. 
Cut some stale bread in thin slices, round the in- 
side of slices (leaving off the crust) to fit pattypans, 
toast a nice brown, butter each piece and place in the 
pattypans, moisten them with a little oyster liquor, 
place on the toast a layer of oysters, and season with 
salt and pepper and a bit of butter on top of each 
pan. Place all in a baking pan, cover, and set the 
pan in a hot oven eight or ten minutes. Serve hot 
in pattypans. Or melt a large lump of butter in a 
frying pan, without allowing it to brown, throw in 
the oysters, shake and stir them until they are suffi- 
ciently cooked, lay them on slices of hot toast ar- 
ranged in a dish beforehand, and serve at once. 

Scalloped Oysters. 
Butter a pudding dish, put in a layer of cracker 
crumbs, moisten it with oyster liquor and milk; next 



orsTEHS. 23 



a layer of oysters, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and bits 
of butter, then another layer of crumbs, and so on 
until dish is full. Let the top layer be crumbs; beat 
an egg into the milk you pour over them, stick bits 
of butter over it, cover, and set it in the oven half an 
hour, brown lightly. 

Oyster Pie. 
Butter a deep pie plate, line it with puff paste or 
pie crust, fill it with oysters, and season with salt, 
pepper, and butter, a little cream or milk. Cover it 
with pastry and stick it with a fork; bake in a hot 
oven fifteen or twenty minutes until nicely brown. 

Oyster Ragout. 
Chop oysters thoroughly (about 3 dozen will fill 

1 dozen shells), mince 1 small onion very fine and 
add to the oysters, with about as much bread crumbs 
as oysters, 1 large tablespoonful of butter, yolks of 

2 raw eggs, boiled yolks of 2 more eggs, a little lemon 
juice, little nutmeg, and pepper and salt to taste. 
Put the mixture on the stove and stir it until it is 
thoroughly heated, then fill the shells, grate bread 
crumbs over the top of each, and bake J an hour. 
Serve on the shells. You can use little individual 
dishes made for the purpose instead of the shells. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. THOMPSON ANDERSON. 

Creamed Oysters (No. 1). 
Boil 1 pint of sweet milk, add 1 tablespoonful of 
butter with IJ tablespoonfuls of flour rubbed to a 
cream; when it thickens add a salt spoon of salt, a 
dash of black pepper, 1 quart of oysters, and cook 
five minutes. Mrs. Phillip Hill. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



^ TENNJESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Creamed Oysters (No. 2). 
To 1 quart of oysters, 

4 tablespoonfuls of butter, 
4 tablespoonfuls of flour. 
Heat the butter and slowly stir the flour into it; 
meanwhile heat the oysters somewhat in their liq- 
uor, just until they curl up slightly, then drain them. 
Add the oyster liquor to milk so as to make about 1 
quart of mixture, heat this mixture, and slowly pour 
into it the butter, etc., stirring it vigorously all the 
time. Turn oysters into it and cover with bread or 
cracker crumbs, and put into stove and brown. 

Miss Sallie McClelland. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Oyster Bake. 
Butter a deep pie plate or baking dish, fill it with 
alternate layers of cracker crumbs and oysters, sea- 
son each layer of oysters with salt, pepper, and bits 
of butter; let the last layer be of cracker crumbs. 
Pour enough sweet milk over it to moisten it well. 
Bake in a hot oven fifteen or twenty minutes. Serve 
hot. 



MEATS. 



IN roastiDg meat allow about twenty minutes to the 
pound, according to the thickness of roast. The 
oven should be Jiot when the roast is put in to crisp 
the surface quickly and retain juices. Boiled fresh 
meats should be put into boiling water to set the 
juice. Cold water should only be used for soup and 
salt meats, as it extracts the flavor. Strongly salt- 
ed meats should be soaked overnight in cold w^ater. 
Salt should not be applied to broiling steak, as it ex- 
tracts juices; season after broiling. If meat is 
tough, soak it in vinegar water a little Avhile or put 
a little vinegar in the water in which it is boiled. 
Poultry should never be eaten in less than five or 
six hours after it is killed. Frying may be done in 
two ways : by using 1 ounce or more of lard, butter, 
or beef drippings in a frying pan, when it is at holl- 
ing point place in the article, cooking both sides 
brown; or by completely covering the article in hot 
lard, like frying doughnuts. 

Browned Flour for Gravies. 
Spread flour upon tin plates set on the stove, stir 
it all the time until it is brown through; out it into 
a glass jar covered closely, shake it up every few 
days to keep it from lumping. It is excellent for 
coloring and thickening many dishes. Make it at 
odd times and keep it on hand all the time. 

(25) 



26 TENNi:SSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Browned Butter. 
Put a lump of butter into a hot frying pan, toss it 
around over the fire until it is brown, stir browned 
flour into it until it is smooth and begins to boil. 
Use it for coloring gravies and sauces for meats. 
Mixed with celery or onion vinegar it makes a nice 
sauce for baked fish. 

Corned Beef. 
Rub each piece of beef well with salt, mixed with 
one-tenth part of saltpeter, until the salt lies dry 
upon the surface. Let stand twenty-four hours in 
a cold place, and repeat the process, rubbing in the 
mixture thoroughly; let stand until the next day. 
Have ready a brine made of 5 gallons of water, 1 
gallon of salt, 4 ounces of saltpeter, IJ pounds of 
brown sugar, and boil the brine ten minutes; let it 
get good cold. Wipe the beef dry, place it in a ves- 
sel, and pour the brine over it. Examine it from 
time to time. If it is not keeping well, take out the 
meat without delay; wipe it and rub in dry salt 
until you can prepare new, stronger brine. The beef 
should be washed well in 3 or 4 waters, removing all 
salt before cooking. Put on cold water enough to 
cover it; in boiling allow twenty minutes to the 
pound ; turn the meat three or four times while cook- 
ing. When done drain very dry and serve with 
drawn butter in a gravy boat. 

Spiced Round. 
For a round of beef weighing 24 pounds take J 
pound of brown sugar, J pound of saltpeter, 2 pounds 
of salt, 1 ounce of cloves, 1 ounce of allspice, J ounce 



MEATS. 27 



of mace; pulverizing these materials, mix them well 
together and rub them in the beef thoroughly. Let 
the beef lie for eight or ten days in the pickle thus 
made, turn and rub it every day, then tie it around 
with tape to keep it in shape, make a thick paste of 
flour and water, lay a little suet finely chopped over 
and under the beef, cover the round entirely with 
the paste, and bake it six hours. When you take 
the beef from the oven remove the paste, but let the 
tape stay until you are ready to send to the table. 
If you wish to serve the beef cold, keep it well cov- 
ered, so that it will retain its moisture. If you pre- 
fer, you can tie it in a cloth and boil it until done. 
The spiced round is for winter use, as it is only pre- 
pared in cold weather. 

Roast Beef. 
Take a roast of 7 or 8 pounds, salt and pepper it, 
place it in roasting pan, cut up bits of suet or butter 
over it, and pour over it 1 cup of hot water to pre- 
vent burning until suet is melted. Place it in a hot 
oven, baste often, and let cook about two hours. 
Place tlie roast on a heated dish where it will keep 
hot, skim off the fat beef drippings, add 1 table 
spoonful of browned flour, pour in 1 cup of boiling 
water, and let it boil up, serve in a gravy boat. 
Roast other meats the same way. 

Broiled Beefsteak. 
Out tender steak f inch thick; if the meat is not 
tender, chop or beat the steak from one end to the 
other; lay it on a buttered gridiron over clear coals, 
turn it as often as it begins to drip; or put it on the 
bottom of nMt greased frying pan, turning it often. 



28 tenn£!ssi:e model household guide. 

Do not seaBon until it is done, which will be in about 
ten or twelve minutes. Salt and pepper both sides, 
lay it in a hot dish, put butter over it, cover it, and 
let it stand five minutes to draw juices to surface 
before it is eaten. Broil other meat steaks the same 
way. 

Smothered Steak. 

Beat steak well, put a little butter in a hot frying 
pan, lay in the steak, sprinkle it with salt, pepper, 
flour, and bits of butter, set it in the oven until nice- 
ly browned, place on a heated dish, add a little flour 
and water to the gravy, let it boil up, pour it over 
the steak, and serve. 

Beefsteak and Onions. 
Prepare steak as above, have ready 5 or 6 onions 
sliced in a frying pan with a little butter, stir them 
until they begin to bTown, dish the steak, and lay 
'the onions on top. Cover, and let stand a few min- 
utes. Serve hot. 

Fried Steak. 

Beat the steak, salt, pepper, and dredge it with 
'flour, fry it in hot lard; when nicely brown on one 
side turn the other and brown it. When done place 
it on a hot dish. Add to the gravy a little flour and 
water, let it boil up, pour it over the steak, and 
serve. 

Fried Steak and Onions. 

Prepare as for fried steak; when placed in the fry- 
ing pan put sliced onions over the top, and cook as 
fried steak. When done place the steak on a dish, 
laying the onions on top. 



MEATS, 29 



Fried Steak and Tomatoes. 

Cut several tomatoes in small pieces and season 
with salt and red pepper. When the steak is about 
half done put the tomatoes over the steak and finish 
cooking. Lady Love. 

Nashville, Tenu. 

Dressed Steak. 

Prepare dressing as for turkey or chicken, take a 
round steak, beat it, spread the dressing over it, 
sprinkle it with a little salt, pepper, and bits of 
butter, lap over the ends, roll the steak up tightly, 
and tie closely. Spread a large spoonful of butter 
over the steak and place it in a roasting pan with a 
little water. Bake about one-half hour, basting it 
often. When done place it on a dish, make a brown 
gravy and pour over it. Serve hot, cutting cross- 
wise in slices through the beef and dressing. 

Beep Tongue. 

Wash well, and, if salt tongue, let it soak over- 
night in cold water; next morning put it into a pot 
with plenty of cold water, let boil slowly until it is 
tender through. When cold skin and cut it in round 
slices and serve. 

Beef Hash. 
Cut fine cold roast beef, cut fine 1 or 2 Irish pota- 
toes, put into a stewpan with a lump of butter, sea- 
son well with salt and pepper, add beef gravy or 
water, and cook slowly, stirring it now and then. 
When done, if too watery, sprinkle in a little flour to 
thicken it. If you like onion flavor, add 1 onion 



30 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

minced when liasli is first put on to cook. Make 
other meat hash the same way. 

Baked Hash. 

Chop the meat very fine; add a little water; sea- 
son it with salt, pepper, butter, minced onion, and 
parsley; add some bread crumbs and ^ cup of milk 
with 1 beaten egg in it. Put into a buttered pan, 
grate some bread crumbs over the top, and bake till 
brown. 

Beef Loaf. 

Grind in a sausage mill 5 or 6 pounds of good 
beef, season it to taste with salt and pepper and a 
little chopped onion. Press it into shape and bake 
it as you do a roast. Mrs. W. R. Bryan. 

Nashville, Teim. 

Hot Tamales. 
Make a stiff mush of plain meal, 1 pound can of 
beef boiled in salt water until done enough to chop 
fine, 1 teaspoonf ul of chopped garlic, 3 or 4 tomatoes, 
2 pods of red pepper boiled until you can scrape the 
inside out for use, using a little seed and tea to 
taste. Put a skillet on the stove and fry all to- 
gether with lard eight or ten minutes. Wash 
shucks and let stand in boiling water during the 
time you are preparing the hash. Line the middle 
of shuck with the mush, smooth it with the hand, 
and put in some hash ; roll it up and tie both ends of 
the shuck, put it in a steamer over boiling water, 
and boil 1 hour. By preparing the mush before- 
hand you can handle it better stiff and cold. This 
is splendid. Mrs. W. H. Bumpas. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



MEATS. 31 



Roast Mutton. 
Select young, tender mutton or lamb, prepare it 
as for beef roast, allowing fifteen or twenty minutes 
to the pound to roast done. 

Fried Mutton Chops. 

Sprinkle each chop with salt and pepper, dip it in 
flour or cracker crumbs and beaten egg. Fry it in 
hot lard a nice brown on both sides. Serve hot and 
dry or make gravy. Use tomato sauce. 

Roast Veal. 

Veal requires a longer time to cook than mutton 
or lamb. Heat it gradually, baste frequently, and 
when done skim the gravy, add a little flour and 
water, and let it boil up, serve in gravy boat. 

Veal Cutlets. 

Sprinkle them with salt and pepper, roll each one 
in cracker crumbs, fry in hot lard, make eravy, and 
serve. Or you can rub the cutlets in melted butter, 
pepper them, and broil like beefsteak. 

Fried Liver. 

Slice the liver and let it stand in salt water to 
draw out the blood; have a pan hot, put in 2 or 3 
slices of middling and a little lard, and melt it to 
frying heat. Sprinkle each slice of liver with salt 
and pepper, dredge it with flour, and place it in the 
hot grease, fry brown, and dish the liver. Make 
gravy, pour it over the liver, and serve. 



32 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Stewed Tripe. 

After the tripe has been well boiled cut it into 
small strii^s, boil some rich sweet milk, add butter, 
pepijer, and salt, put the tripe into the milk, and let 
it get good hot through, and serve. A nice break- 
fast dish for those who are fond of tripe. 

Fried Tripe. 
After it is well cleaned boil it in water until it is 
tender, cut it into small squares, dip it in beaten e^^^ 
seasoned with salt and pepper, roll it in cracker 
crumbs, and fry a light brown in hot lard. Serve 
with onion sauce. 

Roast Pork. 
Cut in deep squares or parallel lines running from 
side to side. Season highly, and put to roast with a 
little water in the pan. Heat it gradually ; when the 
fat begins to ooze out of the roast quicken the fire. 
Baste it often with its own gravy. When thorough- 
ly done take it up, skim the gravy, and thicken it 
with browned flour, and add 1 cup of boiling water 
and juice of 1 lemon, or a little vinegar if liked, and 
serve in gravy boat. 

Pork Steak. 
Broil or fry as you would beefsteak, only cooking 
it longer. 

Pork Chops. 
Prepare as for mutton chops, cooking them thor- 
oughly done. 

Roast Sparerib. 
Trim off the rough ends, crack the ribs across, rub 
them with salt and sprinkle with pepper, put into a 



MEATS. 



pan with 2 cuj)s of water, set it in oven, baste fre- 
quently, and turn it over so as to bake botli side* 
brown. When done place in a dish, pour the gravy 
over them, and serve. 

Sausage. 

Grind in a sausage mill 6 pounds of fresh, lean 
pork, 3 pounds of fresh, fat pork, season it highly 
with salt, black pepper, Cayenne, and powdered 
sage, working it in with the hands. Make into 
small cakes and fry as many at a time as you want. 
Their own grease will fry them. Fry brown, but 
not hard. Serve them dry and hot, or make gravy 
if you prefer it. 

Brains. 

Take hog or calf brains, skin and wash them well, 
and let them stand in salt water awhile. Put on in 
water with a little salt to boil, cook until tender 
enough to mash, and drain off the water; have ready 
3 or 4 beaten eggs, stir these into the brains, cook 
about two or three minutes, stirring it all the time, 
add a little lump of butter, and serve. Be careful 
not to let cook too long, as it will harden both eggs 
and brains and make them watery. A very fine dish 
when prepared in this way. 

Pigs' Feet. 

Clean the feet well, boil them 1 day in clear water 
with a little salt, until they are done and tender. 
After they are cold split them open, dip them in bat- 
ter, and fry brown in hot lard. 
3 



34 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Boiled Ham. 
Wash the ham nicely, soak it in cold water 1 
hour or all night, wash it again, put on in plenty of 
cold water, and let come to a boil slowly. Do not 
boil it too fast; allow twenty minutes to the pound 
after it begins to boil. Unless it is to be served hot 
do not skin it until cold. Garnish as you like. 

Steamed Ham. 

Prepare as for boiled ham, place in steamer, cover 
and set it over boiling water, and steam until thor- 
oughly done. When cold skin it and serve it as 
boiled ham. 

Baked Ham. 

Soak the ham over night, trim nicely, cover it with 
thick paste made of flour and water, place it in 
roasting pan with a little water to keep it from 
burning, cover, baste now and then to keep the paste 
from cracking. Cook until done, allowing twenty- 
five minutes to the pound. When done peel off the 
paste and skin. 

Dressed Ham, 

Put the ham to soak in cold water the night be- 
fore you wish to cook it. Kext morning make deep 
incisions all over the ham, commencing at the hock 
crossways. Make a stuffing of light bread, 1 egg, a 
little butter seasoned well with onions, pepper, salt, 
spices, and sweet herbs of any kind. Mix together 
and stuff as much as possible into the incisions, then 
sew the ham up in a cloth and boil or steam it until 
done. Skin it, make a batter of flour and water, 
and pour over it, and put into oven to brown. Or 
boil ham until done, skin, and make incisions about 



MEATS. 35 



1 inch apart, deep as possible, and stuff; spread over 
the top the yolk of 1 egg and light bread crumbs, and 
bake brown. 

Broiled Ham (Xo. 1). 
Cut slices of ham J of an inch thick, place them in 
hot water half an hour, then lay them on a gridiron 
over bright coals, brown both sides, place on a hot 
dish, butter freely, pepper, and serve. Or, after 
scalding, wipe them dry, dip in beaten egg, then into 
rolled crackers, and fry or broil. 

Florence Crox. 

Benton, Tenn. 

Broiled Ham (No. 2). 
Cut ham in thin slices, trim, soak it in cold water, 
wipe it dry, and broil over a brisk fire, turning slices 
constantly. It will require about five minutes to 
cook it. Place on a heated dish with a little butter 
and sprinkle of pepper on each slice. Serve at once. 

Fried Ham. 
Slice, trim, and fry in hot frying pan, turn it often 
until done and hroicn, place the ham on a dish, pour 
into hot frying pan with the gravy a little water, and 
shake it around to get browned ham off the pan; 
this makes red ham gravy. Pour it over the ham 
and serve. If you like, you can thicken the gravy 
with a little browned flour. Or cut in thick slices 
some cold boiled ham, dip in beaten egg, roll them 
in crumbs, and fry in hot butter or a little lard. 

Dressing for Fowls. 
Take bread crumbs, moisten them with milk or 
cold water, add butter, pepper, salt, and, if you like, 



36 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

beaten jolks of 2 eggs, and mix well. Or use egg 
bread (made of meal) crumbs, mix about half and 
half with flour bread crumbs, and proceed as above. 
This is for plain dressing; you can add minced onion, 
sage, chopped oysters, or minced sausage, just as 
Tou prefer. 

Roast Turkey. 
Select a young turkey, have it dressed nicely, salt, 
and let stand at least seven or eight hours (or more} 
before roasting it. When ready to roast wash it in 
several waters, then wash it inside and out thor- 
oughly with a little soda in the water, rinse it well, 
and wipe it dry inside and out with a clean cloth. 
Rub a little salt on inside, stuff it with dressing (any 
kind preferred), tie the legs and wings to the body, 
season a little butter with pepper and salt, rub it 
over the turkey, and dredge it with a little flour. 
Place it in a roasting pan with a perforated piece in 
the bottom, pour in a cup of hot water, cover, let 
bake slowly, baste often, and turn so that it will 
brown nicely. When you put the turkey in to roast 
stew the giblets in enough water to cover them until 
quite tender. When turkey is done and lifted from 
the pan skim fat off of gravy, and add giblets cut 
fine with the water they were boiled in to the gravy. 
Thicken it with browned flour wet with cold water, 
boil up once, and pour into gravy boat. Garnish 
turkey with parsley, or any way desired, and serve 
with cranberry sauce. Roast other fowls the same 

way. 

Boiled Turkey. 

Prepare as you would for roasting, fill it with 
oyster dressing, wet a thin cloth, dredge it with 



MS ATS. 37 



flour, baste the turkey up in it, fitting it closely. 
Boil slowly, allowing about fifteen minutes to the 
pound. Serve with oyster sauce. 

Turkey Steak. 

Slice breast of cold roasted turkey, dip it in beat- 
en egg seasoned with pepper and salt, and cracker 
crumbs, and fry it in hot butter a nice light brown. 

Turkey Scallop. 

Pick the meat from cold turkey and cut it fine; 
put into a buttered pan a layer of bread crumbs, 
moisten it with milk, add a layer of turkey with 
some of the dressing, sprinkle it with salt, pepper, 
and bits of butter; add another layer of crumbs, 
turkey, and so on until the pan is nearly full. If 
you have gravy left from turkey, add a little hot 
water and pour over it ; if not, use milk or water to 
moisten. Then beat 2 eggs and mix with cracker 
crumbs and milk, and have it thick enough to spread; 
add a little salt and spread it over the top of scalloj), 
and stick bits of butter over it; cover it with a pie 
plate, bake IJ hours, or until the contents begin to 
bubble, and remove the cover and let it brown. 
Cold chicken can be prepared the same way, 

Turkey Hash. 

Cut cold turkey into pieces about the same size, 
add turkey gravy if you have it, if not, add water 
and a lump of butter, and season with salt and pep- 
per. Boil up good, thicken with a little dressing or 
flour, and serve hot. 



B8 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Roast Chicken. 
Prepare and serve just as you do roast turkey. 

Boiled Chicken. 
Prepare and stuff the chicken as for roasting, 
baste a floured cloth around it, put it in a pot witli 
enough hot water to cover it well. Boil slowly first 
half hour; boil one hour or more according to size 
and toughness. Serve with sauce preferred. 

Fried Chicken. 

Clean, wash, and cut to pieces young, tender 
chickens, let stand in salt water one hour or more, 
wipe it dry, season it with salt and pepper, dredge 
with flour, or dip in beaten eggs and then in cracker 
crumbs. Fry in hot butter and lard mixed until a 
nice brown. Place on a dish, add 1 tablespoonful 
of flour to gravy, make it smooth, add 1 cup of cream, 
or milk, season with salt and pepper, let boil up, 
pour it over the chicken or serve from a gravy boat. 
Serve hot. If chicken is large or tough, steam it be- 
fore frying. 

Broiled Chicken. 

Take young, tender chickens, split them open in the 
back, lay them in salt water 1 hour, wipe them dry, 
lay them on the broiler, inside first to the fire, and 
baste with melted butter, salt, and pepper. When 
they are brown on one side turn them and baste and 
brown the other side. When done place on a hot 
dish, baste well with butter and a little hot water 
and serve. If chicken is tough, steam it awhile be- 
fore broiling it. 



MEATS. 39 



Chicken Pie. 
Cut chicken as for fiying, boil it tender in water 
enough to cover it, season it with salt and pepper, 
rub a little flour into 1 tablespoonful of butter, and 
thicken with this. Line a baking dish with pastry, 
lay the chicken in nicely, if desired add a few slices of 
cold boiled egg, and pour over it the liquor or gravy 
it was boiled in. Cover it with pastry and bake 
about three-quarters of an hour. 

Dumplings for Stews. 
Sift together 2 cups of flour, 1 teaspoonful of 
baking powder, J teaspoonful of salt, and mix into a 
stiff dough with 1 egg well beaten and ^ cup of cold 
water; use more water if needed. Roll it as thin as 
pie crust, cut into small squares or strips, flour 
them, drop them in on top of the boiling stew, and 
cook twenty minutes without disturbing. You can 
use biscuit dough made without shortening foj 
dumplings. 

Stewed Chicken. 
Cut up a large chicken, cover it with cold water, 
let it heat slowly and boil until tender, and season 
with salt and pepper, also with butter if chicken is 
not fat. Have ready dumplings, drop them in on 
top of the boiling stew, and let boil until they are 
done. Broken macaroni is a fine substitute for 
dumplings; used once, you will always prefer it. 
Beef stew can be made the same way, using small 
rib pieces, adding a few peeled, medium-sized Irish 
potatoes before dropping in the dumplings or mac- 
aroni. 



40 mJSfNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Smothered Chicken. 

Split young chickens down the back or cut them 
in pieces and let stand in cold water awhile. Drain 
and season them with salt and pepper, dredge with 
flour, put into a roasting pan, dot with bits of but- 
ter, and nearly cover them with water; cover and 
bake them until tender. When done take from the 
pan and make gravy. 

Jellied Chicken. 

Boil the chicken until the meat will drop from the 
bones, let it cool, cut the chicken fine, stir it into 1 
quart of the water that it was boiled in, and season 
with salt, pepper, and a little butter. Dissolve J 
box of gelatin and mix with it, pour into a wet mold, 
and after it has hardened turn it out and serve in 
slices. 

Barbecue. 

To barbecue meat prepare as for a roast. While 
it is cooking have in a cup melted butter seasoned 
with vinegar, pepper, salt, and Cayenne; some use 
lemon juice instead of vinegar. Baste the meat or 
game often with the mixture. When done place it 
on a dish. If any of the mixture is left, pour it into 
the pan the meat was roasted in to make gravy; 
pour it over the meat and serve. 

Kidney Stew. 

Take 1 dozen veal or mutton kidneys, cover them 
with cold water well salted, and let boil from ten to 
fifteen minutes. Drain off the water and remove all 
fat and veins. Cut into pieces about the size of a 



MEATS. 41 



nut, put on in enough fresh water to cover them 
well, and skim as they boil. Add 2 or 3 bay leaves, 
a small onion minced fine, and a little nutmeg. 
Stew slowly until tender, then add a wineglass of 
sherry and serve. Belle Kelso Allison. 

Jucksou, Teuu. 

Scotch Stew. 

Grind 3 pounds good beef, J pound tallow, add 1 
onion chopped fine. Pour over this 1 cup of boiling 
water, season it with 1 teaspoonful of black pepper, 
a small pinch of Cayenne, and put into a porcelain 
saucepan. Let simmer for three hours; just before 
taking up add 1 large tablespoonful of butter and a 
very light one of salt. Mrs. W. R. Bryan. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Pecaloming (Spanish Dish). 

Stew tomatoes until all water is out and quite 
brown ; stir in an equal amount of cold meat chopped 
fine, use a liberal supply of butter, salt, and pepper, 
also a little Worcestershire sauce, stir while heating, 
and serve hot. Mrs. S. A. C. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Meat Roll. 

Make a pastry and roll out large and round ; have 
meat put through a chopper and season highly with 
butter, salt, pepper, and onion juice, spread over the 
pastry, and fold over as in any other roll. Bake and 
serve hot. It must not l5e too dry. Any kind of 
cold meat can be chopped and used the same way. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. S. A. C. 



42 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Meat Scallop. 
Take cold meat of any kind and gravy or stock in 
which it was cooked (cutting the meat fine), cracker 
crumbs, and broken macaroni. Boil the macaroni 
until tender. Cover the bottom of a baking dish 
with cracker crumbs, a layer of meat, season it with 
pepper and salt, a layer of macaroni, and so on until 
dish is full, having a layer of crumbs last. Pour 
over this the gravy or stock and bake one hour. 

Game. 
Roast large game as you would turkey; small 
game as smothered chicken. Broil or barbecue it if 
desired. Make all game stews or pies as chicken 
stews and pies are prepared. 



SAUCES AND CATSUPS. 



Roast Beef, — Tomato or cranberiy sance, grated 
horse-radish, mustard, pickles. 

Roast Pork. — Cranberry or apple sauce. 

Roast Teal. — Tomato, cranberry, or onion sauce, 
horse-radish, and lemons. 

Roast Mutton. — Currant jelly, caper sauce. 

Boiled Mutton.— Onion or caper sauce. 

Boiled Fowls. — Bread, onion, cranberry, lemon, ov 
cream sauce. 

Roast Turhey. — Cranberry sauce, currant jelly. 

Boiled Turl'ei/. — Oyster sauce. 

Yenison or Wild Ducks. — Cranberry sauce, currant 

jelly- 

Boiled Fresh Mackerel. — Stewed gooseberries. 

Boiled Bluefish. — White cream or lemon sauce. 

Broiled Shad. — Parsley or egg sauce. 

Fresh Salmon.- — Green pease, cream sauce. 

Lemon juice makes a nice addition to all insipid 
fish. 

Pickles are good with all kinds of meats in gen- 
eral. 

Drawn Butter. 

Take J cup of fresh butter, mix well with it 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of flour, add 1 cup of warm water or milk, 
a little salt, mix smoothly, and set it in boiling* 
water; stir it until it thickens. 

(43) 



44 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Egg Sauce. 
Mix into 1 cup of drawn butter smoothly the yolks 
of 3 hard-boiled eg^^. Add minced parsley or 
chopped pickles if desired. 

Oyster Sauce. 
To 1 cup of drawn butter add J cup of small oys- 
ters, a pinch of salt and Cayenne, a few drops of vin- 
egar or lemon juice, and letJt come to a boil and 
serve. 

Tomato Sauce (No. 1). 

Take 1 quart can of tomatoes, add a slice of onion, 
a little pepper and salt, 2 cloves, and boil it ten or 
fifteen minutes. Mix with 1 tablespoonful of butter, 
1 tablespoonful of flour, stir it on the stove until it 
browns, then stir it into the tomatoes, let it cook ten 
minutes, rub it through a sieve, and it is ready for 
use. 

Tomato Sauce (No. 2). 

Take 2 pounds of prepared tomatoes, 1 pound of 
sugar, 1 pint of vinegar, cloves to taste, and boil 
well. Sallie Miller. 

Russellville, Teuii. 

Onion Sauce. 
Stir into J cup of butter 1 tablespoonful of flour, 
add 2 cups of boiling milk, stirring it all the time 
until it comes to a boil. Then add 3 or 4 boiled 
onions chopped fine, and season with salt and pep- 
per. 

Celery Sauce. 

Mix J cup of butter with 2 tablespoonfuls of flour, 
stir in 2 cups of boiling milk, cut 2 or 3 heads of cel- 
ery into small pieces, boil it a few minutes in water. 



SAUCES AND CATSUPS. 45 

strain off the water, add the celery, to the milk and 
butter, and stir it over the fire a few minutes. An- 
other way is to put the celery through a sieve after 
it is cooked tender, mix it with 2 tablespoonfuls of 
liquor in which turkey is boiled; beat the yolk of i 
eg^ well with clear juice of 1 lemon, add it to celery 
mixture, and season with salt and pepper. 

Caper Sauce. 

Mix 2 tablespoonfuls of butter with 1 tablespoon- 
f ul of flour, add 1 cup of boiling water, stir it over 
fire until thick, chop fine and add to it 1 hard-boiled 
Q^g and 2 tablespoonfuls of capers. Nasturtiums 
resemble capers in taste, and may be used instead. 
If neither are to be had, use finely chopped pickle. 

Mint Sauce. 

Put into J cup of vinegar 4 tablespoonfuls of 
chopped mint, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, and let it 
stand one hour or more before using. 

Cranberry Sauce. 

Wash and pick 1 quart of cranberries, put them in 
a saucepan with 2 cups of water, stew slowly, stir- 
ring it often, until as thick as marmalade; add 3 
cups of sugar, boil a few minutes, and put it into a 
wet mold to get cold, or strain it through a sieve into 
the mold. 

Apple Sauce. 

Peel and slice some ripe tart apples, cover them 
with water, stew them slowly until they can be beat- 
en smooth, put in a lump of butter, sweeten to taste. 



46 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Sauce for Salmon Loaf. 

Four eggs well beaten, 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1 
teaspoonful of butter, 2 tablespoonf uls of vinegar, a 
little water; mix and set it in boiling water, stir it 
till thick, and add a little sugar. 

Another sauce: 1 cup of boiling milk thickened 
with 1 tablespoonful of flour or cornstarch, 1 table- 
spoonful of butter, the salmon liquor, and 1 beaten 
egg. Take from the fire, season, and let it stand in 
hot water three minutes, covered; add a little lemon 
juice. Mrs. Frank Overton Watts. 

Union City, Tenn. 

Tomato Jelly. 

1 can of tomatoes, 

1 bay leaf, 6 cloves, 1 onion, 

5 tablespoonf uls of vinegar, 

1 tablespoonful of sugar. 

Salt, red and white pepper to taste. 
Simmer this J hour, then add J box of Nelson's gela- 
tin which has been dissolved in enough water to 
cover it, add the gelatin to the mixture while it is 
hot, strain it into molds, set it aside to cool and con- 
geal. Fine with meats. 

Mrs. Bettie L. Wilson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chili Sauce (No. 1). 
Take 1 gallon of ripe tomatoes, peel and cut them 
up, drain off the water, 1 pint of onions cut into 
small pieces, boil them together until it is as thick 
as jou like, add 1 pint of good apple vinegar, 1 cup 
of sugar (or more, to taste), season with red and 
black pepper, salt, and spices if you like (1 prefer it 
without spices). Boil all together, put up air tight. 



SAUCES AND CATSUPS. 47 

Can use caimed tomatoes in winter, making a smaller 
quantity just as you wish to use it. 

Chili Sauce (No. 2). 
Take 1 quart of tomatoes, fresh or canned, 2 
onions size of an egg, cut fine, 1 teaspoonful each of 
salt, pepper, and sugar, 1 pod of red pepper, ^ cup of 
vinegar. Boil until thick. Mrs. Seid Waddell. 

Union City, Tenn. 

Chili Sauce (No. 3). 
Twenty-four ripe tomatoes, 8 onions, 6 peppers, 8 
cups of vinegar, 8 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 6 table- 
spoonfuls of salt, 1 tablespoonful each of cinnamon, 
spice, nutmeg, and cloves. Superior to tomato cat- 
sup. Mrs. J. H. McAdoo. 

Wayerly, Teim. 

Chili Sauce (No. 4). 
To 1 peck of tomatoes add 3 cups each of peppers 
and sugar, 2 cups of onions, 1 cup of salt, 3 pints of 
vinegar, 3 teaspoonfuls each of cloves and cinna- 
mon, 2 teaspoonfuls each of nutmeg and ginger. 
Boil three hours. Put up air tight. 

Mrs. Ava Herstein. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Made Mustard (No. 1). 
Mix 4 tablespoonfuls of best English mustard 
with 1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 teaspoonful of 
sugar, a little salt, and stir it into 1 cup of boiling 
hot vinegar. 

Made Mustard (No. 2). 

Cream 1 heaped tablespoonful of butter and 1 ta- 
blespoonful of sugar, add 2 tablespoonfuls of mus- 
tard mixed with 1 tablespoonful of salt. Beat 1 egg 



48 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

very liglit and beat it into the creamed mixture; 
heat J cup of vinegar to boiling point and stir it in 
quickly, and, if it does not thicken the egg, set the 
bowl over boiling w^ater a few minutes, stirring it 
constantly until thick. Mrs. Annie Jones. 

Nashville, Ten a. 

Horse-radish Sauce. 
Grind horse-radish, cover it with vinegar, add a 
little sugar, put it in a wide-mouth bottle with air- 
tight top. 

Celery Vinegar. 

Cut 1 bunch of fresh celery into small bits or use J 
pound of celery seed, put into a jar, scald 1 quart of 
best vinegar, 1 tea spoonful of salt, 1 tablespoonful 
of sugar, i)our it over the celery (or seed), let it cool, 
and put it away in a jar tightly corked. In about 
two weeks strain it and put into small bottles; cork 

them tightly. 

Onion Vinegar. 

Mince G large onions, strew on them 1 tablespoon- 
ful of salt, and let it stand five or six hours. Scald 
1 quart of good vinegar, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 
and pour it over the onions; i)ut in a jar, cover it, 
and let it steep two weeks ; strain it and put in small 
bottles ; cork tightly. 

Tomato Catsup. 
To 2 quarts of tomato pulp (or 2 cans of tomatoes) 
add 2 or 3 onions minced fine, boil in a porcelain ket- 
tle until it can be mashed through a sieve; put into 
kettle again, season with 1 pint of good cider vine- 
gar, black pepper, salt, Cayenne, and spices if you 
like (if you use spices, tie them in a muslin bag), and 



SAUCES AND CATSUPS. 49 

let boil uutil thick as desired; seal tight while hot 
iu large-mouth bottles; use black bottles or wrap 
them iu paper to keep the light from it. Keep in a 
dry, cool place. Some put a little salad oil on top 
in each bottle. 

Green Tomato Catsup. 
Slice 1 peck of green tomatoes, 2 large onions, 
place in layers, sprinkling salt between, and let 
stand twentv-four hours. Drain, and add 1 pound 
of mustard seed, 1 tablespoonful each of ground 
mustard, cloves, and ginger, 2 teaspoonfuls each of 
celery seed and black pepper, J cup of sugar, put it 
in a porcelain kettle, and coyer it with good yinegar ; 
boil two hours and strain it through a sieve, heat 
again, and seal while hot. 

Plum Catsup. 
Put in a preserving kettle 6 pounds of plums, 3^ 
pounds of sugar, 1 quart of good vinegar. Boil till 
plums are reduced to pulp ; cool and press through a 
sieve, add cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and allspice to 
taste. Seal in glasses. Mrs. E. E. Hoss. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Gooseberry Catsup. 
Boil 5 pounds of gooseberries (not quite ripe) in 1 
pint of vinegar until reduced to pulp; add 2| pounds 
of sugar, 1 tablespoonful each of cinnamon, allspice, 
and black pepper; seal hot and air tight. Make 
grape catsup the same way. 

Cucumber Catsup. 
Peel and grate the cucumbers, salt them a little, 
put them in a bag to drain over night; season with 
good apple vinegar, pepper, and salt. For imme- 
diate use, as it is hard to keep. 
4 



PICKLES. 

PICKLES should never be made in vessels of 
brass, iron, copper, or tin; the acid on such 
metals often poisons pickle. Use porcelain or gran- 
ite wsiYe and the best cider vinegar; Do not boil it 
too long, as it reduces strength. All vinegar should 
be scalded before using with pickles, or it will not 
keep well. In using ground spices tie them up in 
muslin bags. Put pickles up in, air-tight glass jars. 
See that they are well covered with vinegar. 

Table Vinegar. 
Take 2 gallons of good apple cider, mix with it 1 
pound of strained new honey, put it into a cask, and 
let stand five or six months, and you will have vine- 
gar so strong that it will have to be diluted with 
water for table use. It is the best vinegar ever 
used for pickling purposes. 

Cucumber Pickle. 
Select 2 dozen large, firm cucumbers, soak them 
clear of brine, slice and scald them in hot vinegar, 
and set them aside in the hot vinegar. To each gal- 
lon of cold vinegar add 1 pound of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful each of cinnamon, ginger, black pepper, 
celery seed, turmeric, ground horse-radish, and 
minced garlic, 1 teaspoonful each of mace, allspice, 
and cloves, J teaspoonful of Cayenne pepper. Tie 
the spices all in a thin cloth, put them in the vine- 
(50) 



PICKLES. 51 



gar, and add the cucumbers; let stew slowly one 
hour; put up hot and air tight in glass jars. Can 
use small whole cucumbers or gherkins. 



Splendid Pickle. 

Take cucumber pickles that have already been 
pickled and slice them, some lengthwise and some 
crosswise, slice some onions rather thick; put in a 
kettle 1 quart of good cider vinegar made sweet with 
sugar and colored strongly with turmeric, season 
Jiighlij with cinnamon, cloves, allspice, mace, white 
and black mustard seed, celery seed, and let all boil 
well. Then put in the cucumbers and onions, boil 
until the pickles are a rich citron color, and seal in 
jars. Mrs. Johnella Corbett. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Mixed Pickle. 

One-half peck of green tomatoes, 3 large heads of 
cabbage, 15 large onions, 25 cucumbers, J pint of 
white mustard seed, 1 pint of grated horse-radish, 1 
ounce of celery seed, J cup each of black pepper, 
turmeric, and ground cinnamon. Cut tomatoes, cab- 
bage, onions, and cucumbers in small pieces and salt 
them down over night. Next day strain off the 
brine and put the articles in vinegar and water in 
which the turmeric has been dissolved, and let stand 
one day. Then to 1 gallon of vinegar add 3 pounds 
of sugar and boil the articles, in which the spices 
have been mixed well, and the pickle is ready for 
use. Mrs. Len F. Davis. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



d2 TENNESSEE model HOVSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Mixed Mustard Pickle. 

1 peck of green tomatoes, 

1 large head of cabbage, 

15 medium-sized cucumbers, 

15 large white onions, 

I gallon small white onions, 

3 heads of cauliflower. 
Cut the articles into small pieces, mix with salt, put 
it into a bag, and let stand in a vessel twenty-four 
hours ; lift out the bag with pickle in it, let it drain, 
place it in cold water a few hours, then drain well, 
squeezing out all salty water. Mix with the pickle 
J cup of ground black pepper, J ounce of celery 
seed, 1 ounce of turmeric, boil 1 gallon of vinegar, 
and pour over it hot; do this two mornings. The 
third morning make a mustard dressing of 1 cup of 
ground mustard, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of flour, mix it 
dry, and pour on by degrees J gallon of vinegar; 
put it on the stove and stir it until quite thick, mix 
it in the pickle while warm, and if needed, add more 
sugar and vinegar. Heat boiling hot and put up 
air tight in jars. This pickle will keep several years 
if made carefully. 

Chowchow (No. 1). 

Take 2 quarts of green tomatoes, 2 quarts of on- 
ions, 2 quarts of pickled beans, 2 dozen small cu- 
cumbers, 1 dozen green peppers, 1 large head of cab- 
bage, chop all fine, sprinkle 1 cup of salt over it, and 
let stand over night. Next morning pour off the 
brine and season the pickle with 2 tablespoonfuls 
each of celery seed, black pepper, turmeric, and cur- 
ry powder, 1 tablespoonful of ground cloves, J tea- 



PICKLES. 53 



spoonful of Cayenne pepper, 1 cup of brown sugar; 
cover it all with vinegar and let boil until tender. 
Put up hot and air tight. Mrs. Irby Morgan. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chowchow^ (No. 2). 
1 peck green cucumbers, 
^ peck of green tomatoes, 
1 pint of green peppers, 
^ peck of onions, 
1 ounce of celery seed, 
1 ounce of white mustard seed, 
1 ounce of turmeric, 

1 ounce of whole cloves, 

3 tablespoonfuls of ground mustard. 

Grated horse-radish and black pepper to taste. 

2 pounds of brown sugar. 

Slice or chop fine, salt tcell, and hang in thin cloth to 
drip in eve; next morning seald in weak vinegar, then 
squeeze dry, and add strong vinegar. Will keep for 
years. Mrs. C. W. McG. 

Franklin, Tenn. 

Chowchow (No. 3). 
Take 1 peck of green tomatoes, 5 onions, 3 heads 
of solid cabbage, 1 dozen green peppers; chop sepa- 
rately, then mix, salt well, and drain over night. 
Put in a porcelain kettle 1 pound of brown sugar, J 
cup of grated horse-radish, 1 teaspoonful each of 
ground black pepper, whole white mustard seed, and 
celery seed, cover with vinegar, boil, and pour on the 
pickle in a jar. Do this several successive days, 
then put away in glass jars. 

Mrs. Ava Herstein. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



54 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Chopped Pickle. 
1 gallon of cabbage, 
1 gallon of green tomatoes, 
1 quart of onions. 
Sprinkle salt over tomatoes, let stand awliile, drain 
off the water, mix the above ingredients together 
after having chopped them, cover them with vine- 
gar in a kettle, add 2 tablespoonfuls of ground mus- 
tard, 1 tablespoonful each of ginger, cloves, and 
mace, 1 ounce of celery seed, 3 ounces of turmeric, 3 
pounds of sugar. Boil fifteen minutes. 

Union City, Tenn. MrS. MaRY MiLES. 

Hayden Salad. 
Take 1 gallon of cabbage, 1 gallon of tomatoes 
(either green or ripe; I prefer green), J pint of green 
peppers with seed out, 1 quart of onions, all chopped 
fine. Sprinkle salt over the whole, let stand several 
hours, strain off the juice, add 5 tablespoonfuls of 
mixed mustard, 2 tablespoonfuls of ginger, 1 table- 
spoonful each of cinnamon, cloves, and mace, 3 
ounces of turmeric, 1 ounce of celery, and 3 pounds of 
sugar. Cover it all with good vinegar, boil slowl^^ 
till done; 1 cup of salad oil is a great improvement. 

Belle Mead, Tenn, MiSS LiZZIE HoOVER. 

Yellow Pickle (No. 1). 
To 1 gallon of strong vinegar add 1 ounce of tur- 
meric, 2 ounces of bleached ginger, \ ounce of mace, 
1 handful of garlic, 2 handfuls of horse-radish, J 
pound of mustard seed, 2 ounces of long peppers. 
Put in a vessel, well stopped, and let stand eight or 
ten days in the sun. Cut cabbages in halves or 
quarters, sprinkle with salt, and let remain twenty- 



PICKLES. 55 



four hours; then laj them on dishes and expose them 
to the sun until they are perfectly dry. Turn them 
often while drying. When the cabbage is ready lay 
it in jars, pour over the prepared vinegar, stop very 
close, and let stand in the sun ten days. Cloves 
and nutmeg should be added to taste. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. IrBY MoRGAN. 

Yellow Pickle (No. 2). 
Have firm white cabbage cut in quarters, put in 
strong brine for two or three days ; then scald them 
in clear water until you can run a straw through 
them, take them out and dry them for twenty-four 
hours in the sun or by the stove, as most convenient. 
Then put them in strong cider vinegar with pow- 
dered turmeric sufficient to color the cabbage, and 
let them remain in the vinegar about ten days. 
Then take the cabbage out and put it on a clean 
plank and let it drain two or three hours. Have the 
following spices prepared : To 1 gallon of cabbage 2 
ounces of white ginger, 2 ounces of white pepper, \ 
ounce of mace beaten fine, 4 ounces of horse-radish 
cut fine, 4 ounces of garlic, 2 ounces of white mus- 
tard seed, J ounce of celery seed. Put in a layer of 
cabbage and a layer of spice until the jar is three- 
fourths full, fill the jar with cider vinegar, in two or 
three days pour the vinegar from them, scald it, and 
to every gallon of vinegar add 5 pounds of brown 
sugar while the vinegar is boiling. Be sure and 
keep the pickle covered with the vinegar, and the 
jar should be tightly covered at all times, and dur- 
ing the warm weather be placed in the sun as often 
as may be convenient. Mrs. S. F. McClay. 

Nashville, Tenn, 



66 TENNES&Ell MODEL ROWEItOLD GUIDE. 

Cabbage Pickle. 
For a two-gallon jar take cabbage enough quar- 
tered to fill it, pour on it hot brine, let stand four 
daj8, squeeze out of brine, pour over them weak vin- 
egar, let remain several days. Take strong vinegar, 
2 ounces of cinnamon bark, essence of cloves to 
taste, 2 ounces of turmeric, put this over the cab- 
bage, and tie up closely. Mrs, F. N. Harris. 

Waverly, Tenn. 

Sliced Pickle. 

25 cucumbers, 

2 heads of cabbage, 

15 large onions, 

1 pint of small onions, 

1 pint of grated horse-radish. 
Slice the cucumbers lengthwise, slice the large on- 
ions, cut the cabbage as for slaw, sprinkle them 
with salt, and let stand one day; drain it well one 
night. Put it in weak vinegar and let stand two 
days, drain again, and put into a jar, after mixing 
in the following: ^ pound of white mustard seed, 1 
ounce each of ground pepper, celery seed, cinnamon, 
and turmeric. Boil 1 gallon of good vinegar and 
pour over this three mornings in succession; the last 
time add 2 pounds of sugar. Put up air tight. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. W. H. BuMPAS. 

Tomato Pickle. 
Slice 1 peck of green tomatoes, J gallon of onions, 
salt them down overnight with 1 pint of salt. Next 
morning put in a sack and drain well, then scald in 
weak vinegar and drain again. Put on the fire 
enough strong vinegar to cover them, and add 1 



PICKLES. 57 



grated nutmeg, 2 tablespoonfuls each of ground 
cloves and cinnamon, 2 small pods of green pepper 
cut in small pieces, 5 cups of brown sugar. Let all 
boil slightly, then add the tomatoes and onions, and 
let all boil again. Tie the cloves and cinnamon in a 
thin cloth, but scatter the nutmeg in loose. 

, Sparta, Teun. LiZZIE M. WiLLIAMS. 

Sweet Tomato Pickle. 
Slice 15 pounds of green tomatoes, let stand over- 
night with a little salt sprinkled over them. Drain 
well and add 5 pounds of sugar, 1 quart of best vin- 
egar, 1 ounce of cloves, 2 ounces of cinnamon, let 
boil fifteen or twenty minutes, skim out the toma- 
toes, and boil the sirup until thick if preferred. 

Waverly, Tenn. MrS. J. H. McAdOO. 

Pickled Watermelon Rind, 
Take the thickest rind you can get, peel off the 
green part, and cut out the soft inner part. Cut it 
in strips or fancy pieces, lay them in brine strong 
enough to float an q%^, and let remain several days. 
Then soak it in clear water, changing it several 
times, until it is clear of brine. Put a lump of lime 
the size of a walnut in 2 gallons of cold water and 
let the rind soak overnight in it, then soak it in 
clear water six hours, then scald it in strong alum 
water and change to cold w^ater again, and let stand 
overnight. Make a sirup of J pound of sugar to 1 
pound of fruit, 1 pint of vinegar, 1 tablespoonful of 
turmeric, J ounce of white ginger, mace, cloves, and 
cinnamon to taste. Put in the pieces of rind and 
boil them until they are clear. Put up hot in glass 
jars. 



58 TEIiJSfESSEJE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Sweet Pickle for Fruit. 
Most of the receipts for making sweet pickle for 
fruit are similar. To every quart of fruit allow 1 
cup of sugar, 1 pint of good cider vinegar, and 1 ta- 
blespoonful each of ground cinnamon, cloves, and 
allspice, tied in a muslin cloth. Let come to a boil, 
drop the fruit in and cook until it is tender, remove 
the fruit and boil the sirup fifteen minutes, put the 
fruit in again and let boil, and seal in jars. 

Eaisin Sweet Pickle. 
Use 2 pounds of nice, large raisins stemmed and 
seeded, 3 dozen small cucumber pickles cut in small 
pieces, a small quantity of stick cinnamon, a few 
pieces of mace, 2 tablespoonfuls of white mustard 
seed, 1 tablespoonful of celery seed, 1 teaspoonful 
of ground black pepper, 3 cups of light brown sugar, 
1 quart of vinegar. Nannie Alexander Denny. 

Dixon Spi'ings, Tenn."; 

Citron Pickle. 
Slice the cucumbers as soon as taken from brine 
in slices about J of an inch thick, soak them in clear 
water till quite fresh, changing the w^ater several 
times. Boil them in alum water half an hour, then 
in strong ginger tea half an hour. Have ready a 
sirup made of 1 quart of good vinegar, 1 pint of 
water, 3 pounds of brown sugar, adding cinnamon, 
a few cloves, and mace. Put the cucumbers in 
while the sirup is boiling, let boil three or four min- 
utes, place in a jar, and cover closely. It is ready 
for use as soon as cold. Four pounds of cucumbers 
will be sufficient for said amount of sirup. Be sure 



PICKLES. 59 



to secure large, tender cucumbers, and slice them in 
circles. Mrs. M. P. Polk. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Pickled Peaches (No. 1). 

9 pounds of peaches, 
3 pounds of sugar, 

3 quarts of cider vinegar. 
Peel the peaches and put cloves in each peach, add 
sugar and vinegar, let boil five or ten minutes in a 
porcelain vessel, then add a little allspice. 

Livingston, Tenn. MrS. A. L. WiNDLE. 

Pickled Peaches (No. 2). 

10 pounds of fruit, pared, 
4J pounds of sugar, 

1 quart of vinegar. 

Mace, cinnamon, cloves, to taste. 
Lay the peaches in the sugar one hour, drain off 
every drop of sirup and put it over the fire with 1 
cup of water, boil until scum rises, skim, and put in 
the fruit, boil it five minutes. Take out the peaches 
with a perforated skimmer, spread them upon dishes 
to cool. Add the vinegar and spices to the sirup 
and boil fifteen minutes, and pour it over the fruit 
in glass jars. Mrs. Stewart Kirkpatrick. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Sweet Peach Pickle (No. 1). 
To i bushel of peaches add 1 quart of white wine 
vinegar and 7 pounds of granulated sugar. Boil the 
peaches in the vinegar and sugar until a straw can 
be stuck through them. Put up hot and air tight in 
glass jars. Mrs. Ava Herstein. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



60 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 



Sweet Peach Pickle (No. 2). 
Take 4 pounds of sugar and make a sirup of it. 
Put in a few peaches at a time, cook until a fork will 
enter them easily. Take these out, put in more, and 
when all are cooked put them into a jar. Boil down 
the sirup until quite thick, add 1 pint of good vine- 
gar, pour it over the fruit. Spices to taste. This 
quantity of sirup will be sufficient for 8 pounds of 
peaches. Mrs. Florrie Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Vinegar Peaches. 
To 1 peck of peeled peaches 3 pounds of sugar, J 
pint of strong vinegar. Boil the peaches a short 
time in enough water to cover them, and put them 
on dishes to cool. Make a sirup of sugar and some 
of the water in which the peaches were boiled and 
also vinegar. Then put in the peaches and boil 
until you can pierce them with a straw. Put in cans 
and seal. Be sure not to have sirup too thin. You 
will be pleased with this receipt. 

Union City, Tenn. MrS. NeLLIE F. MoRRIS. 



SALADS. 

THE best and freshest material should be used iu 
making salads — vegetables fresh and crispj oil 
01' butter of the very best, fish, fowl, or meats well 
cooked, pure apple vinegar; in fact, every ingredient 
of the hestj if you wish to be sure of success. 

Mayonnaise Dressing (No. 1). 

Yolks of 6 eggs, 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 

3 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 

1 teaspoonful of salt, 

J teaspoonful of mustard, 

A small bit of Cayenne, 

1 cup of vinegar. 
Mix well together and boil it in a double vessel, 
stirring it all the time until thick. When cool and 
ready for use thin it with cream. This dressing will 
keep for weeks in a cool place, adding the cream 
just as you use it. If you prefer, you can thin it 
with vinegar instead of cream, adding more sugar 
if needed. 

Mayonnaise Dressing (No. 2). 
Cream together yolk of 1 egg, 4 tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, and J teaspoonful of mustard; cook 6 table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar and J teaspoonful of butter in 
a double vessel five minutes, stir in the other mix- 
ture, and let boil until it thickens. Serve on salad 
immediately before use. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. A LEX M. RaLSTON. 

(61) 



62 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Salad Dressing (No. 1). 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 

2 tablespoonf uls of sugar or to taste, 
1 teaspoonful of salt, 

^ teaspoonful of mustard, 
A small bit of Cayenne, 

1 teaspoonful of celery seed if liked, 

2 eggs well beaten, 
1 cup of hot vinegar. 

Mix smoothly together and cook it in a double ves- 
sel, stirring it all the time, until thick as paste. Add 
3 tablespoonfuls of cream just when ready for use. 
A nice dressing for slaw, lettuce, or salads of any 
kind. 

Salad Dressing (No. 2). 

Yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, 

1 teaspoonful of mustard, 

2 teaspoonfuls of salt, 

1 salt spoon of Cayenne pepper, 

2 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 
Whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff, 
1 cup of melted butter or oil, 

1 cup of hot vinegar, 

2 tablespoonfuls of celery seed. 
Commencing with the yolks, add the ingredients in 
the order named, when well mixed cook it thicker 
than good cream, add 1 cup of cream the last thing, 
ptirring it all the time. When cold odd the juice of 
1 or 2 lemons if you like. Mrs. Byrd Murray. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chicken Salad. 
Boil fowls tender, remove all fat, gristle, and 



SALADS. 63 



skin, cut the meat in small pieces. To 1 chicken 
put two and a half times its weight in celery, cut in 
small pieces, mix thoroughly, and set it in a cool 
place. Make a mayonnaise dressing, and when 
ready for the table pour the dressing oyer the chick- 
en and celery, mixing well. Set it in a cool place 
until ready to serve, garnish with celery tips, hard- 
boiled eggs, or lettuce leaves. Cabbage can be used 
if you cannot get celery ; in that case use celery vin- 
egar in the dressing. Turkey makes a fine salad. 

Oyster Salad (No. 1). 

Drain the liquor from 1 quart of oysters, scald 
them in vinegar, but do not cook them, then drop 
them in cold water, and drain off. Have nice, crisp 
celery cut in small pieces, use 1 quart after it is cut, 
mix it with the oysters, also some finely cut pickle 
if you like. When ready to serve pour salad dress- 
ing over it and garnish it with celery tips and slices 
of eggs. 

Oyster Salad (No. 2). 

J cup of vinegar, 

J cup of liquor of oysters, 

^ cup of butter, 

Yolks of four eggs beaten light. 
Add the yolks to other ingredients while boiling. 
Toast 3 biscuits, roll them very fine, add them to the 
boiling mixture, take it from the stove, and pour it 
over the oysters, which have been cut in halves. 
Put in a pretty dish and garnish prettily. Let it get 
quite cold before using. Miss Susie Gentry. 

Franklin, Tenn. 



64 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Oyster Salad (No. 3). 
Drain the liquor from 1 can of oysters or 3 dozen 
fresh oysters, chop the oysters fine, place them in a 
covered dish. Then take J cup of good vinegar, ^ 
cup of butter or olive oil, 1 tablespoonful of mus- 
tard, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoonful of celery seed, a little salt and pepper, add 
all this to the liquor drained from cove oysters, let 
it come to a boil, and pour it over the chopped oys- 
ters. Very good. Mrs. Robert Purdy. 

Henderson, Tenn. 

Oyster Salad (No. 4). 
To 1 cup of oysters add yolks of 4 eggs, J cup each 
of cream, butter, vinegar, liquor from oysters, rolled 
crackers, and 2 teaspoonfuls of mustard, salt and 
pepper to taste. Beat the eggs, stir in the cream, 
vinegar, and other ingredients, put on the fire, and 
stir it constantly, putting in the crackers last. Cut 
fine 2 cucumber pickles, pour the mixture over the 
oysters. Mrs. Maggie Gooch. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Salmon Salad. 

Use 1 can of salmon, cut up celery (about 2 heads 
or more), and mix it with the salmon. When ready 
to use pour over it a salad dressing, garnish with 
celery or lettuce. 

Sardine Salad. 

Drain off the oil from 1 large box of sardines, re- 
move the skin, tail, and backbone, mix them well 
with 6 hard-boiled eggs squeezed through a potato 
masher, season with salt and pepper. Serve with 
salad dressing or vinegar. 



SALADS. 65 



Potato Salad (No. 1). 
Boil 4 large Irish potatoes, peel and mash them 
smooth, mince 2 onions and add to the potatoes, 
make a dressing of- yolks of 3 hard-boiled eggs, 1 
small cup of vinegar, 1 teaspoonful of black pepper, 
1 teaspoonful of mustard, 1 dessert-spoonful of cel- 
ery seed, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, salt to 
taste, mix it well with the potatoes. Garnish with 
slices of egg and celery or lettuce. 

Potato Salad (No. 2). 

Take 10 cold, boiled Irish potatoes, slice them 
thin, make a dressing of 1 tablespoonful of butter, ^ 
teaspoonful of mustard, 1 cup of vinegar, salt, pep- 
Ijer, and sugar to taste, 1 egg well beaten, and 1 on- 
ion cut fine, cook a few minutes and pour it over the 
sliced potatoes, and serve. 

Potato Salad (No. 3). 

Boil 6 large Irish potatoes, take 2 hard-boiled 
eggs, slice 3 onions, la}^ them in vinegar half an 
hour. When the potatoes and eggs are cold chop 
potatoes, eggs, and onions fine, add 1 teaspoonful of 
salt, 1 teaspoonful of celery seed, IJ teaspoonfuls of 
mixed mustard, J cup of vinegar. Make a few hours 
before serving. Mrs. J. M. Hudson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Potato Salad (No. 4). 
Boil your Irish potatoes carefully, cut in small 
slices with raw onions, and have a dressing of egg, 
raw or cooked mustard, pepper, salt, and good vin- 
egar, oil if desired, also a few cracker crumbs. 

Fi-anklin. Tenn. ' MrS. C. W. McG. 

5 



66 TENNESSEE MODEL BOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Tomato Salad. 

Peel and slice firm, smooth tomatoes about J of 
an inch thick and set them on ice. Line a salad 
bowl with lettuce leaves nicely washed, place the 
cold sliced tomatoes on it, pour over each slice of 
tomato a spoonful of mayonnaise or cream dressing, 
and serve. 

Tomato Jelly Salad. 

Soak J box of gelatin in 1 cup of cold water one 
hour, add J cup of hot water to dissolve it. Take 1 
pint of finely chopped tomatoes, add the gelatin, 
season with a little minced onion, Cayenne pepper, 
and salt. Let the mixture boil tAvo or three min- 
utes, then strain it through a cloth, wet individual 
molds, fill them with the mixture, and set them in a 
cold place to congeal. When the jelly becomes cold 
and set serve each one on a lettuce leaf with mayon- 
naise dressing. This is nice for a luncheon. 

Celery Salad. 
Cut the celery into small pieces about J inch long, 
season it with salad dressing, and serve at once. 

Vegetable Salad. 

Chop cabbage fine, mix 1 cup of cabbage, 1 cup 
of cold, chopped Irish potato, 2 minced onions, 
yolks of 3 hard-boiled eggs, a little pickle, 1 green 
pepper, all chopped fine. Chop all separately, then 
mix them well. Pour over it vegetable salad dress- 
ing, and serve. 

Cabbage Salad. 

Chop fine J head of crisp cabbage and immediately 
before serving pour over it salad dressing. 



SALADS. 67 



Cold Slaw. 
Cut the cabbage fiue ; to ^ small head add yolks of 
3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of 
butter, J teaspoonful of mustard, black pepper, and 
salt to taste. Beat the eggs and add the other in- 
gredients, with 1 cup vinegar, let it stew until quite 
thick, and pour on the cabbage while hot. Let it 
get cold and serve. Celery seed in the dressing or 
chopped celery in the cabbage makes a delightful 
flavor. Lizzie M. Williams. 

Sparta, Tenn. 

Slaw and Dressing. 
Shave cabbage, salt and sprinkle it with celery 
seed. Pour over it the following dressing: Yolks 
of 2 eggs, J cup of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of dry mus- 
tard, a lump of butter size of a walnut, j cup of vin- 
egar. When this boils add 1 cup of buttermilk or 
sour cream. Mrs. Ava Herstein. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



VEGETABLES. 



VEGETABLES of all kinds should be as fresh as 
possible, thoroughly picked over and washed in 
salt water, then placed in cold water awhile before 
cooking. All vegetables for cooking are much better 
when cooked the same day they are gathered. Cook 
steadily after you put them on ; do not let them stop 
hoiling until perfectly done. When about half don<3 
throw in a little salt. Serve hot. Boil a clean char- 
coal with cabbage to destroy the odor. Hold onions 
irndcr water while slicing them to prevent hurting 
the eyes. Some add a small pinch of soda to nearly 
all boiling vegetables. 

Boiled Cabbage. 
Put in a pot half full of water a piece of bacon 
about 4 inches square, set it on the fire to boil. Pick 
off the outer green leaves of the cabbage, quarter it, 
and examine closely to be sure there are no insects 
in it, rinse it in salt water, and let lay in cold water 
one hour. Then put it in a vessel of hot water and 
parboil fifteen minutes; drain the cabbage and place 
it in the pot with the bacon, which has been boiling 
one hour or more while cabbage was being prepared. 
Cook together three-quarters of an hour, or until 
cabbage is tender. Do not boil too long, or it will 
turn yellow. Take up as soon as done, serve with 
Chili sauce. If you do not want to use bacon, par- 
(68) 



VEGETABLES. 69 



boil cabbage fifteen minutes, drain off, add boiling 
water from teakettle, boil until done, drain well, 
dish, and pour over it rich drawn butter. 

Steamed Cabbage. 
Prepare the cabbage as for boiling, chop fine, put 
in a pan with J cup of water, set it in a steamer over 
boiling water, cover closelv. When tender add 1 ta- 
blespoonful of butter, a little salt and pepper, and 
just before taking up add a little vinegar if you 
like. 

Fried Cabbage. 

Chop cold boiled cabbage, fry it in a little hot but- 
ter seasoned with pepper and salt until browned a 
little; add a little cream or vinegar if you i>refer it. 

Sauerkraut. 
Shred or chop cabbage fine, line a keg with cab- 
bage leaves on bottom and sides as you fill it. Put 
in a 8-inch layer of cut cabbage, sprinkle it with 4 
tablespoonfuls of salt; after you have made several 
layers this way pound it with a wooden pestle until 
the cabbage is covered with its own juice. Pro- 
ceed to line with leaves and layers in this way, beat- 
ing well with the pestle, until the keg is nearly 
filled; beat until it is iceJl covered in its own juice. 
Cover with leaves and a cloth over all ; fit a board 
cover on the kraut, and press it down with a heavy 
weight. Set it away to ferment in a cool, dry cellar. 
In three weeks remove the scum and see that it is 
still well covered in juice. Serve raw, fried, or 
boiled with pork. It is made in the fall for winter 
use. 



70 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Stuffed Cabbage. 
Choose a large, firm cabbage, take off the outer 
leaves, pour boiling water over it to make it pliable, 
with a sharp knife cut out the stalk and some of 
the inside leaves. Chop the leaves fine, with a 
little celery, onions, ham or sausage, and bread 
crumbs, salt and pepper to taste; stuff the head with 
this, tie up in a cloth, boil or steam it until tender. 
Take out and unbind carefully and lay it in a dish, 
pour drawn butter over it, and serve. 

Boiled Irish Potatoes. 

Get potatoes of uniform size, white, and free from 
blemish, put them in cold salted water, boil until 
done, pour off all the water, sprinkle them with salt, 
and set them back, with top off, to one side of stove 
to dry three or four minutes. Peel them quickly 
and put in a dish. Serve plain or season with but- 
ter, pepper, and salt over them. If new potatoes, 
rub the skins off and place them in boiling salted 
water. Prepare and serve as above, or when done 
and drained have ready in a saucepan butter, cream, 
pepper, and salt, let it get hot but not boil, pour it 
over the potatoes, and serve hot. The art of cook- 
ing potatoes is to not let them stop boiling, and 
cook them just enough, taking up as soon as they are 
done. 

Mashed Irish Potatoes. 

Old potatoes are best mashed. Boil them in salt 
water or steam them until done, drain them dry, 
peel, and squeeze them through a potato masher; 
work in 1 tablespoonful of butter, salt, and enough 
milk to make as soft as dough; dish and serve. Or 



VEGETABLES. 71 



put them on a pie plate and bake brov^^n in the oven; 
if the hitter^ add 2 beaten eggs to the mixture be- 
fore baking. 

Flaked Irish Potatoes. 

Prepare as mashed potatoes, only do not touch 
them after they have been squeezed through a pota- 
to masher into a hot dish ; serve hot. 

Creamed Irish Potatoes. 

Boil or steam old potatoes, peel, and run them 
through a potato masher, add a large lump of butter, 
and cream enough to make smooth, salt to taste, 
heat as cake batter until it is quite white. 

Stewed Irish Potatoes. 

Peel and quarter the potatoes and soak them in 
cold water half an hour, place in a saucepan with 
enough cold salted vvater to cover them, stew until 
done. Drain off half the w^ater and add 1 cup of 
milk, boil three minutes, stirring it all the time, sea- 
son v/ith butter, salt, and pepper, thicken a little 
with flour, let boil up, and serve. 

Irish Potatoes with Roast. 

About three-quarters of an hour before roast is 
done peel some medium-sized potatoes, put them in 
the pan around the roast; or take mashed potatoes, 
adding a little chopped onion, pepper, and salt, mix 
with 1 beaten egg, shape into balls, dredge with 
flour, and place around the roast twenty minutes be- 
fore taking it up. Baste the potatoes when you 
baste the roasts 



72 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Saratoga Chips. 
Peel good-sized potatoes, slice them crosswise 
very thin, let stand half an hour in ice water, wipe 
them dry in a cloth. Drop them into boiling lard or 
put them into a frying basket, which is better, and 
set them in boiling lard until a nice light brown. 
Take them out, drain, and sprinkle them with salt 
while hot. 

Stuffed Irish Potatoes (No. 1). 
Take large, nice, smooth potatoes, bake them 
until soft, cut round piece off the top of each, scrape 
out the inside carefully so as not to break the skins. 
Mash the inside smooth with butter and cream, add 
salt and pepper and a little grated cheese, fill the 
skins with the mixture, replace the caps, put them 
in the oven for three minutes, arrange them in a hot 
dish with the caps up. 

Stuffed Irish Potatoes (No. 2). 
Select nice size Irish potatoes, bake in their skins; 
when done split them open, take out the inner part 
and dress it with butter, salt, pepper, celery seed, 
and a little fine-chopped onion. After mixing thor- 
oughly stuff this in the skins and put in the stove 
until ready to serve. Mrs. Len F. Davis. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Irish Potato Cakes. 
Form cold mashed potatoes into flat cakes, flour 
them, and fry a light brown on both sides. 

Scalloped Irish Potatoes. 
A layer of chopped cold Irish potatoes and a layer 
of bread crumbs, upon which put butter, salt, and 



VEGETABLES. 73 



pepper; continue the same until you have several 
layers of each. Warm sweet milk and pour over it 
when ready to bake. It takes about half an hour to 
bake properly. Mrs. J. M. Hudson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Sweet Potatoes. 

Sweet potatoes are baked, steamed, or boiled with 
the jackets on. Cold sweet potatoes may be sliced 
and fried. Boiled potatoes peeled and placed 
around roast shoat and browned are very nice. 
Boiled sweet potatoes must be peeled before send- 
ing to table. 

Baked Sweet Potatoes. 

Boil or steam the potatoes until nearly done, peel 
and slice them lengthwise, put them in a deep bak- 
ing dish, a layer of slices, sprinkle it heavily with 
sugar, a little flour, a bit of salt, gi'ate nutmeg over 
it, and add little lumps of butter. Make 2 or 3 lay 
ers, not more; let the last layer be of sugar, bits of 
butter, etc. Bake it slowly to a nice brown. Some 
slice the potatoes before cooking them any, steam 
half done, and drain, or use raw slices in a shallow 
baking dish and cook slowly, seasoning as above be- 
fore baking. 

Sweet Potato Pudding (No. 1). 
1 quart of grated sweet potato, 
f cup of sugar, 
Butter size of an egg, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 
3 eggs well beaten. 
Flavor with nutmeg or cinnamon, and bake. 

Mont Engle, Tenn. SaLLIE CrOSS ShELTON. 



74 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

SwBET Potato Pudding (No. 2). 
Boil 4 or 5 medium-sized potatoes, mash them 
smooth and fine with 1 cup of sweet milk. Stir to- 
gether 1 cup of butter and 1 cup of sugar until light 
and creamy, add juice of 1 lemon or orange, J tea- 
spoonful of grated nutmeg, 2 teaspoonfuls of ground 
cinnamon ; beat 3 eggs very light, stir them into the 
butter and sugar alternately with the mashed pota- 
toes, beat it hard until it is well mixed and light. 
Pour it into a buttered dish and sprinkle the top with 
cinnamon and a little sugar, bake in a tolerably 
quick oven. You can leave out the lemon or orange 
juice if you prefer it without. Serve hot, with butter. 

String Beans. 
Break off each end of the bean, drawing off at the 
same time the string upon each edge; do this care- 
fully, so as to get off all the string; break them in 
two to see if any string remains. Lay them in cold 
water a few minutes, drain, and put them into boil- 
ing water in which is a small piece of bacon; boil 
about two hours. Or drop the beans into clear, 
boiling water without bacon, boil until tender, and 
drain; or, if water is nearly Wiled out, add 1 table- 
spoonful of butter, J cup of cream, pepper, and salt. 

Dried Beans. 
Soak the beans overnight in lukewarm water, 
drain, and put them in boiling water with a small 
piece of fat bacon ; boil two hours. 

Butter Beans. 
As you shell the beans put them in cold water, 
and cook in boiling water until tender. Serve with 
butter, salt, and pepper over them-. 



VEGETABLES. 75 



Mashed Turnips. 
Put on a small piece of fresh, fat pork to boil, add 
a little salt to the water, peel and slice the turnips, 
and lay them in cold salt water until the pork has 
boiled awhile. Then drain the turnips and put 
them in the pot with the pork, add a little red pep- 
per, let boil until teaider enough to mash, drain out 
and mash, add a pinch of sugar, place them on a dish 
with the piece of pork in the center; serve hot. Or 
boil the turnips without pork, mash and season with 
1 tablespoonful of butter, pepper, and salt. 

Turnip Greens. 
Pick carefully 1 peck of greens, wash them thor- 
oughly in salt water, let stand in salt water half an 
hour. Have lolling in a pot half full of water a 
piece of cured hog jowl which has been nicely 
trimmed and well cleaned. When the jowl is about 
half done drain the greens from the salt water, rinse 
them well, and drain again; place them in the pot 
with the jowl to boil one hour, or until done, dish 
with the jowl in center of the dish with the greens. 
Serve with vinegar and poached eggs. 

Stewed Pumpkin. 

Choose a nice ripe pumpkin, cut in two, take out 
the seeds, slice and peel it, and let stand in cold 
water one hour. Put it in a pot of boiling water 
over the fire, and stew slowly, stirring it often until 
it breaks to pieces. Drain well and rub it through 
a sieve, put into a saucepan on the stove with 1 ta- 
blespoonful of butter, pepper and salt to taste, stir 
and cook it until it is hot and dry; dish and serve. 



7(3 TENN£:SS£E MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Beets. 
Do not break the skins of beets in washing, or 
thej will lose their color in cooking. Boil them 
one hour in hot water, until tender, scrape off the 
skins, slice them in a dish, season with butter and 
pepper, or pour over them a boiling mixture of 1 
tablespoonful of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar, 
a little pepper and salt; serve very hot. Or slice 
them, and when cold x)our vinegar over them. 
Beets can be baked or steamed instead of being 
boiled. 

Parsnips. 
Scrape or peel the parsnips; if large, split them. 
Put into boiling water with a little salt, boil or 
steam them until tender, drain, and slice lengthwise, 
dish, and butter them well. Another way is to boil 
and cut them in thick slices, dredge with flour, and 
fry brown in hot lard, drain, sprinkle with pepper, 
and serve hot. Or boil and scrape them, mash them 
smooth with 1 spoonful of butter and 3 or 4 spoon- 
fuls of cream; pepper and salt to taste, heat in a 
pan, and serve hot. Or, when mashed and seasoned, 
add 2 beaten eggs, 1 cup of milk, 3 tablespoonfuls of 
flour, and fry as fritters. 

Parsnip Fritters. 
Boil 4 parsnips until soft, peel and mash very fine, 
add to them 1 teaspoonful of flour, 1 egg well beaten, 
and a little salt. Make the mixture into small 
cakes, and fry a delicate brown on both sides; serve 
hot. Mrs. J. T. Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



VEGETABLES. 77 



Squashes. 

Wash, peel, and slice the squashes, take out the 
seed, laj the squashes in cold water, boil or steam 
them until quite tender, drain out all the water, 
mash them together with a little butter, pei^per, and 
salt. Put in a stewpan on the stove, stir well until 
it becomes drj-, and let brown a little. Or drain 
the thin slices, dip them in meal or in beaten eg<;' 
and cracker crumbs seasoned with salt and pepper, 
and ivY in hot lard. 

Carrots. 

Wash and scrape the carrots, lav them in cold 
water, boil them in hot water until very tender, 
drain, mash, and mix in 1 tablespoonful of butter, a 
little pepper and salt, and a little cream. Or boil 
until nearly done, cut into small pieces, put in a 
saucepan with a little minced onion, butter, pepper, 
and salt to taste, a little water or milk, simmer half 
an hour; serve hot. 

Egg Plant. 

Take fresh, purple ^gg plants of medium size, peel 
and slice them ^ inch thick, lay them in cold salt 
w^ater one hour. Drain each slice, wipe them dr}-, 
dip them into beaten ^g,g, roll in cracker crumbs, 
and fry them in hot butter until brown. 

Green Pease. 
Shell the pease and lay them in cold water until 
ready to cook, put them in boiling water, enough to 
cover them, boil until tender, drain off part of the 
water, season with salt, pepper, and a lump of but- 
ter with a little flour rubbed in it, let boiL up, and 
serve hot. 



78 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Salsify. 
Scrape the salsify and put it in cold water, cut in 
pieces 1 inch long, boil it in hot water until tender, 
drain off nearly all the water, add 1 cup of milk, a 
lump of butter mixed with a little flour, pepper and 
salt to taste; boil up and serve. Or boil it until 
tender, mash smooth, moisten with milk, add 1 
beaten Qgg, make into cakes, dredge them with flour, 
and fry them brown. 

Asparagus. 
Cut stalks of asparagus equal lengths, using only 
the tender portion, scrape and throw it into cold 
water as you scrape it. Put into boiling water and 
cook it until it is tender; drain, and pour over it 1 
cup of drawn butter, season with pepper and salt, 
dish, and serve, or serve it on toast. Or cut aspara- 
gus into small pieces before boiling, cook, and when 
done season as above, adding 1 beaten egg to drawn 
butter before stirring it in asparagus. 

Spaghetti. 
Plunge the ends in fast boiling water, slightly 
salted; when soft coil them in the water without 
breaking, and boil fifteen minutes. Drain in a co- 
lander and pour cold water on it, put on a hot dish, 
and pour a hot, rich tomato sauce over it, and keep 
on back of range until heated through, or strew over 
with grated cheese. Mrs. M. E. Grantland. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Boiled Corn. 
Shuck and remove the silks well from young, ten- 
der corn, put it in boiling water, add 1 tablespoon- 
ful of sugar, boil fast half an hour, and serve. 



VEGETABLES. 79 



Baked Corn. 
Cut corn off of J dozen nice, tender ears, scrape 
the cob, add ^ cup of milk, 1 tablespoonful of but- 
ter, a little salt, put in a buttered baking dish, bake 
in a moderate oven three-quarters of an hour. 

Fried Corn. 
Out the corn off, scrape the cob, add a pinch of 
salt and a little water; put in a frying pan nice, 
fresh lard, when hot pour in the corn, and fry until 
done and browned a little. Or fry 2 or 3 slices of 
bacon, take them out, and put in the corn. 

Corn Fritters. 

Grate the corn, take 3 cupful s and mix it with 3 
well-beaten eggs, 3 tablespoonfuls of milk, 1 table- 
spoonful of melted butter, beat it very hard, salt to 
taste, thicken with flour enough to hold them to- 
gether. Fry in hot lard like you do fritters, or on a 
griddle like batter cakes. 

Corn Oysters. 

Grate the corn from 6 ears of corn, mix with it 2 
tablespoonfuls of flour, yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, 
season with salt and pepper. Have equal measures 
of lard and butter in a frying pan, and when hot 
drop in the corn in lumps size of an oyster, and fry 
brown. 

Corn and Tomatoes. 

Take equal quantities of green corn cut from the 
ear and tomatoes peeled and sliced, stew together 
half an hour, season with salt and very little sugar, 
stew twenty minutes longer, stir in a lump of but- 
ter, let stand two or three minutes, and take up and 
serve. 



80 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Corn Pudding. 

Cut nicely 6 large ears of corn, mix with 3 eggs 
well beaten, 2 cups of sweet milk, 1 tablespoonful of 
sugar, 1 tablespoonful of butter, salt to taste; bake 
in a buttered pudding pan, covered, about one hour ; 
uncover and brown nicely. You can make this pud- 
ding with canned corn in winter. 

Cucumbers. 

Select sound, firm cucumbers, peel and slice them 
crosswise in very thin slices, cut a few slices of on- 
ion, and place all together in salt water for an 
hour or more. Drain off the salt water; if cucum- 
bers are too salty, rinse them. Season with pepper 
and good vinegar and serve. 

Fried Cucumbers. 

Peel and lay the cucumbers in cold water half an 
hour, cut them lengthwise into slices J an inch thick, 
lay them in cold water a few minutes, wipe them 
dry with a cloth, season each slice with salt and 
pepper, dredge with flour or meal; fry a delicate 
brown in hot butter or nice lard. 

Stewed Tomatoes. 

Peel and cut up tomatoes, cutting out the hard 
part of cores, stew them in a saucepan half an hour, 
add 1 tablespoonful of butter, salt and sugar to 
taste; thicken it with bread crumbs. Cook slowly 
fifteen minutes and serve. If you like flavor of on- 
ion, add a little minced onion while it is cooking. 



VEGETABLES. 81 



Baked Tomatoes. 

Stew tomatoes, sweeten them, and butter very 
thin slices of bread or cold biscuit; hll a baking- 
pan with layers of buttered bread and stewed to- 
matoes, sprinkle it with flour and bits of butter and 
broTvn it nicely in the oven. 

Stuffed Tomatoes (No. 1). 

Select nice, large tomatoes, cut around the stem 
and remove part of inside, make a stuffing of any 
kind of cold cooked meat chopped fine, bread 
crumbs, green corn, minced onion, a well-beaten egg, 
butter, salt, and pepper. Fill the tomatoes with 
this dressing, put a piece of butter on top of each, 
and bake in a quick oven forty-five minutes. 

Stuffed Tomatoes (No. 2). 

Cut the stem part of tomatoes off, take out the 
heart and chop it fine, squeeze all the water out of 
it, chop up a small onion and put with it, make a 
mayonnaise dressing and mix with it. Fill each to- 
mato with the mixture, and serve as soon after mak- 
ing as possible, as they get watery by standing. 

Franklin, Tenn. MrS. GeORGE C. CoWAN. 

Broiled Tomatoes (No. 1). 

Select half-ripe tomatoes, cut them in slices, and 
sprinkle them with pepper and salt, then dip them 
into meal. Have a griddle very hot and broil the to- 
matoes in a little butter. This is a delightful break- 
fast dish. Mrs. Bettie L. Wilson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

6 



82 TMJNNESSEE MODEL HOmEHOLD GUIDE. 

Broiled Tomatoes (No. 2). 

Select large, firm tomatoes, wash but do not peel 
them, slice them J inch thick, broil on a hot griddle 
greased with butter. Have readj in a. cup a little 
hot butter seasoned with salt; after the tomatoes are 
broiled place them on a hot dish and pour over 
them the melted butter, and serve. Let each one 
season to taste with pepper, mustard, or sugar. Or 
dip the slices of tomato in beaten Gg^ and cracker 
crumbs before broiling. 

Onions. 

Peel nice white onions, put them in cold water, 
let come to a boil, pour off the water, put them in 
cold water and boil again until tender, drain dry, 
and sprinkle with pepper and salt; butter well and 
sei*ve. Or, when boiled tender, add a little milk, 
butter, pepper, and salt. Or peel, slice, and fry 
them in equal quantities of butter and lard until 
tender and a little brow^n. 

Okra (No. 1). 

Boil tender, white pods of okra a few minutes in 
enough water to cover them, drain off, add more 
water, salt, and boil until tender, drain well, dish it, 
sprinkle with pepper, butter freely, add a little vin- 
egar if you like, and serve. Or cut the pods in tvvo 
lengthwise, dip them in meal, and fry brown; or dip 
them in beaten ^gg and cracker crumbs and fry. 
Okra (No. 2). 

Boil the okra in salt water until tender, drain off 
the water, and pour over it J cup of vinegar, 1 tea- 
spoonful of butter, 1 teaspoonful of sugar, cover, 
and let boil up once. 

Nashville, Tenn. MkS. StEWART KiRKPATRICK. 



VEGETABLES. 83 



Rice. 
Pick and wash the rice well, let it stand in water 
awhile before cooking, drain, and put into boiling 
water slightly salted. Boil twenty minutes; do not 
stir it, but sliake it up hard to keep from scorching. 
When done drain off the water, set it on the stove, 
uncovered, where it will not burn, to dry a few min- 
utes; turn it into a dish, put a lump of butter in the 
middle, and serve. Or put rice in a pan, cover it 
well with hot water, add a little salt, set it in a 
steamer over hot water, cook twenty minutes, or 
until done, and dry. This is the safest way of pre- 
paring it. Some like a little cream and butter 
stirred into dry, boiled, or steamed rice just before 
serving it. 

Baked Rice. 

Boil 1 pint of sweet milk, mix 2 tablespoonfuls of 
corn meal in some cold milk and stir it in the boil- 
ing milk, add 1 tablespoonful of butter or lard, let it 
cool; then add 1 pint of cold boiled rice and 2 eggs 
well beaten, season with salt. Bake quickly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MaGGIE M. WeBBER. 

Macaroni (No. 1). 
Break the macaroni into pieces 1 or 2 inches long, 
put it in boiling water with a little salt, boil until 
tender, but not cooked to pieces. Drain well, put a 
layer in the bottom of a buttered pan or pudding 
dish, add a layer of grated cheese, a little salt, bits 
of butter, then more macaroni, and so on, filling the 
pan. Sprinkle the top layer with a thick layer of 
cracker crumbs, pour over it all 1 cup of cream or 
milk. Bake half an hour, until nicely browned, and 
serve in the same dish that it was baked In. 



8^1: T^NNUSSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Macaroni (No. 2). 
Boil the macaroni until well done, grate the 
cheese (a few crackers grated and mixed with the 
cheese is better than all cheese); place a layer of 
macaroni in a baking dish, then a layer of the cheese 
and cracker crumbs, with bits of butter, pepper, and 
salt. Continue with alternate layers until the dish 
is filled, then pour in 1' cup of sweet milk mixed 
with 4 or 5 eggs Avell beaten. Some like a little 
mustard mixed with it. Bake a nice brown. 

Nashville, Tcnn. MrS. THOMPSON AndERSON. 

Hominy. 
Hoak the hominy overnight in cold water; next 
morning put it in a pot with 2 quarts of water to I 
quart of hominy, boil slowly until it is soft, stir well, 
and often toward the last. When done drain, stir in 
salt and butter, and serve. Or fry cold boiled hom- 
iny and serve. Or add to cold boiled hominy 2 cu})s 
of milk, a little butter, sugar, and salt, and 3 eggs 
well beaten, mix well together, and bake it in a but- 
tered pan until firm and nicely browned. 

Lye Hominy. 

Put 1 peck of old, dry, ripe, hulled corn into a pot 
filled with water, and with 1 quart of w^ood ashes in 
a bag; let it soak aw^hile. Boil it until the hulls or 
skins come off, drain out the corn, wash it well in 
cold water to get off the taste of lye, boil it again in 
clear water with a little salt until soft. Mash 
some of it and serve hot; or fry it a little brown and 
serve. This is an old-fashioned dish, but is fine. 
Can be served with milk or cream. 



VEGETABLES. 85 



Feied Peaches. 
Select large, firm freestone peaches, halve them, 
and place them cup down in a skillet with a little hot 
butter or lard. When the edges are nicely brown 
turn them up and fill the cups with sugar; cook 
until done. 

Fried Apples. 
Wash and slice thin, nice, joic}" apples, put them 
in a frying pan with a little hot butter or lard, cover, 
and let cook slowly. Stir in a little sugar or mo- 
lasses just before they are quite done. 

Celery. 
Select nice, crisp w^hite heads of celery, cut off 
the tough stalks, roots, and green leaves, letting the 
bleached leaves remain. Wash and scrape the 
stalks, and place it in cold water until ready to send 
to table. Serve in a glass celery dish; let each per- 
son salt it for themselves. Some like celery stew^ed 
in boiling w^ater, adding cream, butter, salt, and 
pepper to taste. 



EGGS. 



TO ascertain freshness of eggs look at tlie sun or 
at a light through the egg. If you can trace 
distinctly the outline of the yolk, and if the white 
looks clear, it is good; otherwise, it is not. In shak- 
ing an egg, if it makes a sound, it is not good. Put 
them in a pan of cold water, and fresh eggs will sink; 
stale ones will rise or float on top. Keep eggs in a 
cool place. 

To Preserve Eggs. 

Take a piece of quicklime the size of a large lem- 
on, 2 cups of salt, put in a large vessel, slack it with 
1 gallon of boiling water, and it will boil and bubble 
until as thick as cream. When cold pour off the 
top, which will be clear, pour the liquor over the 
eggs in a stone jar, more than enough to cover them, 
keep under with a light weight; set the jar in a cool 
place. Eggs will keep several months this way. 

Boiled Eggs (No. 1). 
Put the eggs into boiling water with a spoon, be- 
ing careful not to crack them; boil three minutes 
for soft eggs, ten minutes for hard. Some boil eggs 
one hour for cold boiled eggs; say they are more 
healthy than when boiled just done. 

Boiled Eggs (No. 2). 
Place the eggs in a warm saucepan, cover them 
with boiling water, and let stand where they will 
(86) 



EGGS. 87 



keep warm, but not boil, for ten minutes. This will 
cook both whites and yellows. 

Fetzerton, Tenn. MaGGIE CoPELAND. 

Poached Eggs. 

Have perfectly clean a frying pan about J full of 
deary foiling water, salt a little, break the eggs one 
at a time in a saucer, slip them carefully into the 
boiling water; after all are in with a spoon pour a 
little of the hot water over the top of the eggs to set 
them. Boil three minutes or until the whites are 
firm; dip them out with a perforated skimmer, 
drain, and place them in a dish, season with butter, 
pepper, and salt. If you will add a little vinegar to 
the water before putting in the eggs, it will keep 
them from spreading. 

An Egg Scramble. 
Put I cup of sweet milk in a small saucepan and 
set it over the stove, stir 1 teaspoonful of flour into 
a little cold milk and add to the hot milk, together 
with 1 small tablespoonful of butter, a pinch of salt. 
Break in the mixture 3 eggs, give about three turns, 
and when cooked through serve. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. MrS. SaRAH L. InNIS. 

Scrambled Eggs. 
Break the eggs in a bowl, beat gently until yolks 
are broken, put 1 tablespoonful of butter into a fry- 
ing pan ; when hot turn in the eggs, and season with 
salt and pepper. Stir well until the eggs are set, 
and serve. Ann Eliza Hatcher. 

Eagle Creek, Tgin. ' 



88 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Fried Eggs. 

Put a lump of butter into a frying pan; when hot 

break the eggs, and drop them in carefully one at a 

time. Fry three minutes, place them on a heated 

dish, sprinkle with pepper and salt. 

Shirred Eggs. 

Heat a baking dish large enough to hold the num- 
ber of eggs to be cooked, grease it with butter, break 
the eggs carefully one at a time into a saucer, slip 
them into the hot dish, sprinkle them with salt and 
pepper; cook them in the oven three or four minutes. 
Or beat the eggs well, season, and bake them in a 
buttered dish. Either of these can be prepared in 
individual dishes. I have seen them baked in but- 
tered muffin rings. 

Pboached Eggs. 
Two eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of milk, J teaspoonful 
of salt, J teaspoonful of butter. Beat the eggs, add 
the salt and milk, put the butter in a small sauce- 
pan; when melted add the eggs, stir it until the 
mixture thickens, being careful not to let them 
cook hard-; cook about two minutes. When done 
should be soft and creamy. Maggie Copeland. 

Fetzerton, Tenn. 

Scalloped Eggs. 
Butter a baking dish, put in a layer of bread 
crumbs, a layer of sliced, cold, hard-boiled eggs, 
sprinkle it with pepper, salt, and bits of butter. 
Continue until the dish is nearly full, having a layer 
of crumbs on top; pour over it 1 cup of cream or 
milk, and brown it nicely in a moderate oven. You 
can add minced or ground ham or tongue to the 



BGGS. 89 



scallop. Or make a mixture of crumbs and meat, a 
little butter, moisten with milk, season, and till 
some greased pattypans or scallop shells with the 
mixture, break 1 egg carefully on top of each, sprin- 
kle with a little pepper, salt, and fine cracker crumbs 
over all. Bake in oven until the eggs are well set. 
Serve hot. 

Omelet. 
Beat 6 eggs separately, whites to a very stiff froth 
and yolks to a smooth light batter; add to the yolks 
1 tablespoonful of cornstarch, 1 teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder, 1 cup of sweet milk, season with salt, 
and lastly stir in the stiff-beaten whites. Have 
ready in a smooth, hot frying pan a lump of butter; 
Vvhen it hisses pour in the mixture, set it over the 
fire, but do not stir it ; let cook ten minutes. As the 
eggs set slip very carefully a broad-bladed knife 
under the bottom of the omelet to keep it from 
burning. As soon as the middle is set place the 
omelet in a hot oven. When done lay a hot dish 
bottom upw^ard on top of the pan and turn the ome- 
let out carefully, brown side up. Serve right away, 
as it will fall if allowed to stand. Never try to make 
a large omelet; it is better to have two small ones. 
This is for plain omelet. 

Mixed Omelets. 
Make mixture as for plain omelet, add to this for 
other kinds of omelets either of the following, 
cooked and minced fine: Turkey, chicken, ham, fish, 
or any kind of meat; use oysters not cooked before- 
hand. Also use grated cheese, bread crumbs, cold 
boiled rice, or hominy. Some use cold vegetables 
of different kinds chopped fine. 



90 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



Egg Omelet (No. 1). 
Beat G eggs, white and yolks separately; J pint of 
milk, 6 teaspoonfuls of cornstarcli, 1 teaspoonful of 
baking powder, a little salt; add the whites beaten 
stiff last. Cook in a little butter. 

Fetzerton, Teun. MaGGIE CoPELAND. 

Egg Omelet (No. 2). 
Beat separately whites and yolks of 2 eggs; -| cup 
of sweet milk, I teaspoonful of baking powder, a 
little salt. Mrs. Sarah Spence. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Stuffed Eggs. 
Boil the eggs hard done, cut them neatly in 
halves, make a paste with the yolks, melted butter, 
pepper, and salt. Mince fine cold chicken or any 
tender roasted meat, mix it with the paste, and fill 
the cavities in the eggs with it; press the halves to- 
gether. Grated cheese is a nice addition. Or you 
can split the eggs in halves lengthwise, fill them 
with the mixture, press the halves well together, dip 
them in beaten egg and fine bread crumbs, place 
them in a frying basket under boiling lard a few 
minutes, drain, and they are ready for use. 

Delightful Eggs. 
Boil 6 eggs twenty minutes, separate the yolks 
and whites, grate each or squeeze them through a 
potato masher; rub together 1 tablespoonful of 
flour, 1 tablespoonful of butter; add this to 1 pint of 
rich milk, and stir it over fire until thick. Put the 
whites into this, season with white pepper and salt. 
Have ready some stale light bread crumbs, put into 



EGGS. 91 



a greased baking dish a layer of crumbs, then the 
whites and cream, sprinkle with the yolks, use all 
the quantity this way, and on top sprinkle the yolks 
and bread crumbs, with pieces of butter to make it 
brown nicely. Put in the stove to finish, and serve 
hot. Mrs. Bettie L. Wilson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Vermicelli. 

6 hard-boiled eggs, 

1 pint of sweet milk, 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 

1 tablespoonful of flour, 

1 cup of grated bread crumbs. 
Cream the butter and flour together, heat the milk, 
and stir butter and flour in it. Season the bread 
crumbs with salt and pepper. Separate the yolks 
and whites of eggs and squeeze them through a po- 
tato masher. Put in a buttered pan alternate lay- 
ers of bread crumbs, whites, and yolks, and pour the 
milk over it. Reserve some of the yolks for top 
layer, put bits of butter over it, and set in stove to 
browm. Serve hot. Mattie Duncan. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



MILK, BUTTER, AND CHEESE. 

A COOL cellar is the best place to keep milk, if 
jou have no refrigerator. Milk will keep 
sweet longer in shallow vessels than in deep ones. 
If you scald sweet milk, it will keep it from souring 
so quickly. 

Clabber. 

Set a dish of skimmed milk away in a warm place, 
w^ell covered, until it turns or becomes smooth, firm 
clabber. Set it on ice one hour before using. Do 
not let it stand until the whey separates from the 
curd or gets sour. Lift it from the dish carefully 
with a large spoon,and serve in saucers with sugar 
sprinkled over it. Serve with cream and nutmeg if 

desired. 

To Preserve Butter. 

Work butter into small rolls, wrap each one well 
in a clean muslin cloth, and tie them with a string. 
Make 3 gallons of brine strong enough with salt to 
hold up an egg; add 1 tablespoonful of saltpeter, J 
cup of sugar; boil the brine, and when cold strain it. 
Put rolls of butter in a large jar, pour the brine over 
it so as to cover well, and place a weight over it to 
keep rolls under the brine. 

Cottage Cheese. 
Place buttermilk or clabber over the fire and 
scald just enough to separate the curd from the 
(92) 



MILK, BUTTER, AND CHEESE. 93 

water; take off and strain it through a cloth, but do 
not squeeze quite all of the moisture out. While it 
is hot season with butter, salt, and cream according 
to taste. Quite a nice dish when freshly made. 

Cheese Straws (No. 1). 

2 heaping tablespoonfuls of flour^ 

2 heaping tablespoonfuls of rich grated cheese, 

2 level tablespoonfuls of butter, 

1 salt spoonful of salt, 

J salt spoonful of mace, 

Cayenne pepper on point of pocketknife, 

legg. 
Work all together on platter, roll on board with a 
little flour, cut thin in rings or straws, and bake in 
hot oven. Mrs. W. F. Sowbll. 

Franklin, Tenn. 

Cheese Straw^s (No. 2). 
One cup of grated cheese, 1 cup of flour, a pinch of 
Cayenne pepper, 1 salt spoonful of salt, -J cup of but- 
ter; rub in as for pastry, roll thin, cut in strips, and 
bake quickly a light brown. 

Anderson, Tenn. MrS. RoBERT PuRDY. 

Cheese Fingers. 

1 cup of grated cheese, 

1 cup of sifted flour, 

1 teasj^oonful of baking powder, 

1 teaspoonful of butter. 
Enough sweet milk to make a soft dough; roll Van 
inch thick, cut in finger lengths, and bake in a mod- 
erate oven. Miss Martha Douglass. 

Nashville, Tenn« 



94 TE2^NESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Cheese Straws (No. 3). 
Mix 1 pint of flour, 1 pint of grated cheese, 1 large 
spoonful of lard, to a stiff dough with cold water, 
roll very thin, cut in narrow strips, and roll them 
under the hand or twist until round ; bake in moder- 
ate oven. Mrs. J. H. Enloe. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Cheese Scallop. 
2 cups of light bread crumbs, 
2 cups of sweet milk, 

1 cup of cheese minced fine, 

2 eggs well beaten. Salt. 

Mix well together, pour it into a greased tin, bake 
slowly until brown on top; serve from the tin it was 
baked in. 

Cheese Fondu. 
Melt 1 ounce of butter and whisk into it 1 pint of 
boiling milk. Dissolve 2 tablespoonfuls of flour in 
1 gill of cold milk, add to the boiled milk, and let 
cool. Beat the yolks of 4 eggs with 1 heaping 
teaspoonf ul of salt and pepper, mixed half and half, 
aud 5 ounces of grated cheese; whip whites of the 
eggs and add them. Pour the mixture in a deej) 
buttered dish, allowing 4 inches for rising. Bake 
twenty minutes, and serve immediately. 

Nashville, Tcnn. MrS. M. E. GrANTLAND. 

Cheese Biscuit. 

1 cup of grated cheese, 

1 cup of flour, 

f cup of butter, 

1 pinch of salt. 
Work all well together, roll out J an inch thick, cut 
with a small, fancy cutter; bake rather slowly a very 
delicate brown. Mrs. Martha Jones Gentry. 

Franklin, Tenn. 



BREADS. 

THE most important branch of culinary knowl- 
edge is certainly the ability to make good bread. 
It is wise to use none but best flour, and it should be 
kept dry, as the least bit of dampness affects it. 
Milk makes whiter bread than water, and does not 
dry so quickly. Milk should be heated before using. 
Water can be used instead of milk in all raised 
dough. When the receipt calls for sweet milk or 
cream, and you do not have it, you can use sour 
milk. In that case do not use baking powder, but 
soda instead, using 1 level teaspoonful of soda to 1 
pint of sour milk. When the receipt calls for bak- 
ing powder, and you do not have it, you can use 
cream of tartar and soda in proportion of 1 level tea- 
spoonful of soda to 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tar- 
tar. Flour dried in the sun makes lighter bread. 

Table for Cooking Bread. 
Bread, forty to sixty minutes. 
Bread (steamed brown), three hours. 
Biscuit, ten to twenty minutes. 

Moisten Loaf Bread. 
Always grease slightly the top of loaves or rolls 
before putting them to rise, or brush them over with 
sweet milk to keep them from hardening before they 

rise. 

(95) 



96 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

To Freshen Stale Bread. 
If not too stale, bread, rolls, and biscuit can be 
freshened by steaming them a few minutes and dry- 
ing them off in the oven, or dip them in cold water 
and place them in the oven until heated through. 

To Utilize Stale Bread. 
Stale bread, cakes, and crackers can be used in 
making bread puddings; or bread and crackers can 
be powdered for frying purposes. 

Bread Crumbs. 
Prepare bread crumbs as follows: Break stale 
bread into small bits, put them on a baking pan in a 
moderate oven, watch closely to keep them from 
scorching. Take them while hot and crisp, roll and 
sift them, placing the fine crumbs to themselves to 
use for frying chops, croquettes, oysters, etc. The 
coarse crumbs can be used for puddings. 

Self-rising Yeast. 
Tie 2 ounces of hops in a muslin bag, put them 
over the stove in 4 quarts of cold water, let boil one 
hour, and cool until lukewarm; take 4 cups of flour, 
work into a smooth paste with some of the warm 
liquor; beat into this 1 cup of sugar, 1 tablesx30onful 
of salt, beat well, add the rest of the liquor, cover it 
with a cloth, and let stand two days. Then boil 6 or 
8 Irish potatoes, peel and mash them well, stir them 
in the liquor a little at a time until smooth, strain it 
through a sieve, and let stand one day in the warm 
kitchen, stirring it often. Clean well and scald 
some bottles, bottle the yeast, cork tightly, and it is 
ready for use. Keep it in a cool place. This yeast will 



BREADS, 97 



keep for several weeks in a cool cellar, and does not 
need other jeast to start it. 

Potato Yeast. 
Peel 6 Irish potatoes, put them on the stove in 2 
quarts of cold water, let boil until potatoes are done, 
take them out, and leave the water on the stove. 
Mash the potatoes smooth with 4 tablespoonfuls of 
flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, using the hot water 
the potatoes were boiled in until all is used. When 
lukewarm add J cup of good j^east and let stand 
until it ferments; when through fermenting scald 
bottles and bottle the yeast, cork tightly, and keep 
it in a cold place. 

Yeast Cakes (No. 1). 
Cut up and wash 4 cups of Irish potatoes (peeling 
and all), put them on the stove in 8 cups of cold 
water, with 1 cup of hops tied in a muslin bag, and 
boil three-quarters of an hour. Take out the hops, 
mash the potatoes, mix them with the hot water, 
and strain it through a sieve; while it is hot stir in 
enough flour to make a stiff batter, beat well, add 2 
tablespoonfuls of good yeast, and set it in a warm 
place to rise. When light stir in 1 cup of sifted 
meal, roll it out 1 inch thick, cut in round cakes 3 
inches in diameter, and dry these in the hot sun. 
When good dry hang them up in a bag in a cool, dry 
place. Use 1 cake for 1 loaf of bread. Soak it in 
milk- warm water until soft, add a pinch of soda, and 
then mix. These cakes will keep several weeks in 
summer and longer in winter. You can use com- 
pressed yeast instead of making yeast cakes, if con- 
venient to g^t it fresh from groceries. 
7 



98 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Yeast Cakes (No. 2). 
For dried yeast take 4 medium-sized Irish pota- 
toes, peel, slice, and boil until done in 1 quart of 
water. Then take 1 quart of flour and scald with 
the water off the potatoes, mash the potatoes, and 
mix with the batter. Soak 2 yeast cakes and stir 
in when cool. Let this set overnight, and in the 
morning it will be light; then thicken with meal, 
and cut into cakes and dry, but not in the sun or 
oven. Mrs. W. W. Stephenson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Yeast and Bread. 
Peel, slice, and boil until done 4 medium-sized 
Irish potatoes in' 1 quart of water. Then take 1 
quart of flour and scald it with the water off the po- 
tatoes; mash the potatoes and mix with the batter. 
Soak 2 dried yeast cakes and stir in when cool ; let 
this set overnight. Next morning sift 4 quarts of 
flour, add a handful of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of 
salt, 2 tablespoonfuls of lard, 1 quart of warm 
water, and the yeast. Mix rather stiff and knead 
well, then put back into pan to rise. Let it come to 
top of pan, then knead well and make into loaves. 
This is enough for 5 good-sized loaves. Let rise, 
and bake one hour in a moderate oven. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. W. W. StEPHENSON. 

White Bread. 
Sift 2 quarts of flour, take out 1 cupful for knead- 
ing, mix with the balance of 2 quarts 1 teaspoonful 
of salt, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, and rub in well 1 
tablespoonful of butter or lard. Mix J cup of 
baker's yeast or J cake of dry hop or compressed 



BREADS, 99 



yeast with 1 pint of lukewarm water, pour it into 
middle of the flour, and mix it with a spoon until 
a soft dough, using more water or flour as may 
be needed. Knead well, set it in a warm place to 
rise overnight. By morning it should have about 
doubled its bulk. Knead it over with a little flour, 
shape into loaves, put into greased pans, grease the 
top of the bread slightly to keep moist, and set it in 
a warm place to rise. Bake in a moderate oven at 
first; when done turn it out and wrap it in a cloth. 

Milk Bread. 

Warm 1 quart of milk, add J cup of yeast or dis- 
solve in it J cake of compressed yeast, 1 tablespoon- 
f ul of sugar, 1 teaspoonf ul of salt, mix with 1 pint of 
flour, beat well, and let rise five or six hours. Melt 
2 tablespoonfuls of butter, work it into the sponge 
with a pinch of soda dissolved in water and enough 
flour to make a stiff dough. Let rise three or four 
hours, knead; and make into loaves; put into a 
greased pan, let rise, and bake. 

Buttermilk Bread. 

Heat 1 pint of buttermilk, add 4 tablespoonfuls of 
yeast; or, if you let it stand overnight, do not use 
yeast, but put in instead 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 
and stir in enough flour to make a thick batter. 
Next morning stir in 1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved 
in hot water, a little salt, and 2 tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter; work in enough flour to make dough 
stiff enough to handle. Knead well, make into 
loaves, let rise, and bake. 



100 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Graham Bread. 

Take 5 cups of unsifted Graham flour, 2 cups of 
white flour, 1 cup of meal (both sifted), and 1 tea- 
spoonful of salt; mix ^ cup of baker's yeast or J 
cake of compressed yeast with 1 pint of lukewarm 
water, add J cup of molasses, and pour this into the 
flour. Make into a soft dough and put to rise in a 
warm place overnight. It takes Graham bread 
longer to rise than white bread. Next morning, 
when the sponge has risen, add 1 teaspoonful of 
Boda dissolved in a little warm water, knead well 
with a little white or brown flour, make it into 
loaves, put into greased pans, and set it in a warm 
place to rise; let it take its time. Bake about one 
hour steadily, covering it at first with an old tin to 
prevent getting hard too fast on top. It takes 
longer to rise and longer to bake than white bread. 

Currant Bread. 

Make plain, homemade bread, and after it rises 
the first time roll it out and spread it with about 1 
teaspoonful of lard, then sugar and currants; repeat 
this until sweet enough. Let it rise the second 
time and bake one hour. Mrs. Alex Joseph. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Salt Rising Bread (No. 1). 

At night scald 1 cup of fresh milk, stir in enough 
meal to make a thick batter, sprinkle dry meal over 
the top, and set it in a warm place overnight. Next 
morning add 1 pint of warm water, J teaspoonful of 



BREADS. 101 



salt, thicken it with flour, pour it into a suitable 
vessel (stone is best, but a fruit jar will do), and 
set it in a vessel of warm water, which must be kept 
at a regular temperature. After setting one hour, 
if water rises on top of the yeast, stir in a little more 
flour. When it rises have ready the quantity of 
flour you wish to make (about 4 quarts of sifted 
flour, or more if you wish); mix with it J cup of su- 
gar, I cup of lard, 1 teaspoonful of salt; pour in the 
yeast and mix into a soft dough with warm water 
and milk mixed half and half, or all warm water, if 
you have no milk. Knead well, make into loaves, 
put into well-greased pans, grease the top of bread 
to keep it from hardening, set it in a warm place to 
rise, bake in a moderately hot oven. When done 
wrap it up to keep it moist. 



Salt Rising Bread (No. 2). 

Take 1 cup of new milk, let it boil, then stir in 2 
tablespoonfuls of meal, set it where it will keep 
warm enough to lighten. Next morning thin with 
warm water and add 2 or 8 tablespoonfuls of flour, 
i teaspoonful of salt; set it in a warm place, and 
it will rise quickly. Take 2 quarts of flour, 1 table- 
spoonful of lard, 1 teaspoonful of salt, mix with the 
yeast and warm milk enough to make a tolerably 
soft dough, and knead well. Grease the pan well, 
put in the bread and grease it on top, set it in a 
warm place to lighten, and when it is quite light put 
it to bake. You can make this rising in the morn- 
ing if you want it warm for supper. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. JoHNELLA CoRBETT. 



102 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Salt Eising Bread (No. 3). 
Scald and skim 1 pint of new milk; to this add 1 
pint of warm water; let the milk and water be pret- 
ty warm. Put this mixture in a half-gallon pitcher, 
then add enough sifted flour to make the consist- 
ency of cake batter, then add 2 tablespoonfuls of 
sifted stock meal, 1 level teaspoonful of coarse salt, 
3 teaspoonfuls of granulated sugar, beat all well to- 
gether, set the pitcher in a pot with enough warm 
water to come above the yeast in the pitcher, cover 
it all with a folded towel, and keep it the same tem- 
perature until the yeast rises to the top of the 
pitcher. Make this yeast about seven o'clock in the 
morning; look at it about twelve o'clock, and, if 
much water has risen on top, pour it off, and add 1 
tablespoonful of sifted meal. When the yeast is 
ready take about 3 quarts of sifted flour, add IJ tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, 1 large kitchen spoonful of sweet 
lard, mix it well into the flour, then pour in the 
yeast and work together rapidly, so the bread will 
not get cold; rinse the yeast from the pitcher with 
some quite hot water and add to the bread to make 
it soft enough, knead well until it is smooth; have 
your pans well greased and warm, make the bread 
into loaves or rolls as desired, place it in the pans, 
grease it on top with a little melted lard, and set it 
in a warm place to rise. When it has risen twice its 
size it is ready to bake. I have never failed in mak- 
ing this bread. Mrs. Fannie F. Helms. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Salt Eising Bread (No. 4). 
The evening before baking take 1 cup of meal, a 
pinch of soda, 1 teaspoonful of sugar, scald (not 



BREADS. 103 



boil) 1 cup of fresh milk, mix it while hot with the 
meal, and sprinkle dry meal over the top. Set it in 
the oven after it is about cold (or some warm place) 
overnight. Then take 1 pint of warm water, 1 pint 
of warm, fresh milk (or all warm water will do), mix 
and pour it into the batter prepared the evening be- 
fore; then mix with flour into a stiff batter. Set the 
vessel that contains the batter in a vessel of warm 
water, kept at the same temperature, and the sponge 
will rise in a short time. When well risen do not 
add more water, but have ready a pan of flour, J 
cup of lard, 1 teaspoonful of salt, a little sugar if 
you like, and mix it together with the yeast into a 
smooth dough; knead well. Make into loaves, put 
into well-greased pans, grease the top of bread, and 
set it in a w^arm place to rise. Bake in a moderate- 
ly hot oven. 

Rolls. 
In kneading yeast dough for the day's baking, after 
working in the risen sponge set aside enough for tea 
rolls, work into this 1 tablespoonful of butter or 
lard, and let stand in a mild place three or four 
hours. Knead it down, let stand three hours longer, 
make into rolls, put them in a greased pan, let rise, 
and bake steadily about half an hour. 

French Rolls. 
Warm 1 cup of sweet milk, add 1 tablespoonful of 
butter, 1 teaspoonful of salt; when cool add J cake 
of compressed yeast dissolved in a little warm 
water, 1 beaten egg, a little sugar, 1 pint of flour, 
beat well, set it in a warm place to rise; when light 
knead with more flour, form into rolls, put them in a 
greased pau, grease top of rolls, let rise, and bake. 



104 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Swiss Lips. 
Make a sponge of 1 cup of sweet milk boiled and 
cooled, 1 egg, a piece of compressed jeast as large 
as the end of the thumb dissolved in the milk after 
it is cool, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 3 pints of flour. 
Add sufficient flour to make a batter stiff enough to 
drop off a spoon, put into a bucket, cover, and set in a 
warm place to rise. Set this sponge by nine o'clock 
in the morning. After the sponge has risen take 
balance of the 3 pints of flour, a lump of butter size 
of an egg, J teaspoonful of salt, rub well together, 
pour in the sponge, work it well with the hands, 
have as stiff as biscuit, return it to the bucket, and 
set it in a warm place to rise again, which it will do 
in about 2 hours. Then put it on the biscuit table, 
work it, and roll about J inch thick, melt 1 teaspoon- 
ful of butter and rub on top of the dough, fold it 
over, and cut as for biscuit; place 1 inch apart in the 
pan, set it to rise again, which will take only a few 
minutes, then bake quickly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. D. H. McGaVOCK. 

Light Rolls. 
Scald 1 cup of sweet milk, let cool, stir in | cake 
of compressed yeast dissolved in warm water, a lit- 
tle salt, beat in flour (with a pinch of soda sifted in 
it) enough to make a stiff batter, let it stand over- 
night or until light and spongy. Then sift more 
flour with another pinch of soda sifted in it, work in 
lard and salt as for biscuit, then work it into the 
sponge, knead well, make into rolls, put them in a 
greased pan, grease the top of rolls, let rise, and 
bake right away. Or you can let it stand for some 



BREADS. 105 



time before making into rolls, and have them for 
dinner or tea, just as you choose. 

Parkee House Rolls (Unfermented). 
These rolls are made with baking powder. Stir 
in 1 quart of sifted flour, 3 large teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, 1 tablespoonful of cold butter, 1 tea- 
spoonful of salt, 1 teaspoonful of sugar, 1 egg well 
beaten; rub all well into the flour, pour in 1 pint of 
cold sweet milk, mix up quickly into a smooth 
dough, roll it out less than J inch thick, cut with a 
large biscuit cutter, spread soft butter on the top of 
each, fold one half over the other by doubling it, lay 
them apart on greased tins, rub a little sweet milk 
on the top to give a glaze, bake in a pretty hot oven. 

Dixon Springs, Tenn. NaNNIE ALEXANDER DeNNY. 

Tea Rolls. 
Two quarts of flour, into which rub a large tea- 
spoonful of lard, 1 pint of cold boiled milk, J cup of 
sugar, J cup of yeast; make a hole in the flour, pour 
in the liquid, and let it rise overnight. In the morn- 
ing knead and let it rise until noon; then knead and 
roll out, cut out with a round cutter, and butter one- 
half; turn the other half over on it, and let it rise 
until tea time. Bake in a quick oven. 

Chestnut Bluff, Tenn. MaRY C. WoRRELL. 

Rusk (No. 1). 
One-half pint of milk, 1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 
cup of sugar, 1 cup of yeast, 3 eggs well beaten, and 
flour enough to make a stiff dough ; when light knead 
and let rise again in the pan in which it is baked. 
Splendid. Mrs. Robert Purdy. 

Henderson, Tenn. 



106 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

EusK (No. 2). 
Make a sponge of 2 cups of warm milk, | cake of 
compressed yeast, and flour enough for a thin bat- 
ter; let it rise overnight. In the morning add, beat- 
en together, J cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, 3 beaten 
eggs, a little salt, and flour enough to make a soft 
dough; mold it into small balls with the hands, put 
them in a greased pan, let rise, and bake. 



Baking Powder Rusk. 
Sift together 3 cups of flour, 3 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 3 tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar. Rub in 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, 
add 3 beaten eggs, mix it into a soft dough with 2 
small cups of sweet milk, make into small rolls, put 
them in a greased pan, rub the tops with sugar 
moistened with a little water. Bake right away iir 
a moderately quick oven. 



Sally LunNo 

Three cups of flour, 1 cup of sugar, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of melted butter, 1 egg, 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar sifted in the flour; dissolve 1 teaspoonful of 
soda in J cup of water, 1 cup of sweet milk. Mix all 
together, stir it briskly until the batter is perfectly 
smooth, pour it into two pie pans well greased with 
butter, set it to rise fifteen minutes, bake in a hot 
oven. Mix 1 spoonful of cinnamon and 3 spoonfuls 
of sugar and sift it over the top while hot. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. H. C. ShAPARD. 



BREADS. 107 



Soda Biscuit. 

Put 1 teaspoonful of soda to 1 pint of buttermilk, 
sift flour, put in lard and salt to suit, mix the lard 
and flour, then pour in the milk, make a soft dough. 
Roll thin, cut out, and bake quickly. 

Fetzerton, Tenn. M. L. RyMER. 

Pulled Soda Biscuit. 

Prepare the dough just as for ordinary soda bis- 
cuit, only leaving out the soda, fix this the night be- 
fore, grease the dough, and let it stand overnight. 
Next morning pull the dough into a large, thin, flat 
cake, put it on the biscuit board, and sift the soda 
well, rub it fine in the hand, and sprinkle it over the 
dough; begin at one side and roll the dough up into 
a roll with the soda inside. Then pull it just as you 
would taffy, until soda is thoroughly mixed in ; then 
roll out and cut into shapes and bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. S. F. MgClay. 

Nashville, Tenn." 

Biscuit. 

Sift 1 quart of flour with 2 heaped teaspoonfuls of 
yeast powder, J teaspoonful of salt, 1 large table- 
spoonful of lard mixed thoroughly with the flour; 
make into a soft dough with clabber or buttermilk, 
roll thin, stick with a fork, bake brown in a quick 
oven. I always heat the pans, and make my own 
yeast powder by sifting four or five times J pound of 
best cream of tartar and J pound of soda (Arm and 
Hammer Brand). Mrs. Griff T. Jones. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



108 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Centennial Biscuit. 
Sift 1 quart of flour, 1 teaspoonful of soda (not 
heaped) sifted with flour, a pinch of salt, a lump of 
lard the size of a goose egg. Mix well with good 
buttermilk. Mrs. E. W. Bonham. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Baking Powder Biscuit. 
Sift together 1 quart of flour and 3 teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, J teaspoonful of salt, rub in 1 
heaping tablespoonful of butter or lard, mix it into 
a soft dough with 2 cups of sweet milk. Make 
quickly, work as little as possible to handle, roll out 
lightly, cut ^ inch thick, bake in a quick oven. 

Graham Biscuit. 
Sift together 3 cups of Graham flour, 1 cup of 
white flour, 3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, J tea- 
spoonful of salt, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, rub in 1 
heaping tablespoonful of lard, mix it into a soft 
dough with sweet milk, about 3 cups. Make quick- 
ly, work lightly, roll out J inch thick, cut, and bake 
in a quick oven. 

Sweet Potato Biscuit (No. 1). 
Boil or steam 2 or 3 potatoes until soft, peel, and 
mash them smooth, add J cup of sugar, 2 beaten 
eggs; sift together 4 cups of flour, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, J teaspoonful of salt, rub in 1 tablespoonful of 
lard, also the mashed potatoes, sugar, and eggs, mix 
it into dough with buttermilk. Roll J inch thick, 
cut out, and bake. 



BREADS. 109 



Sweet Potato Biscuit (No. 2). 

J cup of sugar, 

J cup of butter, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

2 cups of sweet potatoes mashed, 

1 cup of buttermilk, 

1 cup of liquid yeast, 

1 quart of flour, 

J teaspoonful of soda. 
Make into rolls, grease on top, set to rise overnight, 
and bake. Mrs. Thompson Anderson. 

Kashville, Tenn. 

Beaten Biscuit (No. 1). 
Sift 1 quart of flour, 1 teaspoonful of salt, a pinch 
of soda; mix well into this 2 heaping tablespooufuls 
of lard, (or 1 spoon of lard and 1 spoon of butter). 
Make into a stiff dough with cold sweet milk, (or cold 
water and milk mixed), can use all cold water but they 
do not brown so nicely. Beat it until the dough 
blisters, the more and quicker the better; sprinkle 
in more flour as you beat. Eoll ^ inch thick, cut the 
size desired, stick with a fork, and bake slowly. 

Beaten Biscuit (No. 2). 
One quart of flour, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 1 egg, 1 
tablespoonful of lard, and 1 tablespoonful of butter. 
Mix up these ingredients with skimmed milk, work 
them well together, and beat fifteen minutes. Stick 
with a fork and bake quickly. Mrs. C. W. McG. 

Franklin, Tenn. 

Wafers (No. 1). 
Make into a stiff dough 4 cups of flour, 2 table- 
spoonfuls of butter, a little salt, with sweet milk. 
Koll very thin, cut into round cakes, roll these as 
thin as can be handled, flour a baking pan, do not 
grease it, lay the wafers in, and bake q uickly. 



110 TENNESSEE MODEL HO USEHOLD G UIDE. 

Wafers (No. 2). 

4 spoonfuls of flour, 

4 spoonfuls of sugar, 

4 spoonfuls of cream, 

1 spoonful of butter. 

Season to taste with lemon or vanilla. 
Prepare as for pound cake. Bake in wafer irons, 
rolling them hot. Mrs. 0. W. McG. 

Fianklin, Tenn. 

Lemon Crackers. 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

2 tablespoonfuls of baking ammonia, 
5 cents' worth of oil of lemon. 
Beat the butter and sugar together, add the eggs, 
some flour, then the lemon, etc. Work in enough 
flour to make as stiff as can be worked and beat as 
in making beaten biscuit; roll very thin and cut as 
making other crackers. Miss Glass. 

Brownsville, Tenn. 

Cream Muffins. 
Beat 3 eggs very light, add 2 cups of milk, a little 
salt, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter or lard, lastly 
stir in lightly 2 heaping cups of flour sifted with 1 
teaspoonful of baking powder. Bake immediately 
in well-greased rings half filled with the batter. 

Fine Muffins. 
Sift together twice 4 cups of flour, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder; rub in 1 tablespoonful of butter or 



BREADS. Ill 



lard, add 3 tvell-heaten eggs, 3 cups of sweet milk. 
Mix quickly into a smooth batter a little thicker than 
for batter cakes, bake in well-greased rings two- 
thirds full of batter fifteen or twenty minutes. 

Plain Muffins. 
Beat 1 egg, add 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of butter, a little salt, beat until very light ; 
add 1 cup of milk, 3 cups of flour sifted with 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder. You can use one-half 
Graham flour or 1 cup of meal mixed with the white 
flour. Or you can use 1 cup of buttermilk with 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in it to make batter, in- 
stead of sweet milk and baking powder. 



POPOVERS. 

2 eggs well beaten, 

2 cups of sweet milk, 

2 cups of flour. 

Pinch of salt, 

1 teaspoonful of lard. 
Mix very light, bake in muffin rings. This will 
make 1 dozen muffins. 

Graham Gems (No. 1), 

1 egg well beaten, 

2 cups of Graham flour, 
1 cup of white flour, 

1 pint of buttermilk, 
1 tablespoonful of lard, 
1 level teaspoonful of soda. 

Nashyille, Tenn. MRS. StEWART KiRKPATRICK. 



112 TENNESSEE MODEL HO USEHOLD G UIDE. 

Graham Gems (No. 2). 
Sift together 2 cups of Graham flour, 1 cup of 
white flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking* powder, 1 ta- 
blespoonful of sugar, a little salt. Mix it into a thin 
batter with 1 well-beaten egg and sweet milk, add- 
ing a little melted lard. Bake in greased gem irons 
in a hot oven. 

Boston Brown Bread (No. 1). 
2 cups of meal, 
1 cup of flour, 

1 cup of molasses or sorghum, 
1 cup of buttermilk, 

1 tablespoonf ul of soda, 
A pinch of salt. 

Beat the soda and molasses together, then add the 
buttermilk, sift the meal and flour together. Then 
stir all together, pour it into a buttered pan with a 
buttered paper in bottom to prevent sticking. Steam 
three hours, dry it off in the oven, and serve hot. 
You can cook this while cooking dinner, and warm 
it over in the steamer for supper. 

Boston Brown Bread (No. 2). 

2 cups of sour milk, 

2 cups of Indian meal, 
1 cup of molasses, 
1 cup of rye or Graham flour, 
IJ teaspoonfuls of soda, sifted with 
J cup of white flour, 
1 teaspoonful of salt. 
Mix the molasses and sour milk, stir in the meal and 
flour, pour it into a buttered pan, steam three hours, 



BREADS. 113 



set it in the oven, and bake twenty or thirty min- 
utes. Jennie Bain. 

Fetzerton, Tenn. 



Corn Light Bread (No. 1). 

Boil J gallon of water, and pour into it meal made 
thin with water until a stiff mush is made; after 
cooking it about five or ten minutes remove from the 
fire and let cool slightly. Then pour in cold water 
until it is perfectly thin, salt a little, then stir in 
meal with 1 cup of flour until it is nearly as stiff as 
bread dough; cover all with a coat of dry meal and 
put it in a warm place to rise. This I make at night, 
and by morning it is ready for baking. Stir it well 
in the morning, add sugar and molasses until it is 
a little sweet. Bake in a quick oven. 

Kome,Tenu. MrS. J. A. KUTLAND 



Corn Light Bread (No. 2). 

Take the quantity of meal that you want to make 
into bread and with hot water (but not hot enough 
to scald the meal) make it about as stiff as you w^ould 
corn bread; put it in a covered vessel and set it 
in a warm place until it gets spongy and light; let 
it stand overnight if you w^ant to bake the bread in 
the morning. Then put in salt and soda as for corn 
bread, sweeten it a little with sugar or molasses, put 
it into a well-greased pan, and bake; it will rise as it 
bakes. Meal made in the country by water mills is 
much better than that made in cities, and makes 
much better bread. 
8 



114 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Corn Light Bread (No. 3). 
One quart of warm water to 1 pint of Graham 
flour, add enough corn meal to make a stiff batter; 
let this set all night. Next morning make it, add- 
ing meal and warm water to make as large a loaf as 
desired. Bake in a moderately hot oven. 

Cookeville, Tenn. MaRY E. HiNDS. 

JOHNNYCAKE. 

Mix 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of buttermilk, 1 tea- 
spoonful of salt, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter or 
sweet lard, 1 teaspoonful of soda, add enough sifted 
corn meal to make dough stiff enough to roll into a 
sheet i inch thick. Spread it on a buttered tin or 
shallow pan and bake forty minutes; as soon as it 
begins to brown baste it with a rag tied to a stick 
and dipped in melted butter. Baste it five or six 
times, until it is brown and crisp. Break or cut up, 
and serve for tea or luncheon. Or have a clean oak 
board, wet it with cold water, spread the dough on 
it, place the board in front of a hot fire, slanting it 
so that the cake will not fall off, until it has cooked 
a little, and then place it upright. Baste it several 
times with melted butter until it is nicely browned. 

Egg Bread. 
Sift 2 cups of corn meal with 1 teaspoonful of soda 
and a little salt, mix into a thin batter with butter- 
milk, stir in 1 teaspoonful of melted lard, and add 2 
eggs. Beat hard two minutes, pour it into a smooth, 
hot, well-greased pan, in which a little dry meal has 
been sprinkled, and bake quickly. Can bake it in 
muffin rings. Serve hot. 



BREADS. 115 



Fine Egg Bread. 
One quart of meal, 1 teaspoonful of soda, make 
stiff with sour milk and thin with warm water, add 
2 eggs, and a little salt. Mrs. C. W. MgG. 

Franklin, Tenn. 

Muffins. 

Sift together 2 cups of meal, 1 cup of flour, 1 ta- 
blespoonful of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 3 tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, mix into a batter with 
2 beaten eggs, 2 cups of sweet milk, add 1 table- 
spoonful of melted butter or lard. Bake in buttered 
muflQn rings. 

Corn Bread. 

Beat 3 eggs tliorouglily, add 2 tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 2J cups of sweet milk, 1 
tablespoonf ul of melted lard ; sift together 2 cups of 
meal, 1 cup of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, stir it into the eggs, etc. Beat hardy put it into 
a hot, greased pan, bake quickly. Serve hot. 

Good Corn Bread. 
One pint of meal, 1 dessert-spoonful of lard, salt, a 
pinch of soda, and 1 cup of buttermilk. Have just 
thick enough to make into pones. It must look 
smooth. It is better if mixed half an hour before 
cooking. Mrs. S. A. 0. 

Nashville, Tenn 

HOECAKE. 

Sift 2 cups of meal and ^ teaspoonful of salt, mix 
it with sweet milk and water, bake quickly on a hot 
greased griddle on which has been sprinkled a little 
dry meal. Serve hot. 



116 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Pone Corn Bread (No. 1). 
Sift 1 quart of meal, make into soft dough with 
cold water, add a little salt and melted lard, bake in 
small pones on a hot, greased griddle inside of the 
stove. Serve hot. Or sift with the meal 1 scant 
teaspoonful of soda, make into soft dough with but- 
termilk, add a little salt aiid melted lard, and bake 
in small pones as directed. 

Pone Corn Bread (No. 2). 
Sift 1 quart of pearl meal, 2 teaspoonfuls of salt; 
lard size of an egg. Pour on this 1 pint of boiling 
water, J pint of sweet milk; thin it with cold water, 
make into small pones ; cook on a greased griddle in 
a hot oven. Aunt Martha. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Aunt Dinah's Ash Cake. 
Mix as for pone corn bread, sweep clean a i)lace 
on the hearth, put the bread down on it, cover it 
with hot wood ashes; when done wash it while hot 
and wipe it dry with a cloth. Or put the dough in 
clean shucks and bake it in the hot ashes. 

Apple Bread. 
Sift together 1 quart of meal, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, J teaspoonful of salt, make into soft dough 
with buttermilk, add 1 cup of finely chopped apple, 
1 tablespoonful of sugar, and bake in small pones. 

Pumpkin Bread. 
Sift together 1 quart of meal, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, J teaspoonful of salt; make into soft dough 
with buttermilk, add 1 cup of stewed pumpkin and 
I tablespoonful of sugar; bake in small pones. 



BREADS. 11* 



Crackling Bread. 
Sift together 1 quart of meal, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, J teaspoonful of salt, make into soft dough 
with buttermilk, add 1 cup of nice, crisp minced 
cracklings; bake in small pones. 

Mush. 
Put 1 quart of fresh, clear water in a clean stew- 
pan over the fire, cover it, and let come to a 
boiling point, add 1 teaspoonful of salt and take off 
the scum from the top. Have fresh sweet meal 
sifted, take a handful of meal in one hand and a 
spoon in the other, stir the w^ater around with the 
spoon, and sprinkle in the meal by degrees. Con- 
tinue to stir and sprinkle in the meal until it is 
smooth and thick. Let it cook gently half an hour, 
stirring it now and then until done. Serve hot with 
butter or cold with milk. 

Mush Bread (No. 1). 
Make a small quantity of mush, quite thick, stir 
in a little sweet milk, 2 eggs well beaten, a little salt, 
heat the pan, grease it, pour in the bread and bake it 
quickly. Add a little flour if you want to bake it in 
little cakes like batter cakes. Serve immediately. 

Mush Bread (No. 2). 
Put 1 pint of sweet milk in a saucepan; when it 
comes to a boil make a thin mush with corn meal, 
cook it done, set aside to cool. Beat in one egg at 
a time till you have put in 3, add a piece of butter 
size of an egg, a little salt; bake in a deep dish. 
Serve as soon as baked. Maggie M. Webber^ 

Nashville, Tenn. ' 



118 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Fried Mush. 
Slice cold mush, dip it in flour, and fry in hot but- 
ter and lard mixed; turn it and brown both sides 
nicely. 

Oat Flakes. 

Put in a double saucepan 1 quart of boiling water, 
add J teaspoonful of salt, let boil; stir in gradually 
1 cup of flakes, and stir it well to keep from burn- 
ing; let boil twenty minutes. Serve with butter 
or cream and sugar. 

Oatmeal. 

Soak 1 cup of oatmeal in 1 quart of water, salt to 
taste, boil it in a double vessel half an hour or more; 
or steam it, starting it over cold water. 



BATTER CAKES, WAFFLES, AND TOASTS. 



HAVE all material on the table measured and 
ready. Let quickness be the rule. Beat brisk- 
ly, mix just as you are ready to send cakes to the 
table (except when yeast is used), bake, turn, and 
serve promptly. Griddle must be perfectly clean 
and wiped dry with a cloth before you place it on 
the stove; when warm grease it with fat salt pork 
stuck firml}^ on a fork. Do not put on more grease 
than is absolutely necessary to prevent the cakes 
from sticking. The fat should be hissing hot when 
the batter is poured in. Be sure that the cake is 
done before you turn it, as a twice-turned ^' griddle'^ 
is spoiled. Always lay hot cakes and waffles upon a 
hot plate as soon as baked. Toast should be made 
of stale bread, or at least of bread that has been 
baked a day. 

Waffles (No. 1). 

Sift together .3 cups of flour, J cup of meal, 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda, a little salt ; beat 3 eggs very light, 
add 2 cups of buttermilk, a little melted lard, and 
stir in the flour. If batter is too thick, put in more 
milk. Heat the waffle irons, grease them, and fry 
the waffles brown on both sides. Place on a hot 
plate and serve immediately. 

(119) 



120 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Waffles (No. 2). 
Sift together 4 cups of flour, 3 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 1 teaspoonful 
of sugar; add 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, 2 
cups of sweet milk, 6 well-beaten eggs; heat and 
grease the waffle irons, put in the batter, and bake 
brown on both sides. Serve as fast as baked. 

Waffles (No. 8). 
Sift 1 quart of flour in a bow^l, add a little salt, 
yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, 
and enough buttermilk to beat it with; beat it verj^ 
hard. Just before baking add 1 cup of buttermilk 
with 1 teaspoonful of soda; lastly add whites of the 
eggs well beaten. Bake very quickly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. THOMPSON AnDERSON. 

Light Waffles. 
To 1 quart of flour add 1 pint of warm (not hot) 
corn meal mush, salt to taste, 7 eggs beaten light 
separately, 1 cup of sweet cream, and fresh milk 
enough to make a thin batter. Stir cream and 
beaten yolks into the mush, add the flour and fresh 
milk, stir it well until perfectly smooth. The 
whites beaten stiff should be added just before 
cooking. The batter should be as thin as butter- 
milk, and waffle irons well heated and greased. Raw 
meal will not do; it must be made into mush, eggs 
beaten light, and the batter thin. Mix exactly by 
receipt, and you will have nice w^affles. 

EicE Waffles. 
To 2 cups of milk add 1 cup of boiled rice, 2 well- 
beaten eggs, a little salt, butter the size of a walnut. 



BATTER CAKES, WAFFLES, AND TOASTS. 121 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, sifted in enough 
flour to make a thin batter. 



Buckwheat Cakes. 
Sift together 2 cups of buckwheat flour, 1 cup of 
white flour, 3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, a lit- 
tle salt, mix together with sweet milk or water 
enough to make a soft batter. Bake at once on 
greased griddle; put them on a hot plate and serve. 

Raised Buckwheat Cakes. 
Mix well into a stiff batter with warm water or 
milk 3 cups of buckwheat flour, 1 cup of meal, a lit- 
tle salt, 2 tablespoonfuls of molasses, J cup of yeast 
or 4 cake of compressed yeast dissolved in a little 
tepid water. Set it to rise overnight; in the morn- 
ing stir in J teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot 
water. 

Sweet Milk Batter Cakes. 
Sift together 3 oups of flour, J cup of meal, 3 tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder; beat 3 eggs and add to 
S cups of sweet milk 1 tablespoonful of melted but- 
ter, 1 teaspoonful of salt. Mix into a smooth bat- 
ter, bake on a hot, greased griddle, browning both 
sides. 

Sour Milk Batter Cakes. 
Make batter of 2 cups of sour milk and flour, 2 
well-beaten eggs, J teaspoonful of salt, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of meal, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter or 
lard, 1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in water added 
last. Bake on a hot, greased griddle; brown both 
sides. 



122 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Biscuit Batter Cakes. 
Soak cold biscuit in cold water until soft, drain, 
and mash them; use 2 cups of mashed bread and 1 
cup of flour made into a batter with 2 beaten eggs, 1 
cup of sour milk, 1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 
water, a little salt; if the batter is too thick, add a 
little more milk. Or you can use sweet milk and 
baking powder instead of sour milk and soda. 

Bread Crumb Batter Cakes. 
Mix 3 cups of milk, 2 cups of stale bread crumbs, 
smooth, stir in 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, ;^ 
well-beaten eggs, J teaspoonful of salt, J cup of 
flour, or enough to bind the mixture. If too thick, 
add more milk. 

Graham Flour Batter Cakes. 
Sift together 2 cups of Graham flour, 1 cup of 
w^hite flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoonful of salt, add 3 well-beaten eggs, 1 table- 
spoonful of melted butter or lard, 3 cups of sweet 
milk. 

Famous "Beckwith" Batter Cakes. 
1 teaspoonful of soda, 
1 quart of fresh buttermilk, 
1 tablespoonful of melted lard, 

1 teaspoonful of salt, 

2 eggs. 

Add enough meal to make a batter that will mold 
itself as it drops from the spoon— that is, the batter 
should not be so thin that it will run, or so thick 
that you will have to spread it with a spoon. Some- 
times fresh buttermilk may be too sour; that will 



BATTER CAKES, WAFFLES, AND TOASTS. 123 



have to be corrected by adding a little more soda. 
Test the batter by dropping a little on griddle to 
see if there is enough soda or not. The bolted 
meal of cities is not as good as sifted country meal. 

Corn Meal Batter Cakes (No. 1). 
In a dry pan sift 1 teaspoonful of soda, pour on 
this 1 pint of buttermilk, put in enough meal for a 
thick (but not stiff) batter; add 1 egg, melted lard 
size of walnut, 1 teaspoonful of salt; stir just enough 
to mix. Grease the griddle slightly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. ShADB MuRRAY. 

Corn Meal Batter Cakes (No. 2). 
Pour boiling water on 2 cups of sifted meal, mix 
with 1 cup of flour, add a little melted lard, J tea- 
'spoonful of salt, 3 well-beaten eggs; thin it with 1 
cup or more of sour milk, beat till light. Add 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in water. You can use 
sweet milk and baking powder instead of sour milk 
and soda. 

Mush Batter Cakes. 

Sift meal and make mush; while hot add to 2 cups 
of mush a lump of butter size of an egg, stir in a 
little flour, salt, and well-beaten yolks of 3 eggs. 
Have the griddle very hot, just before baking add 
the stiff -beaten whites of the eggs, grease the grid- 
dle, and bake quickly. 

Toast. 

Take bread that has been baked at least one day, 
cut smoothly in slices J inch thick, butter each slice 
evenly with soft butter, put them in a pan in the 
oven until the bread is hot through; serve imme- 
diately. 



124 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Milk Toast. 
Put over the fire 2 cups of sweet milk ; when hot 
add 1 tablespoonful of butter rubbed with 1 tea- 
spoonful of flour and a little of the hot milk, let boil 
up, and remove from the fire. Have ready nicely 
browned slices of bread, dip each slice in the hot 
mixture; when all have been dipped pour what is 
left of the scalded milk over the toast. Cover, and 
send to the table hot. 

Egg Toast. 
Make nice buttered toast, put on each piece a 
poached egg, or have soft-boiled eggs and break one 
on each slice; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Serve 
hot. 

Oyster Toast. 
Prepare bread as for milk toast, also the milk; 
just before taking the milk from the stove put in 
the oysters, just long enough to get hot; put slices 
of toast on individual dishes, pour over them the 
hot milk and oysters. Serve hot. 

Cheese Toast. 
Toast slices of bread; cover them lightly with 
grated cheese; make a cream of 2 cups of milk and 1 
tablespoonful of flour; the milk should be hot and 
the flour mixed in a little cold milk or water before 
stirring it in. When the cream is nicely cooked 
season it with salt and butter, set the toast and 
cheese in the oven for three or four minutes, then 
take it up and pour the hot cream over it. Serve 
hot. 



Croquettes, Patties, and Sandwiches. 



CROQUETTES make a delicious supper dish or 
can be used for dinner. Thej are made of 
chicken, oysters, veal, or any kind of meat desired. 
They are also made of potatoes, rice, hominy, etc. 

To Fry Croquettes. 
Roll crackers until you have enough pie crumbs 
or use fine, stale bread crumbs; spread these on a 
large plate, beat 1 or 2 eggs in a bowl, and form the 
croquettes. Have ready over the fire a kettle con- 
taining 2 or 3 inches of boiling lard. As fast as the 
croquettes are formed roll them in the crumbs, then 
dip them in the Qgg, roll in the crumbs again, place 
them carefully in a frying basket, and place in the 
boiling lard so they are covered. Let remain one 
or two minutes until a light brown. 

Chicken Croquettes (No. 1). 
Boil your fowl well, chop as fine as possible, add 
salt, pepper, a little mace, ginger, and mustard, or 
a little chowchow pickle well drained. Add 4 
beaten eggs, a little flour, and bread crumbs. Stew 
all together a few minutes, and when cool make into 
cone-shaped balls, roll in pulverized cracker crumbs, 
and fry in hot lard. For the fowl you can substi- 
tute any cold meat. Mrs. C. W. McG. 

Franklin, Tenn, 

(125) 



126 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Chicken Croquettes (No. 2). 

About 1 cup of finely cut chicken (boiled or roast- 
ed) to 1 cup of sifted bread crumbs, 1 beaten egg, 
pepper and salt, and enough stock, gravy, or drawn 
butter to moisten. Make with floured hands into 
pear-shaped balls, roll in beaten eggs and crumbs, 
and fry. Or put 1 cup of cream or milk in a sauce- 
pan over the fire; when it boils up add 1 tablespoon- 
ful of butter mixed with 1 tablespoonful of flour. 
When it thickens take it from the fire, let it cool, 
season with pepper, salt, and very finely minced 
onion and parsley, add 1 cup of fine bread crumbs, 
2 cups of finely cut cooked chicken, 2 beaten eggs; 
form with floured hands, fry, and lay them on brown 
paper to absorb the grease. Use turkey the same 
way. 

Chicken Croquettes (No. 3). 

Put the chicken to boil in enough water to cover 
it; when well done pick it to pieces and mince it very 
fine. Take the water in which the chicken was 
boiled, to this add J pound of butter, J teaspoon- 
ful of Cayenne pepper, 2 oily nutmegs grated, a good- 
sized bunch of parsley finely minced, 1 red onion 
grated, 1 tablespoonful of celery seed, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of dry mustard, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 4 
eggs well beaten. Put this on the stove, adding the 
ingredients as above; put into this mixture as many 
bread crumbs as chicken minced, let it come to a 
good boil, stir in the chicken, and cook until real 
thick. Put it in a cool place to cool, mold into 
shape, rolling in well - beaten eggs and bread 
crumbs; fry in hot lard. Put to drain on brown 



CROQUETTES. PATTIES, A ND SANDWICHES. 127 

paper; when readj to use slip them for a few min- 
utes in a hot oven. Mbs. Byed Murray. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Fish Croquettes (No. 1). 
Use of cold cooked fish 2 cups minced fine;2 cups of 
bread crumbs or 2 cups of hot mashed Irish potatoes 
or 1 cup of each, 1 tablespoonful of butter, J cup of 
hot milk, 1 beaten egg, pepper and salt, if desired a 
little chopped parslej. Mix thoroughly; when cold 
make into balls, dip them in egg and crumbs and 
fry in hot lard. 

Fish Croquettes (No, 2), 
Boil until thoroughly done about 2J pounds of 
fish, red snapper for instance. Scrape off the skin 
and pick out all bones, putting the meat in another 
vessel for mixing. Stir into this meat a little over 
1 tablespoonful of butter, | cup of pulverized crack- 
er crumbs, 2 raw eggs, 1 cup of rich sweet milk or 
cream, 1 little onion grated fine, and salt and i^epper 
to taste. Mix thoroughly with the hands, make out 
into cakes like biscuit or round rolls, melt some but- 
ter and grease well, sprinkle with cracker crumbs, 
and bake in a hot oven. 

Nashville, Tenn. MiSS SaLLIE McClELLAND. 

Oyster Croquettes. 

Mix 1 cup of chopped raw oysters, 1 cup of minced 
cooked veal, 1 tablespoonful of butter, J cup of 
cracker crumbs, beaten yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of onion juice, and moisten it with oyster liquor. 
Shape, dip in egg and cracker crumbs, and fry. 



128 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Meat Croquettes. 
Cooked beef, shoat, veal, turkey, ham, or any kind 
of cooked meat can be made into croquettes. Sea- 
son as desired. 

Potato Croquettes. 
Boil Irish potatoes and mash them; when cort!'use 
2 cups of potatoes with 2 eggs well beaten, 1 table- 
spoonful of butter, salt, and pepper. Form into 
balls, dip into egg and crumbs, and fry. Arrange 
them on a dish in a pyramid and serve. Use cold 
boiled rice or hominy the same way, except you add 
a little sugar to the croquettes. 

Salmon Croquettes. 
Shred fine 1 can of salmon, add half as much 
mashed Irish potatoes and cracker crumbs, moisten 
it with cream or rich milk, season with salt, pepper, 
and butter, mold into egg shape, dip into beaten 
egg, roll in cracker or bread crumbs, fry a delicate 
brown. Fill a hot dish with enough fried Irish po- 
tatoes, sliced like straws, to represent a nest, lay 
your croquettes in this and serve at once. 

Brownsville, Tenn. MrS. A. W. BrOCKWAY. 

COQUILLE. 

To 1 boiled chicken add not quite 1 can of mush- 
rooms, cut up the latter, pour off liquor, and stew in 
water. Make white sauce of 2 tablespoonfuls of 
flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, and 1 tumbler of 
milk. Cut up the chicken, mix all together, put 
bread crumbs over the top, and bake in shells. 

Kashville, Tenti, MrS. S. A. O. 



CROQUETTES, PATTIES, AND SANDWICHES. 129 

To Utilize Cold Meats. 
Chop fine your cold meat, mix with it twice the 
quantity of bread crumbs, a little milk, sage, salt, 
and pepper. Mold into small cakes, dip in beaten 
egg, roll them in cracker crumbs, and fry in boiling 
lard. Mrs. Ellen Harrill. 

Langstou, Tenn. 

Chicken Patties (No. 1). 
Mince fine cold chicken, either boiled or roasted, 
season it with pepper and salt, a little minced pars- 
ley and onion. Make a dressing of J cup of butter 
to 1 chicken, 1 teaspoonful of celery seed, salt, and 
pepper; mix it thoroughly with the chicken prepared 
as above. Line patty pans with very rich pastry, 
put in the mixture, and bake to a light brown in a 
hot oven. Mrs. Byrd Murray. 

Nashville, Teim. 

Chicken Patties (No. 2). 

Mince fine the white part of cold chicken or tur- 
key, mince some cold boiled eggs and a little ham (or 
not, as you like). Mix together and moisten it with 
cream or butter, season with salt and pepper; have 
ready some puff-paste shells that have been baked 
in patty pans, set the shells on a hot dish and fill 
them with the mixture, sprinkle with bread crumbs 
on top, and brown lightly. 

Veal Patties. 

Chop some cold cooked veal and ham, season it 
with salt and pepper, add a few crumbs, moisten it 
with gravy or add a little butter and milk and beaten 
eg^j and let boil up once. Place the shells on a hot 
dish, fill them with the mixture, sprinkle on \o\) 
with crumbs, and brown lightly. 
9 



130 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Ham Patties. 

Mince 2 cups of cooked ham, mix it with 2 cups of 
bread crumbs, moisten it with milk, season, put the 
batter in greased gem pans, break 1 egg over each, 
sprinkle the top thickly with cracker crumbs, and 
bake until brow ned over. Or put 1 q^^ in the mix- 
ture and use shells as for other patties. 

Oyster Patties. 

Put the oysters in a saucepan with a little liquor, 

butter, pepper, salt, a little flour, 2 or 3 spoonfuls of 

cream, and let it come to a boil. Have shells ready, 

and proceed as for other patties. Serve hot. If you 

want closed patties, do not cook the mixture, but 

line the patty pans with pastry, fill them with the 

mixture, cover them with pastry, and bake until 

brown. 

Ham Sandwiches. 

Slice bread thin, trim off the crust, unless quite 
tender, butter them, lay between every two slices a 
thin slice of cold boiled ham, spread the meat with a 
little made mustard if you like. Or grind the ham, 
take yolks of hard-boiled eggs, squeeze them through 
a potato masher, mix them with the ground ham, 
add enough butter to make it spread nicely, if liked 
add a pinch of Cayenne, black pepper, and a little 
mustard. Cut the slices of bread, then cut them 
with a round cutter, leaving off all the crust, spread 
them with the mixture and fit together nicely. 
Quite nice for picnics. 

Ham and Chicken Sandwiches. 
Mince boiled ham and an equal portion of cold 
chicken, put into a saucepan, add a little butter, 



CROQUETTES, PATTIES , AND SANDWICHES. 131 

chicken gravy, cream, or water to moisten, season 
witli pepper. Stir it while it heats until very 
smooth, place it on a dish to cool; cut rounds of cold 
bread, butter one side of each, spread them with the 
mixture, and fit together nicely. You can use 
chicken without ham, adding a few celery seed if 
liked, or adding a little grated cheese. 

Sardine Sandwiches. 
Open boxes of sardines, drain off the oil, remove 
the sardines carefully so as not to break them, place 
them in hot water to free them from grease. Dry 
the sardines with a cloth, scrape off the skins, beat 
the sardines into a paste, season with pepper and 
salt if needed, spread between bread as for other 
sandwiches. Or chop the sardines fine, squeeze a 
few drops of lemon juice into them, spread between 
buttered bread or cold biscuit. 

Salmon Sandwiches. 
Take 1 can of salmon, season it with pepper and 
salt, spread it between buttered bread. 

Cheese Sandwiches. 
Grate J pound of cheese, add the yolks of 2 hard- 
boiled eggs mixed with a little butter, use a little 
water or vinegar (if liked) to moisten, season to taste 
with salt and pepper and a little mustard, mix well, 
and spread between cold biscuit. 



PASTRY AND PIES. 



TO make good pastry is in itself an accomplish- 
ment. The shortening should be fresh and 
hard, water cold (ice water is best), the paste rolled 
on a cold hoard. A stone or marble slab is a good 
thing to roll paste on. You must be dexterous, for 
much depends on the handling. Dip the hands in 
cold water before handling pastry. Touch it as little 
with your hands as possible. Put into the oven 
quickly or set it on ice until ready to bake. Do not 
have the oven too hot ; keep it at the same tempera- 
ture as long as the pastry is in it. If you let the 
oven cool, the under crust will be heavy. Fruit and 
filling should be cold when put into crust. 

Pastry (No. 1). 
Sift 4 cups of flour, chop or mix lightly into it 1 
cup of lard; wet it with ice water (about 1 cup) into 
a stiff dough, using a spoon until obliged to use your 
hands to make into a ball. Flour and knead into 
shape quickly and lightly as can be handled; flour 
the board or slab, place the paste on it, and roll it 
into a thin sheet, rolling it lighthj from you: spread 
butter over it with a knife, sprinkle with a little 
flour, roll it up or fold it over, roll out again, spread 
with butter, and sprinkle with flour as before, until 
you have used 1 cup of butter. Then roll it out 
ready for the pans, grease the pans, and place the 
paste lightly in them, cutting the edges with a knife 
to fit evenly. 
(132) 



PASTRY AND PIES. 133 

Pastry (No. 2). 
1 Qgg, yolk onlj, 
1 tablespoonful of sugar, 
1 tablespoonful of cornstarch, 
1 tablespoonful each of lard and butter, 
1 teacupf ul of sweet milk, 
1 teaspoonful of salt, 
1 teaspoonful of baking powder, 
1| pints of flour, or enough to make a 
rather stiff dough. 
Stir the egg, sugar, and milk together in a bowl. 
Mix the other ingredients with the flour, then i)ut 
them into a bowl and stir as stiff as you can with a 
spoon; turn it out on a floured molding board, work 
it smooth with the hands. If the crust is for meat 
I)ies, leave out the sugar. This pie crust is crisp 
without being greasy. Mrs. J. J. Fleming. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Puff Paste. 
Sift 4 cups of flour with 1 teaspoonful of baking 
powder, chop into it half of 1| cups of butter, stir 
the beaten yolk of 1 egg into J cup of ice water, mix 
into stiffs dough with a spoon, put on a floured board, 
roll it thin, and baste it with some of the remaining 
butter; sprinkle it with flour, roll again, and baste 
as before until the butter is used up. Roll the last 
time very thin, fold it up, and set it on ice or in a 
very cold place awhile before being used in making 
shapes. When shapes are baked bruvsh them with 
beaten white of egg and set them in the stove a min- 
ute. This paste is nice for any kind of meat or fruit 
patties. You can get the little shapes for baking it, 
which will be less trouble than forming them with- 
out. 



134 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

To Ice Pastry. 
To ice pastry for fruits to be spread on cold (or 
sweets of any kind) beat the white of 1 egg^ when 
the pastry is about done brush it over with the egg, 
sift a little powdered sugar over it, set it in the oven 
a few minutes, and watch carefully to keep it from 
burning. If you desire, you can mix the sugar with 
the egg instead of sifting it over after the egg is 
brushed on. 

Mince Meat Pies (No. 1). 
To 1 cup of finely chopped boiled beef, add | cup 
of minced beef suet, 2 cups of sugar, \ cup of molas- 
ses, 1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 cup of hot water, J 
cup of vinegar, 1 cup each of seeded raisins, cur- 
rants, minced citron, and finely chopped apples, 1 
teaspoonful each of ground cinnamon and allspice, \ 
teaspoonful each of grated nutmeg and ground cloves, 
a pinch of salt. Mix together well and let boil a few 
minutes, stirring it as it cooks. Bake on rich pastry 
with top crust. 

Mince Meat Pies (No. 2). 
To I cup of finely chopped boiled beef add ^ cujd 
of fine bread or cracker crumbs, 1 cup of sugar, \ 
cup of butter, ^ cup of jelly, 1 cup of hot water, 1 
cup of finely chopped apples, | cup each of seeded 
raisins, currants, and minced citron. Add spices to 
suit the taste — about ^ teaspoonful of each — or leave 
out if you wish. Mix together and let boil a few 
minutes stirring it well. Bake on pastry with strips 
of pastry across the top, or in patty pans lined with 
pastry, without a top crust of any kind, and sprinkle 
sugar over the tops while they are hot. 



PASTRY AND PIES. 135 

Mock Mince Pies. 

2 cups of cracker crumbs, 

1 cup of good molasses, 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of cold water, 
4 cup of apple vinegar, 
1 cup of seeded raisins, 
1 cup of currants, 

1 cup of citron minced fine, 
f cup of melted butter, 

2 large apples peeled and chopped fine. 
Boil all together a few minutes, take it from the fire, 
add the spices, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and a lit- 
tle salt. If too thick, add a little more water. Bake 
on pastry with strips of pastry across the top. As 
good as any mince-meat I ever ate, and very little 
trouble to prepare. 

Raisin Pie. 

To 1 pound of seeded raisins use 1 pint of good 
molasses, 2 cups of sugar, 4 eggs, 2 large tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, 1 good-sized apple chopped fine, 1 cup 
of vinegar, and 2 tablespoonfuls of ground spice. 
This makes 4 pies. Mrs. Len F. Davis. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Sliced Apple Pie. 

Peel, core, and slice thin, tart apples enough for a 
pie, line a pie dish with pastry, put in sliced apples, 
sprinkle heavily with sugar, a little flour, cinnamon 
or spice, and bits of butter. Pour in enough water 
to make it juicy, cover it with a top crust, stick it 
with a fork,.and bake slowly until done. 



136 TSNNi:SSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Green x\pple Pies. 
Grate 6 tart apples, add 1 cup of sugar, 2 beaten 
eggs, 3 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a little lem- 
on juice or vinegar, a few currants, a little spice, \ 
cup of water. Line the pie plates with pastry, fill 
them with the mixture, and bake without an upper 
crust. Or stew the apples, mash them smooth, 
sweeten to taste; while hot stir in 1 teaspoonful of 
butter for each pie, season with either spice, cinna- 
mon, or nutmeg to taste. When cool fill your crusts, 
crossbar the top with strips of paste, and bake. 
Eat cold with powdered sugar sprinkled over it. Or 
bake without a top crust of any kind; when done 
make a meringue of beaten whites of eggs and a little 
sugar for the top, spread it on, and set it in the oven 
a few minutes. Eat cold. 

Apple Custard Pies. 
To 3 cups of stewed apples when cool add 1 cup of 
sugar, the beaten yolks of 6 eggs, 3 cups of milk, 
season with nutmeg, lastly add the beaten whites, 
fill the crusts, and bake without a top crust. 

Mock Apple Pies. 

To 1 cup of fine cracker crumbs add 2 cups of cold 
water, 1 cup of sugar, juice of 1 lemon or 1 tea- 
spoonful of tartaric acid, season with nutmeg; fill 
the paste, put on a top crust, and bake. Can use 
vinegar instead of the lemon or tartaric acid. 

Peach Pie. 
Peel and cut the peaches, stew them until tender, 
and sweeten to taste. Line a baking dish with pas- 
try, put in the peaches, sprinkle with flour and bits 



PASTRY AND PIES. 137 



of butter, cover it with pastry, slit the top, bake 
slowly, mix together a little butter and sugar, and 
moisten the top crust with it while baking. 

Peach Cobbler. 
Line a deep baking pan with good pastry, fill it 
with sliced, ripe, juicy, plum peaches sweetened to 
taste, put on a top crust, make slits in it for steam to 
escape. Bake slowly. When done serve on a large 
flat dish. The crust will be broken in taking it out 
of the pan; place the crust on the dish, spread the 
peaches over it, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and 
serve, with or without sweetened cream. 

Peach Meringue Pies. 

Stew the peaches, sweeten them to taste, mash 
them smooth, season with nutmeg, fill a crust, and 
bake until done without a top crust. Make a me- 
ringue of whites of eggs beaten stiff and a little 
sugar, flavor with vanilla, spread it on the pie J inch 
thick, set it in the stove to brown lightly. Eat cold. 
Can use canned peaches. 

Fruit Turnovers. 

Make a nice puff paste, roll it out as for pie crust, 
cut out round the size of a small saucer; have the 
fruit stewed, sweetened, and cold; spread some of 
the fruit in a thick layer on half of the round of 
paste, wet the edges, fold it over, press the edges to- 
gether with a fork. Brush them over with the white 
of an eg£^, sprinkle with a little sugar, put in a bak- 
ing pan, bake briskly about twenty minutes. Turn- 
overs made of stewed dried fruit are nice fried brown 
in hot butter and lard mixed ; do not make the pas: 
try quite so rich for these. 



138 tennessee model household guide. 

Dried Apple or Peach Pies. 
To the beaten jolks of 4 eggs add 2 cups of sweet 
milk, I cup of melted butter, thicken this with nicely 
stewed dried apples or peaches well mashed, sweet- 
en to taste, season with nutmeg or cinnamon, and 
bake on pastry. Make a meringue of the whites of 
eggs and a little sugar for the top. 

Cherry Pies. 

Stew cherries in a little water until tender, sweet- 
en to taste, line pie plates with good pastry, fill them 
with the cherries, add a little of the sirup, put on a 
top crust, stick it with a fork, and bake. Serve with 
cold sirup of the stewed cherries. 
Berry Pies. 

Berry pies are made and served same as cherry 
^ies. Or fill pastry with alternate layers of thin 
slices of buttered bread and berries, and finish as 
directed for cherries. 

Gooseberry Tarts. 

Pick the stems and tops off the berries, put them 
in a porcelain kettle with just enough water to keep 
them from burning, stew slowly until done. Sweet- 
en well, let them stew^ awhile longer, let cool, and 
bake on pastry with a top crust. Eat cold. 

Cranberry Tarts. 
Wash and pick over the berries and proceed as di- 
rected for gooseberry tarts. 

Grape Pies. 
Pop the pulps out of the skins of the grapes into a 
dish, put the skins into another dish, then simmer 



PASTR Y AND PIES. 139 

the pulp over the lire uutil soft, strain it through a 
colander to separate from the seeds. Put the skins 
and pulp together, sweeten, and bake on pastry with 
a top crust. 

Rhubarb Pies. 

Skin the stalks, cut them in small pieces, wash it, 
and put it in a stewpan with a very little water, cook, 
mash it fine, sweeten to taste, season with a lump of 
butter, either cinnamon, spice, or nutmeg. Bake in 
I)astry with a top crust or crossbars of paste over 
the top. When done sprinkle the top with sugar. 

Tartlets or Fruit Patties. 
Line small pie tins or patty pans with puff paste, 
brush each one over with white of an eg^, sprinkle it 
with sugar (or not, as you like), and bake at once. 
When cold fill it with sweetened berries^ fruit, or 
jelly. Sprinkle over each tart a little sugar, and 
serve with cream. Or fill the baked shells with the 
fruit desired, cover with a meringue (made of 1 table- 
spoonful of sugar to the white of 1 egg beaten stiff), 
and brown it lightly in the oven. These are de- 
licious, and are more easily handled than large tarts. 
A nice addition to any meal. 

Green Tomato Pie. 
Take medium-sized tomatoes, wash them, cut out 
the stem end, peel and slice them thin. Have a bak- 
ing dish lined with pastry, put in a layer of toma- 
toes, sprinkle over it 1 cup of sugar and a little flour, 
put in I cup of butter, grate nutmeg over it, pour in 
1 teaspoonful of vinegar. Put on a top crust, bake 
in a moderately hot oven. Serve hot. Can use ripe 
or canned tomatoes the same way. 



140 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Sweet Potato Pie. 
Boil or steam firm sweet potatoes uutil uot quite 
done. Line a baking dish with rich paste, peel and 
slice the potatoes, put in a layer, sprinkle heavilj 
with sugar, a little flour, a pinch of salt, grate nut- 
meg over it, strew with bits, of butter. Make two 
layers in this way, pour over it a little water with 1 
tablespoonful of vinegar, cover with crust, and bake. 

Sweet Potato Custards. 
Boil or steam firm yellow potatoes until done; 
w^hen cold squeeze them through a potato masher 
or mash them through a sieve. Cream together IJ 
cups of sugar, J cup of butter, add to this 1 cup of 
mashed potatoes, 2 cups of sweet milk, 3 well-beaten 
eggs, season with cinnamon and nutmeg, J teaspoon- 
ful of salt. Bake in pie plates lined with rich pas- 
try or in patty pans lined with pastry; when done 
make a meringue for top. You can use the yolks of 
eggs for the custard and save the whites for the top. 
using more eggs. Let cool and serve. 

Irish Potato Custards. 
Mix, bake, and serve as you do sweet potato cus- 
tards. 

Pumpkin Custards. 

Press through a sieve 1 cup of stewed pumpkin, 
add to this 2 cups of sweet milk, 3 icelUheaten eggs, 1 
cup of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, sea- 
son with cinnamon, nutmeg, and mace, add a pinch 
of salt. Beat well together; if not sweet enough, 
add more sugar. Bake on pastry without a top crust. 
If you like, you can add a little molasses and not 
quite so much sugar. 



PASTRY AND PIES. 141 

Cream Custards. 
J cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 cups of sweet milk, 
Yolks of 8 eggs well beaten, 
1 tablespoonful of flour, 
Pincli of salt, 

Flavor to taste. 
Make a meringue of the whites of eggs for the top. 

CocoANUT Custards. 
1 cup of grated cocoanut, 

1 cup of powdered sugar, 

2 cups of sweet milk, 

3 eggs well beaten. 

Boil the milk, take it from the fire, stir in gradually 
the beaten eggs ; when nearly cold add the sugar and 
cocoanut, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, and bake 
on pastry about twenty minutes. 

Cocoanut Cream Pie. 
Sweeten and flavor 2 cups of cream, whip it to a 
stiff froth, add ^ cocoanut grated, spread it on ready- 
baked pastry shells. Needs no cooking. 

Clifton, Tenn. MrS. C. C. StRIBLING. 

Cocoanut Pie. 
To the whites of 5 eggs beaten to a stiff froth add 
1^ cups of sugar, 1 cup of melted butter, 1 quart of 
grated cocoanut, and enough sweet milk to thin it. 
Line your pans with rich crust, put in the stove, and 
bake a few minutes ; then add the above mixture and 
bake without top crust. Mrs. Len F. Davis. 

NashviUe, Tepn. 



142 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Buttermilk Custards (No. 1). 

2 cups of sugar, 
J cup of butter, 

3 tablespoonfuls of flour, 

5 eggs well beaten, 

2 cups of buttermilk or more, 
Flavor to taste. 
Bake on pastry without a top crust. 

Buttermilk Custards (No. 2). 
2 cups of sugar, 
J cup of melted butter, 
2 heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, 

6 eggs beaten separately. 
Buttermilk to make thin. 
Flavor to taste. 

Bake in bottom crusts. Mrs. Len F. Davis. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chess Pie. 
Yellows of 3 eggs and white of 1 egg beat to- 
gether; add 2 cups of sugar, a lump of butter the 
size of an egg, and 1 teaspoonful of vinegar. Beat 
well and bake in open crust. This is filling for one 
pie. Mrs. C. H. Rickman. 

Algood, Tenn. 

CocoANUT Chess Pie. 
Boil 2 cups of sugar fifteen minutes in 2 cups of 
water, stir in 2 cups of grated cocoanut, boil fifteen 
minutes longer; while warm stir in J cup of butter 
and add the yolks of 7 eggs well beaten. Bake in 
patty pans lined with puff paste. 



PASTRY AND PIES. 143 

Chocolate Pie. 

Filling — 2 eggs, 

1 cup of sugar, 

1 teaspoonf ul of flour, 

2 tablespoonfuls of milk, 

As much chocolate as desired. 

Union City, Tenn. MrS. W. S. CrITTENDON. 

Jam Pie. 

Put rich pastry in pan and cook done, spread a 
very thin layer of jam, either blackberiy or rasp- 
berry, whip up 4 cup of cream sweetened and fla- 
vored, and spread on top. Mrs. J. T. Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Sugar Pie. 

3 cups of light brown sugar, 
J cup of melted butter, 

J cup of cream or sweet milk, 

3 eggs well beaten, 

Season with lemon juice or vinegar, 

Beat well and bake on pastry. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. THOMPSON AnDERSON. 

Preserve Pie. 

1 cup of sugar, 

J cup of butter, 

J cup of cream, 

1 cup of acid preserves, 

Yolks of 2 eggs. 

Bake on pastry. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. FlORRIE DoDD. 



144 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Preserve Puffs. 
Eoll out puff paste very thin, cut it into round 
pieces, lay the fruit on each, fold over the paste, wet 
the edges with the white of egg, and close them. 
Lay them on a baking sheet, ice them, and bake 
about fifteen minutes. \ Mrs. M. C. Starnes. 

Franklin, Tenu. 

Jelly Custards (No. 1). 

4 eggs beaten separately, 

J cup of butter, 

1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of cream or sweet milk, 

1 cup of jelly, 

2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla. 

Cream the butter, add the sugar, then the beaten 
yolks, add the cream, then the jelly, and lastly the 
vanilla and beaten whites of the eggs. Bake on 
pastry. Can use 6 eggs, leaving out the whites of 3 
or 4 for meringue for the top, if desired. 
Jelly Custards (No. 2). 
Beat 3 eggs separately, add 1 cup of sugar, ^ cup 
of butter, 1 tablespoonful of corn meal, 1 teaspoou- 
ful each of vanilla and lemon; lastly beat in ^ cup of 
jelly. This makes two small custards. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. H. FULLTON. 

Jelly Custards (No. 3). 

1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

3 eggs well beaten, 

1 tablespoonful of melted butter, 
1 cup of jelly, cherry preserves, or jam, 
Beat together, flavor with lemon. 
You can use surplus sirup left from any kind of pre- 



PASTRY AND PIES. 145 



serves instead of the jelly or preserves, or sweetened 
fruit juice of any kind v^ill answer the same purpose. 

Lemon Custards (No. 1). 
2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of water, 

2 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch or flour, 
Yolks of 6 eggs, 

1 tablespoonful of melted butter, 

Juice of 2 lemons. 
Bake on pastry in small pie pans or patty pans; 
when done cover the tops with a meringue made of 
the beaten whites and a little sugar; set them in the 
oven and brown nicely. Do not bake the custards 
too long; have them so they will run on the plate a 
little when cut. 

Lemon Custards (No. 2). 
4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, 
8 level tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
Butter size of an egg. 
Juice of 1 large lemon. 
This will make two good custards. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. THOMPSON HiLL. 

Lemon Custards (No. 3). 
One cup of sugar, 2 heaping teaspoonfuls of corn- 
starch, yolks of 3 eggs, juice of 1 lemon, 3 table- 
spoonfuls of sweet milk, 3 small pieces of butter 
about as large as a bird egg', put in the butter after 
the custard is put into the pastry. When done add 
the whites as a meringue, using 1 tablespoonful of 
sugar to each white. This makes one custard. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. JoHNELLA CoRBETT. 

10 



146 ti:nn£:ssee model household guide. 

Lemon Custards (No, 4). 
Stir into 2 cups of sugar 1 heaijing tablespoonful 
of cornstarch; add the yolks of 6 eggs well beaten, 
beat thoroughly, then add the juice of 2 lemons, 3 
cups of water, and butter size of a walnut. Set this 
on the fire in another vessel containing boiling- 
water; cook until it thickens, remove from the fire, 
and when it cools pour it into the pans lined with 
pastry, and bake. Beat the whites stiff, add 3 table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, spread on the top of custards, 
and brown them lightly in the oven. 

Lemon Custards (No. 5). 

2 cups of sugar, 

8 eggs, 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 
J cup of flour, 

2 cups of water, 
2 lemons. 

Nashville, Teun. MrS. C. H. A. GeRDING. 

Caramel Custards. 
5 eggs beaten separately, 
1 cup of sugar, 
1 cup of butter, 

1 cup of preserves. 

This is put on crusts and cooked until done. 

Brownsville, Tenn. MiSS GlASS. 

Molasses Custards (No. 1). 

2 cups of molasses cooked half done, 
J cup of butter, 

^ cup of milk, 

3 eggs. 

Bake on crust. 

X.shville, Tenn. MkS. ByRD MUREAY. 



PASTRY AN D PIES, 14 7 

Molasses Custards (No. 2). 

2 cups of molasses, 

1 cup of sugar, 

6 eggs, 

Butter size of an egg. 
Melt the molasses, sugar, and butter together, let it 
cool, add the beaten eggs, bake on pastry without a 
top crust. 

Molasses Custards (No. 3). 
1 cup of molasses, 

1 cup of sugar, 

2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, 
4 tablespoonfuls of cream, 

3 eggs well beaten. 
This makes two custards. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. CoRA FitzhuGH. 



Puddings, Rolls, and Dumplings. 

PUDDINGS and dumplings are either baked, 
steamed, or boiled, if boiled, put into a but- 
tered mold, or dip a cloth bag into hot water, wring 
it slightly, and dredge the inside thickly with flour, 
put the pudding into it, tie bag firmly, allowing room 
for the pudding to swell; put it into boiling water, 
with a small plate in the bottom of the kettle to keep 
it from sticking. Cover it well and boil constantly, 
adding hoiling y>^ater as the water gets low. When. 
done dip it in cold water and turn it out immediately 
and serve. Dumplings are boiled the same way. 
Put them into separate cloths. To steam a pudding 
put it into a buttered pan (using paper on the bottom 
of the pan), tie a floured cloth over the top, put it 
into a steamer, and cover it closely. All puddings 
need a small pinch of salt. Baked pudding placed 
in a larger pan partly filled with water will not burn 
so easily. In making bread puddings soak the 
bread in cold milk or water. 

Pastry for Kolls or Dumplings. 
Sift 4 cups of flour with 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, rub into it 1 tablespoonful each of butter 
and lard; mix it with 2 cups of milk (or water), or 
enough to make a soft dough. 

Velvet Pudding. 
Boil 3 pints of milk, sweeten and flavor with va- 
nilla. Dissolve 4 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch in a 
(148) 



PUDDINGS, HOLDS, AND DUMPLINGS. 149 

little cold milk; beat well the jolks of 5 eggs, mix 
the cornstarch aud well-beaten yolks together, stir 
this into the boiling milk, and let it boil until firm, 
like blanc-mange. Pour it into a baking dish and 
set it aside to cool. Beat the whites with a little 
sugar to a stiff froth and spread it on the top of the 
pudding, and set it in the stove a few minutes to 
slightly brown. Serve cold with cream. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. THOMPSON AndERSON 

Dandy Pudding. 
Dissolve 1 tablespoonful of cornstarch in a little 
cold milk, stir tnis into 1 pint of boiling milk, then 
add yolks of 2 eggs well beaten with i cup of sugar. 
Beat the whites of 2 eggs with J cup of sugar, pour 
it on top, and set it in the oven to brown. Serve 
cold. Mrs. Sarah L. Innis. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. 

Snow Pudding. 
Soak J box of Cox's gelatin in 1 cup of cold 
water until it is soft, pour over it 2 cups of boiling- 
water, add juice of 2 or 3 lemons, 2 cups of sugar, 
and a small pinch of salt. Strain it into a dish, set 
it away for one hour or more in a cool place, but not 
so cold that it will congeal. Beat to a stiff froth the 
whites of 4 eggs, stir them a little at a time into the 
gelatin, whip it all to a stiff froth, pour it into one 
or several molds that have been wet with cold water, 
and set it upon ice to congeal. Serve with a cus- 
tard made of 2 cups of milk, yolks of 4 eggs, 4 table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, a pinch of salt, cook it in a 
double vessel, stirring it all the time until done. 
Let it get cold before using. 



150 ti:knesseb model household guide. 

Whipped Cream Pudding 
Split ladj fingers and line a dish with them; whip 
1 pint of cream sweetened and flavored. Put over 
lady fingers whites of 3 eggs well beaten, into which 
has been beaten 2 or 3 tablespoonfuls of jelly (plum, 
cherry, or blackberry). Put over the top the 
whipped cream, and finish with macaroons. 

Nashville, Tenn. SuSIE E. GlENN. 

Macaroon Pudding. 
1 pint of sweet milk, 

1 glass of sugar, 

4 eggs beaten separately, 

2 tablespoonfuls of Cooper's gelatin 
dissolved, 

J pound of macaroons. 
Beat the yolks of eggs with the sugar to a cream, 
pour in the gelatin, and beat very vigorously; then 
add the milk and set it on the stove until it comes to 
a boil; remove and let it cool. When cool stir in 
the stiff -beaten whites, and flavor. Into a dish pour 
a layer of this custard, then a layer of macaroons, 
alternating, until all the material is used. Set it in 
a cool place, and serve next day. 

Chestnut Bluff, Tenn. MrS. J. B. PaRKER. 

New York Pudding. 
4 cups of sweet milk, 
4 tablespoonsful of cornstarch, 
I cup of sugar, or sweeten to taste, 
4 eggs beaten very light, 
Flavor with vanilla. 

Dissolve the cornstarch in a little of the cold milk. 

put the rest of the milk in a double vessel, heat it to 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 151 

boiling, stir in the cornstarch, cook until it thickens, 
stirring it all the time. Take it from the fire, when 
it is cool add the beaten jolks of eggs and the sugar, 
a pinch of salt, and flavoring. Pour it into a but- 
tered dish and bake it fifteen or twenty minutes, just 
long enough to "set" the custard. Make a meringue 
of the beaten whites and a little sugar, spread it over 
the top of the pudding, and brown it lightly; or wait 
until the pudding is cold, and spread jelly or peaches 
over it, and the meringue on top of it all, and set it in 
the oven to brown lightly. Serve cold with cream. 
Queen Pudding. 
IJ cups of sugar, 
2 cups of fine dry bread crumbs, 
5 eggs, yolks only, 
1 quart of fresh rich milk, 
1 tablespoonful of butter. 
Bake it in a buttered pan until just done, put fruit 
over the top, cover it with whipped whites mixed 
with a little sugar, dry it in the oven a few minutes. 
Serve cold with cream. 

Rice Pudding. 
1 cup of rice boiled soft, 
1 tablespoonful of butter, 
1 cup of sugar, 
4 cups of sweet milk, 
4 eggs beaten very light, 
Flavor with cinnamon and nutmeg. 
Add J teaspoonful of salt. 
Bake in a buttered pudding dish until just done; be 
very careful not to bake it too long. A few seeded 
raisins chopped fine is a nice addition to this pud- 
ding. 



152 TENNESSEE MODEL HOVSEBOLD GUIDE. 

CocoANUT Pudding (No. 1). 

2 cups of sweet milk, 

4 cup of fine cracker or bread crumbs, 

J cup of grated cocoanut, 

J cup of sugar, 

Yolks of 2 eggs well beaten, 

Flavor to taste. 
Bake about half an hour, make a meringue of the 
whites of the eggs and a little white sugar, put it 
over the top, and set it in the stove to brown lightly. 
Serve with or without sauce. 

CocoANUT Pudding (No. 2). 

2 cups of bread crumbs, 

4 cups of sweet milk, 

1 cup of sugar, 

4 eggs beaten light, 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 

J teaspoonful of baking powder, 

1 cup of grated cocoanut, 

1 tablespoonful of flour. 
Bake in a buttered pudding dish about three-quar- 
ters of an hour. 

Chocolate Pudding (No. 1). 
Heat 3 cups of sweet milk to boiling, dissolve 2 
tablespoonfuls of cornstarch in 1 cup of cold milk, 
stir it into the hot milk, add 1 cup of sugar, 4 table- 
spoonfuls of grated chocolate dissolved in a little of 
the hot milk. Let cook until thick, stirring it all the 
time. Stir in gradually 2 well-beaten eggs, let it 
cook 2 or 3 minutes longer, remove it from the fire, 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AXD DUMPLINGS. 153 



flavor with vanilla, put it into wet molds, and set it 
on ice. Serve with cream. 

Chocolate Pudding (No. 2). 
3 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, 
3 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
3 tablespoonfuls of chocolate, 

1 pint of sweet milk. 

Put milk on stove to heat. Mix the sugar, choco- 
late, and cornstarch thoroughly together with 2 ta- 
blespoonfuls of cold milk, add this to the boiling 
milk, let cool until it thickens, stirring it well. Re- 
move from stove and stir in whites of 3 eggs well 
beaten and turn into a mold to cool. Then take the 
3 yolks and J cup of sugar and stir into 1 pint of boil- 
ing milk; boil until it forms a custard. Serve cold 
w^ith the pudding. Mrs. Sarah L. Innis. 

Mont Eagle, Tenu. 

Bread Pudding. 
3 cups of bread crumbs, 

2 cups of chopped apples, tart, 
1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of currants or jam, 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter cut into bits. 
Butter a pan, put in a layer of crumbs, apples, and 
currants and sprinkle it with sugar, a few bits of 
butter and cinnamon; so on until the pan is nearly 
full, leaving crumbs on top. Beat 2 eggs, add to 
enough sweet milk to moisten it all, and pour over 
it . (Hot water will do, if you have no milk.) Bake 
it in a moderately hot oven three-quarters of an hour, 
or steam \t and dry it off in the oven a few minutes. 
Serve with sauce. 



154 TUNNJESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

One-egg Cake Pudding. 
J cup of butter, 
1^ cups of sugar, 
1 cup of milk, 

1 eg^ well beaten, 

3 cups of flour sifted with 

2 heaped teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, 

1 cup of raisins or currants. 
Put in a greased pudding pan and bake or steam it. 
Serve with sauce. 

Jam Pudding (No. 1). 
I cup of butter, 
1 cup of sugar, 
1 cup of milk, 

4 eggs beaten separately, 

1 cup of strawberry or raspberry jam. 
Cream butter and sugar together, add milk, then 
yolks, whites, and jam. Put in a pudding dish and 
bake until brown. Serve with v/hipped cream or 
hard sauce. Mrs. H. White Hall. 

'•^ Nashville, Tenn. 

Jam Pudding (No. 2). 

3 eggs beaten separately, 

1 cup of sugar, 
J cup of butter, 

2 cups of flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 tablespoonful of milk, 

1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 

1 teaspoonful of spice, 

1 cup of jam. 
Bake in a well-greased pudding pan; serve with 
sauce. Mrs. Florrie Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 155 

English Pudding. 
3 eggs, yolks, 
1 cup of sugar, 
i cup of butter, 
IJ cups of flour, 
1 cup of blackberry jam, 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 
3 teaspoonfuls of buttermilk, 
1 tablespoonful of spices, 
Whites of 3 eggs for meringue on top. 
Serve with sauce. 

Ru88eUville, Tenn. MrS. W. H. DoAK. 

Black Pudding. 
1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of butter, 
Yolks of 3 eggs, 

2 cups of flour, 

1 cup of blackberry jam, 
1 tablespoonful of buttermilk, 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 
water. 
Spice well with cinnamon, cloves, etc. Bake it 
slowly thirty or forty minutes. Use the white of 
eggs for a meringue on top. Mrs. W. G. Currie. 

Cookeville, Tenn. 

Peach Cottage Pudding. 
Stir sliced peaches into a batter made of J cup of 
sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, 1 beaten 
egg, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 pint of flour sifted with 
IJ teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake in a loaf, 
and serve with hard sauce. Mrs. Hettie Speck. 

[Livingston, tenn. 



L56 TENNESSEE 310 DEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Cottage Pudding. 
i cup of butter^ 
1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of milk, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

1 pint of flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Flavor to taste; serve with sauce. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. ByED MuRRAY. 

Fruit Pudding. 
Cut in pieces 1 orange, 1 banana, 2 figs, a few rai- 
sins, a few nuts of any kind. Soak ^ box of gelatin 
in J pint of cold water, add J pint of hot water, 
sweeten and flavor to taste, pour it on the fruit, and 
let it stand in a cold place until stiff. Make a boiled 
custard of 3 eggs (leaving out the whites of 2 eggs 
for frosting) and some fresh milk, sweetened to 
taste. Turn the fruit and jelly into a dish, pour on 
the custard, and put the beaten whites on top. 

Steamed Fruit Pudding (No. 1). 
Sift together 2 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder, J teaspoonful of salt; mix well 2 beaten 
eggs, J cup of sugar, -| cup of butter, 1 cup of sweet 
milk, stir in the flour, add 2 cups of any kind of 
fruit preferred, such as berries, cherries, peaches cut 
fine, chopped sour apples, seeded prunes, dates or 
raisins, and currants. Sprinkle the fruit with flour 
and stir it into the batter, pour the batter into a but- 
tered pan and steam it three hours ; or put it into a 
buttered can or tin bucket that can be put into a pot 
of boiling water, cover it closely, and let boil three 
hours. Serve with sauce. 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 157 

Steamed Fruit Pudding (No. 2). 
Sift 1 quart of flour with 2 teaspoonf uls of baking 
powder, a little salt, and w^ork into this J cup of 
lard, mix it with sweet milk into a soft pastry. Lay 
this over sweetened berries in a tin pan and steam 
it over boiling water one hour. This pudding can 
be made of any kind of fruit. Serve with hard 
sauce. Mrs. Alex Joseph. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Suet Pudding. 
Four cups of flour, 1 cup of beef suet chopped 
fine, 1 cup of raisins or cherries, 1 cup of molasses, 
1 cup of lukewarm water, 1 large teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder. Mix the flour and suet together, add 
the molasses and water, then the raisins well floured 
with a part of the flour reserved for dredging, and 
lastly add the baking powder with a little of the 
flour. Dip the pudding bag in cold water and flour 
it inside well, put in w^arm water and let boil three 
houi's. In dishing it turn it out on one dish, then 
transfer it to another, to prevent having any water 
in the dish with it. Mrs. Thompson Anderson. 

Kashville, Tenn. 

Fig Pudding. 

Beat 2 eggs light, add 1 cup of milk, 2 cups of flour 
sifted with 1 heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, 
J teaspoonful of salt. Beat it very smooth, add J 
pound of chopped figs floured; put in a greased mold, 
boil or steam it two hours. Serve with sauce made 
by whipping together 1 large tablespoonful of but- 
ter, 1 heaping cup of powdered sugar, and 1 egg. 
Dates and prunes also make a delightful pudding. 

Nashvill^,Tenn. MrS. PhILIP HiLL. 



158 TENNESSEE 3I0DEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Plum Pudding (No. 1). 

1 cup of finely chopped beef suet, 

2 cups of fine bread crumbs, 
1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of seeded raisins, 

1 cup of well- washed currants, 

1 cup of chopped blanched almonds, 

J cup of citron chopped fine, 

1 teaspoonful of salt, 

1 teaspoonful of cloves, 

2 teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 

J teaspoonful of grated nutmeg, 

4 eggs well beaten. 
Flour the fruit thoroughly with 1 cup of flour, beat 
the eggs, add the sugar, spices, salt, and 1 cup of 
milk, stir in the bread crumbs, suet, fruits, and 
chopped nuts until all are used. Stir in 1 teaspoon- 
ful of soda dissolved in warm water, add 1 cup of 
flour or enough to make the fruits stick together. 
Put into a buttered mold, or wet a bag in hot water, 
flour the inside, pour the pudding into it, tie it, boil 
or steam it four hours. Serve with sauce. 

Plum Pudding (No. 2). 
1 cup of butter, 
1 cup of sugar, 
G eggs beaten separately, 
4 cups of flour, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 
\ cup of jelly, 

■I pound of suet chopped fine, 
1 pound of raisins, seeded, chopped, and 
floured. 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 159 

1 pound of curiants, washed, dried, and 

floured, 

2 ounces of citron cut very fine, 
1 nutmeg grated, 

1 teaspoonful of ground cloves, 
1 teaspoonful of ground mace. 
Cream butter and sugar, add the beaten yolks, then 
milk and flour alternately with the beaten whites, 
then add jelly and spices, and lastly the floured 
fruit. Boil five hours ; serve with sauce. 

*Nashville, Tenn. MrS. StEWART KIRKPATRICK. 



Plum Pudding (No. 3). 

J cup of molasses, 

J cup of brown sugar, 

4 eggs well beaten, 

1 cup of flour, 

J cup of sweet milk, 

J pound of beef suet chopped fine, 

J pound of bread crumbs, 

1 teaspoonful of salt, 

2 teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 
1 teaspoonful of cloves, 

1 teaspoonful of mace, 
1 candied lemon peel, 
1 candied orange peel, 
I pound of raisins seeded and chopped, 
J pound of currants washed and dried, 
1 heaped tablespoonful of citron. 
Boil six hours, and serve with sauce. 



160 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 
Ginger Pudding (No. 1). 

4 cup of butter or lard, 
1 cup of brown sugar, 
1 cup of molasses with 

1 teaspoonful of soda beat in it, 
J cup of sour milk, 

4 eggs well beaten, 

2 tablespoonfuls of ginger, 

Flour enough to make consistency of 

cake batter. 
Serve with sauce. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. H. FuLLTON. 



Ginger Pudding (No. 2). 

1 cup of butter or lard, 

1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of black molasses, 

1 cup of buttermilk, 

IJ teaspoonfuls of soda dissolved in 

hot water, 
1 tablespoonful of ground ginger, 

1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
5 cups of flour, little salt, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

1 cup of currants or jam, if liked. 
Put in a cake pan with a spout in center, put paper 
in the bottom of the pan and grease it before putting 
in the batter, bake in a moderately hot oven or steam 
it until done. Serve with sauce. 



PUDDINGS, R OLLS, AND DUMPLINGS, 161 

Peach Pudding (No. 1). 
Drain liquor from 1 quart can of peaches into a 
quart cup, fill the cup with new milk, stir into this 
the jolks of 5 eggs and 1 cup of sugar, boil the mix- 
ture, and stir in 3 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch dis- 
solved in a little cold milk. When it boils well pour 
into an earthen pudding dish and bake half an hour. 
Place a thick layer of the peaches on top, cover with 
a meringue made of the whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff 
with 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar. Let brown lightly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. H. FuLLTON. 

Peach Pudding (No. 2). 

Prepare 1 pint of flour by sifting with 1 teaspoon - 
f ul of baking powder and a pinch of salt ; then rub 1 
teaspoonful of butter through it; add 1 beaten egg 
to I cup of milk, thicken with the prepared flour, and 
pour into a buttered baking pan. Arrange the 
peaches over the top, cut side up, and put a drop of 
vanilla extract in each; fill with sugar, lay a bit of 
butter on the center of each piece, and bake in a hot 
oven. Serve hot with plain sweetened cream or 
vanilla sauce. Mrs. Ava Herstein. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Prune Pudding (No. 1). 

Take 1 pound of prunes and boil till tender, add- 
ing a pinch of soda; strain off water, seed and chip 
fine. Beat the whites of 3 eggs, add 1 cup of sugar 
to whites, and mix with the chopped prunes. Put 
into a pudding dish and bake immediately. Serve 
with cream. Mrs. Alex M. Kal8T0N. 

Nashville, Tenn. 
11 • 



162 TENNESSEE MODEL HO USER OLD G UIDE. 

Prune Pudding (No. 2). 
Stew 1 pound of prunes well done the day pre- 
vious, drain off the juice, seed and chop them fine. 
Beat well the whites of 6 eggs, add 1 cup of sugar to 
them, and then the chopped prunes. Cook in a 
steamer one hour. Serve with the following dress- 
ing : Yolks of the 6 eggs well beaten, add J cup of su- 
gar, stir this into 1 pint of boiling milk, let cook two 
or three minutes, stirring it constantly. Flavor 
with vanilla. Mbs. J. L. Kirby. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Cranberry Pudding. 
Cream ^ cup of butter, add slowly 1 cup of sugar, 
then add 3 eggs well beaten. Sift 3 teasijoonfuls of 
baking powder with 3J cups of flour, add this to the 
mixture alternately with J cup of milk. Wash and 
dry 2 cups of cranberries, flour them with a little of 
the flour measured, and add them to the batter. 
Put into a buttered mold, set it in a kettle of boiling 
water, cover tightly, and let steam two hours. 
Serve with sauce or sweetened cream flavored with 
a little grated nutmeg. This pudding can be baked, 

if baked slowly. 

Orange Pudding. 

Cut a sponge cake into slices across, peel oranges 
and cut them into slices across, removing the seed. 
Spread the bottom of a dish with a layer of cake, 
then slices of orange, sprinkle with sugar, and so on 
until the pudding is the size desired. Make a me- 
ringue of whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff and a little 
sugar; pour it over the pudding and set it in the 
oven to brown lightly. Serve with sauce. Other 
fruits can be used the same way. 



PUDDINGS, BOLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 163 

Banana Pudding. 

Cut sponge cake in slices, and in a glass dish 
put alternate layers of sponge cake and sliced ba- 
nanas; squeeze a little lemon juice over the bananas 
and sprinkle with a little sugar. Cook a soft cus- 
tard of the yolks of 4 or 5 eggs, a little milk, and a 
little sugar, flavor to taste, and pour over it. Beat 
the whites of eggs stiff and heap over the whole. 

Sponge Roll (No. 1). 

5 eggs beaten separately, 

1 cup of sugar added to yolks, 

1 cup of flour sifted. 

Add the well-beaten whites last; stir very lightly 
and as little as possible in mixing. Bake in biscuit 
pan. When done turn out on a damp cloth, spread 
with jelly or plum preserves, roll it up, and serve 
with sauce. Idah Lee Kirkpatrick. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Sponge Roll (No. 2). 

6 eggs beaten separately, 

2 cups of sugar, 

2 cups of flour sifted with 
2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
4 tablespoonfuls sweet milk or water. 
Beat the yolks, add the sugar and milk, and beat to- 
gether; beat the whites to a stiff froth, then thor- 
oughly with the yolks and sugar, then stir in lightly 
the flour, flavor, and bake in a thin layer in a large 
biscuit pan. Turn it out on a damp cloth, spread it 
with jelly, and roll it up quickly while it is hot. Cut 
in slices crosswise and serve with sauce. 



164 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



CocoANUT Sponge Roll. 

5 eggs beaten separately, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3J cups of sifted flour, 

f cup of boiling water, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder sifted 
in the flour. 
Beat yolks and sugar together, add stiff-beaten 
whites, the boiling water, and stir the flour in very 
lightly; stir just as little as possible to get it mixed 
in. Bake in a large biscuit pan. Have icing ready 
(cooked or not, as you like), spread the cake while 
warm with the icing, and sprinkle heavily with grat- 
ed cocoanut; roll it and ice the outside and sprinkle 
cocoanut over it. Peel and slice oranges and serve 
with cake sliced. Miss Martha Douglass. 

Nashville, Teiin. 

Fruit Rolls. 
Roll out the pastry into an oblong sheet, cover it 
thickly with a layer of fruit, v/ithout juice, sprinkle 
it with sugar, begin at one end and roll it up closely 
with the fruit inside. Wet the ends of the dough 
and turn them up closely so the fruit will not run 
out. Bake as you would dumplings, only cook it 
longer; or tie it up in an oblong cloth which has been 
wet in hot water and floured on the inside and boll 
or steam it two hours. Serve hot with sauce; cut it 
crosswise in slices. If you use apples, peaches, or 
pears, peel, slice, and chop them. Stewed dried 
fruit, seeded cherries, plums, and berries of all 
kinds may be used in rolls or dumplings. 

Fig Roll. 
Make the pastry, roll it out, chop the figs fine and 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 165 

spread them on the pastry, leaving a few figs for the 
sauce. Roll it up and bake or boil it. Serve with 
sauce, adding to it the figs saved. Seeded raisins 
can be used the same way; and if you will add grat- 
ed cocoanut, it makes a delightful roll. 

Apple Dumplings. 
Make a biscuit dough, onlj' add more shortening, 
take a piece of the dough, roll it out like pie crust, 
cut into rounds the size of a large saucer; put in the 
middle of each piece 2 halves of tart apples that 
have been peeled and cored, sprinkle in a little sugar 
and ground cinnamon, turn the dough up over the 
apple, leaving a small opening in the center for 
steam to escape. Lay the dumplings in a buttered 
pan, put a small piece of butter on top of each, and 
sprinkle over them J cup of sugar; pour in 1 cup of 
boiling water. Bake in moderate oven three-quar- 
ters ef an hour. Serve with sauce or cream and 
sugar. Peach dumplings are made the same way. 

Berry Dumplings. 
Berry dumplings are made and served in the same 
way that apple dumplings are prepared, either 
baked, steamed, or boiled. 

Snow Dumplings. 
Peel tart apples and core them ; wash 1 pint of rice 
and roll the apples in it so that the rice will adhere. 
Have ready a nice short pastry, wrap the apples in a 
piece of the dough, and roll the dumplings in the rice 
again, and so on till you have the number desired. 
Put a towel in the steamer, set it over boiling water, 
and put the dumplings in and steam them until 
done. Sei:ve with rich sauce. 



166 T^INNUSSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Boiled Apple Dumplings (No. 1). 

Made the same as baked dumplings, only they are 
put into a small square cloth which has been dipped 
in hot water and well floured. Tie them up well, 
leaving room for the dumpling to swell. Put them 
in a pot of boiling water and boil one hour. Serve 
with sauce. Peaches and other fruit are used in the 
same way. 

Boiled Apple Dumplings (No. 2). 

Take equal quantities of mashed Irish potatoes 
ond sifted flour, put the flour in a bowl, and add the 
potatoes and a little salt; work it together. Break 
off a piece large enough to cover the apples. Have 
boiling water to drop them in. Do not cover the ves- 
sel, or they will break to pieces. Serve with sauce. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. THOMPSON ANDERSON. 

Suet Dumplings. 

2 cups of fine bread crumbs soaked in a lit- 
tle milk, 

1 cup of finely cJiopped beef suet, 
4 eggs beaten separately, 

2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
2 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 teaspoonful of salt, 

Enough milk to mix into a stiff paste. 
Make into balls with floured hands, put into dump- 
ling cloths dipped in hot water and floured inside; 
leave room for the dumplings to swell and tie with 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND DUMPLINGS. 167 



strings tightly. Boil or steam them one hour. 
Serve hot with sauce. 

Fruit Suet Dumplings. 
Add J pound of raisins, seeded and chopped, and 
J pound of currants, washed and dried ; dredge them 
with flour and stir them into suet dumpling paste 
made as above. Boil or steam them a little longer 
than plain suet dumplings. 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 

WHEN receipts for sauces in cook books call for 
liquor and spices a little apple vinegar used 
instead of brandy will answer every purpose in com- 
mon sauces for plum puddings, etc., as the liquor is 
mostly used to draw the strength from the spices. 
Good apple vinegar will have the same effect on 
spices, and is used instead of liquor in this book. 
Sauce for Puddings. 
Cream J cup of butter with 1 cup of pulverized 
sugar, add 1 cup of boiling water, 1 teaspoonful of 
lemon or vanilla, then add whites of 2 eggs well 
whipped. Alice L. King. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. 

Plain Sauce. 
Stir into 1 pint of boiling w^ater 1 cup of sugar, 2 
lablespoonfuls of butter, yolk of 1 egg, a pinch of 
flour and salt well mixed; add a little vinegar if 
liked; stir until it thickens and foams. Flavor to 
taste, and serve. 

Sugar Sirup Sauce. 
Boil without stirring 1 cup of granulated sugar, J 
cup of water, 1 level tablespoonful of butter, until 
thick as sirup; add 1 tablespoonful of lemon juice 
or a little vinegar. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

Brown Sugar Sauce. 
Mix 1 cup of brown sugar, J cup of butter, 1 table- 
spoonful of flour, a little vinegar; stir it into 1 pint 
(168) 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. l69 

of boiling water until it has thickened; salt and 
flavor to taste. Serve hot. 

Molasses Sauce. 
Mix 1 cup of sugar, J cup of molasses, \ cup of but- 
ter, 1 heaped teaspoonful of flour, 1 tablespoonful 
of lemon juice or a little vinegar, a little nutmeg, 
cinnamon, cloves, and a pinch of salt; when these 
are all mixed add 1 cup or more of boiling water. 
Stir it constantly until it boils; strain and serve. 

Custard Sauce. 
Cream together 1 cup of sugar, J cup of butter; 
add yolks of 4 eggs well beaten; pour over this 1 cup 
of hot milk, stirring it all the time; stir it over the 
fire a few minutes; salt, flavor with vanilla or cinna- 
mon. Serve hot or cold. 

Cold Hard Sauce. 
Beat together until white and creamy 1 cup of fine 
sugar, J cup of butter ; flavor to taste. Shape to suit 
fancy. Can use orange, lemon, or any kind of fruits 
in this sauce if desired. 

Cold Cream Sauce. 
Sweeten 1 or 2 cups of cream or rich milk and 
flavor to taste. This sauce is quickly made and an- 
swers every purpose with some kinds of puddings. 

Whipped Cream Sauce. 
Mix \ cup of powdered sugar with 1 cup of ice-cold 
cream, flavor, and whip to a froth; stir in at the last 
beaten white of 1 egg. A delicious sauce for any 
pudding, hot or cold. 



170 TENNESSEE 310 DEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Hot Fruit Sauce. 
Mash 1 pint or more of ripe fruit, mix with it 1 
cup (more or less, to taste) of sugar, and let stand 
awhile. Just before it is needed set it over the fire, 
and stir it constantly until it is quite hot. 

Cold Fruit Sauce. 

Mash 2 cups of ripe fruit with J cup of sugar (or 
more sugar, if fruit is acid), J cup of creamed butter; 
beat until light and foamy, then stir in the beaten 
white of 1 egg. 

Berry Sauce. 

Mix together 2 cups of berries (any kind desired), 
I cup of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 cup of 
hot water, and cook slowly. Skim several times; 
strain it through a sieve. This is a good sauce for 
dumplings and rolls or fruit puddings.. 

Jelly Sauce. 

Melt J cup of jelly (any kind), 2 tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, in 1 cup of hot water; add 2 tablespoonfuls 
of butter, stir in 1 teaspoonful of cornstarch dis- 
solved in J cup of water, and let it come to a boil. 
Set it in hot water until time to serve ; stir it several 
times. 

Caramel Sauce. 

Place in a small pan 1 cup of sugar, stir it over 
the fire until it is brown; add 1 cup of boiling water, 
and let it simmer ten or fifteen minutes. Serve cold. 

Egg Sauce. 
Mix with f cup of powdered sugar white of 1 ^^^ 
beaten stiff, 2 tablespoonfuls of cream ; beat together 



SA UCES FOR PUDDINGS. 171 

until light. If desired, add 1 cup of finely mashed 
berries or other fruit. 

Spiced Sauce. 
Use 2 cups of sugar, J cup of butter, 2 teaspoon- 
fuls of cornstarch or flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of vine- 
gar, 2 cups of boiling water, 1 dessert-spoonful of 
mixed ground spices, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. 
Tie the spices in a muslin cloth. Stir it over the fire 
until thickened. 

Sauce. 
^ cup of butter, 
J cup of sugar. 
White of 1 egg. 
Cream butter and sugar, add the white of 1 egg well 
beaten, thin this with boiling water, added slowly. 
Flavor to taste. Sallie Cross Shelton. 

Mont Eagle, Teun. 

Sugar Sauce. 

Boil together 2 cups of white or brown sugar and 
1 cup of water until as thick as desired. Flavor to 
taste. This makes a very sweet sauce, but some pre- 
fer it to all other sauces. 



Pancakes, Fritters, and Shortcakes. 

USE a small frying pan for pancakes, heat it, put 
in about 2 teaspoonfuls of lard; be careful not 
to have too much grease; let it run quickly over 
the bottom, then pour in a large ladleful of the bat- 
ter, enough to cover the bottom of the pan with a 
thin sheet. When the first side is done turn it with 
a broad batter cake turner made for the purpose. 
Be careful not to tear the cake. When done have 
ready a hot dish, turn out the pancake upon it, and 
sprinkle it with powdered sugar; roll it up like a 
sheet of paper or leave it plain and set it in the oven 
to keep hot until you have enough fried. Serve hot. 
To fry fritters have plenty of nice sweet lard in a 
round-bottom saucepan or kettle, rather wide at the 
top, and test the heat by dropping in a small spoon- 
ful of the batter. If right, it will rise to the top in 
a ball and will speedily become a nice brown. Fry 
as many at a time as the vessel will hold; take up 
with a skimmer as soon as done, drain well, put on a 
hot dish, sift sugar over them, and serve immediate- 
ly. Serve fresh hot ones while the batter lasts. 

Pancakes (No. 1). 
1 pint of flour, 
6 eggs beaten separately, 
J teaspoonful of salt, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder, 

2 cups of milk or enough to make a thin 
batter. 

Sift the flour and baking powder together, beat the 
(172) 



PANCAKES, FRITTERS, AND SHORTCAKES. 173 

jolks light, add the salt and milk, then the flour and 
beaten whites alternately; thin with more milk if 
needed. Fry as directed in suggestions. 

Pancakes (No. 2). 
1 pint of flour, 

3 eggs beaten separately, 
^ teaspoonful of soda, 

^ teaspoonful of salt, 
Buttermilk to make a thin batter. 
Jelly or Peeserve Pancakes. 
When the pancakes are fried lay them on a hot 
plate, spread quickly with nice jelly, preserves, or 
jam, roll them up neatly, and sprinkle with pow- 
dered sugar. Serve with sauce or cream. 
Fritters (No. 1). 
Six eggs beaten separately, 1 quart of milk, 3 cups 
of flour sifted with 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 teaspoonful of salt. Beat the yolks light, stir in 
the milk, salt, and flour, lastly the stiff-beaten 
whites; beat hard and fry at once in large ladlefuls. 

Fritters (No. 2). 
1 pint of flour, 

4 eggs beaten separately, 
1 teaspoonful of salt, 

1 pint of boiling water. 
Stir the flour into the water by degrees, and stir 
until it has boiled three or four minutes; let it get 
almost cold, then beat in the beaten yolks, then the 
stiff-beaten whites of the eggs. Fry as directed in 
suggestions. Can use sweet milk to scald the flour 
with instead of water, if preferred. Serve hot with 
jelly, preserves, fruit sauce, or maple sirup. 



174 TENNESSEE MODEL HO USEHOLD G UIDE. 

Fruit Fritters. 

Add 1 or 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar to plain frit- 
ter batter and beat into it some finely chopped fruit 
of any kind desired. Apples, peaches, oranges, or 
stewed dried fruits of any kind can be used. 



Shortcake. 

One quart of flour with 1 teaspoonful of soda sift- 
ed in it; f cup of butter, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 
1 teaspoonful of salt well rubbed into the flour, 1 
well-beaten egg mixed with 1 cup of buttermilk; mix 
into soft dough and handle very lightly. Roll it out, 
cut it into two round layers, spread a little butter 
between them, lay one smoothly upon the other in 
deep jelly tins so that they will be the same size; 
bake in a moderate oven. When done, and while 
warm (not hot), separate them and spread with fruit 
which has been well sweetened or sprinkle it heavily 
with sugar as you spread it between layers; sprinkle 
sugar over the top, and serve with sweetened cream. 
Soft peaches make a delightful filling. 



Peach Shortcake. 

Make a rich pastry, roll it thin, and bake three 
crusts in pie pans. Let them get thoroughly cold. 
Peel peaches, cut and mash them well, sweeten them, 
and spread them between the crusts. Set them in 
a cold place. Serve with whipped cream. This is 
delicious and inexpensive. 

Nashville, Tenn. MaGGIE M. WeBBER. 



PANCAKES, FRITTERS, AND SHORTCAKES. 1T5 

Cream for Shortcake. 
1 cup of sweet milk, 
1 small pinch of salt, 
1 piece of butter size of a hickory nut, 

1 teaspoonf ul of cornstarch, 

2 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 

Put the milk on to boil, add the sugar, salt, and but- 
ter, dissolve the starch in cold milk, add it to the hot 
milk, and let it boil up ; add beaten whites of 2 eggs, 
stir it rapidly while boiling three minutes. Let it 
get cold before using. 



CAKES. 



YOU should give yourself plenty of time in making 
cake. Now and then a quickly made cake is a 
success, but more often a failure. Use none but the 
best material. Have all ingredients measured and 
properly prepared before beginning to mix any of 
them. Have dry flour, fine dry sugar, fresh milk (or 
water), be sure to beat eggs sufficiently, and stir but- 
ter and sugar to a cream, beating well. Never stir 
cake after butter and sugar are creamed, but heat it. 
Some prefer to add the sugar to the stiff - beaten 
whites instead of to the creamed butter. Either way 
will do, provided you heat it well together. Cake 
is often ruined by looking at it too often when 
first put into oven. When done let remain in pan 
until cold, then set it in the oven just long enough 
to warm the tin through, if it will not turn out eas- 
ily without warming. All cakes should be kept in 
air-tight cans in a cool place. All receipts in this 
book calling for milk mean sweet milk unless sour or 
buttermilk is specified. 

Table for Cooking Cakes. 

Fruit cake, 2 to 4 hours. 
Plain cake, 30 to 40 minutes. 
Sponge cake, 45 to 60 minutes. 
Gingerbread, 20 to 30 minutes. 
Cookies, 10 to 15 minutes. 
(176) 



CAKES. 177 



To Seed Raisins. 
Pour boiling water over them, cover, and let stand 
five or ten minutes; drain off, rub each raisin be- 
tween the thumb and finger, and the seeds will come 
out easily. 

To Clean Currants. 

Put them in a sieve, sprinkle them heavily with 
flour, rub them until they separate and the fine 
stems, grit, and flour have passed through the sieve. 
Place the sieve and currants both in a pan of water, 
wash the currants thoroughly, lift sieve and cur- 
rants together, and change the water until clear. 
Dry the currants between towels and spread them 
until ready for use. 

Baking Powder. 

It is a good idea to prepare your own baking pow- 
der by sifting together five or six times J pound of 
cream of tartar, \ pound of soda, J pound of corn- 
starch, lest brands. Put it into an air-tight box. 
Use measure a?s called for in receipts. It is best to 
buy material at a drug store, to be sure of pure ar- 
ticles. 

To Dry Flour. 

Place flour in a pan, set it in the hot sun, before a 
fire, or in a cool oven awhile before using. 

To Beat Eggs. 
Have eggs and the dish that they are to be beaten 
in cold. Whites froth more easily by adding a small 
pinch of salt; whip until a very stiff froth. Add a 
pinch of salt to yolks and beat them until a spoonful 
can be lifted clear of strings. 
12 ' 



178 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

White Cake (No. 1). 

1 heaping cup of creamed butter, 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
4 cups of dried flour, 

^ cup of sweet milk, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

Whites of 12 eggs. 
Cream the butter, add the sifted sugar, and heat well 
until very light; sift the flour several times, then sift 
the baking powder with it. Beat the whites of eggs 
veri/ stiff. Do not stir the batter after the butter 
and sugar are creamed, but heat in a little at a time 
the other ingredients until the batter is very smooth. 
Flavor to taste. A nice plain cake. 

White Cake (No. 2). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 cup of sweet milk. 

Whites of 8 eggs well beaten. 

Na8hvaie,Tenn. MattIE DuNCAN. 

White Cake (No.'^S). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 
5 cups of flour, 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk or water, 
Whites of 9 eggs. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. C. H. A. GeRDING. 



CAKES. 179 



White Cake (No. 4). 
1 cup of butter, 
3 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk or cold water, 
5 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 10 eggs beaten stiff, 
Flavor to taste. 

Nashville, Teun. MrS. FlOUJUE DoDD. 

White Cake (No. 5). 

Work 1 cup of butter to a cream, add to it gradu- 
ally 2 cups of sugar; when light and creamy add 1 
cup of milk and 2 cups of flour that has been sifted 
three times. Beat vigorously and add gradually the 
stiff-beaten whites of 11 eggs and 1 more cup of 
flour alternately; mix gently, but thoroughly. Mix 
in quickly 1 teaspoonful of baking powder; flavor, 
and bake in a moderate oven. Mrs. J. T. Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

White Cake (No. 6). 

Take 2 cups of butter and 4 cups of sugar, beat 
them well together. Beat whites of 20 eggs to a 
froth, measure and sift well 6 cups of flour, add 1 
cup of the flour, then a little of the eggs, beat well, 
then add another cup of flour, a little more of the 
eggs, and so on until all are worked in. Then add 
lastly 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar and 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda powdered together. This is an ex- 
cellent cake when made rightly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. C. H. A. GeRDING. 



1^0 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

White Cake (No. 1). 
J cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

3 cups of flour, 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 4 eggs. 

Nashville, Tenn. MiSS SaLLIE McClELLAND. 

White Cake (No. 8). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

^ cup of sweet milk, 

3^ cups of flour, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder, 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla, 
Whites of 8 eggs well beaten. 

Cream butter and sugar together, add milk spoon- 
ful at a time, then flour, and the well-beaten whites 
last. Sallie Cross Shelton. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. 

White Layer Cake. 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
I cup of creamed butter, 

J cup of sweet milk, 

2J cups of dried flour, 

2| teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

Whites of 8 eggs. 
Cream the butter and sugar together very light; if 
too stiff, add the milk; sift the flour several times, 
then sift the baking powder with it, beat the eggs 
very stiff, add the flour and eggs alternately a little 
at a time, and beat until very smooth. Flavor to 



CAKES. 181 



taste. Hickory nut kernels or blanched almonds in 
icing make a good filling for this cake; a few kernels 
put in the batter gives a nice flavor. This is a small 
cake, but extra nice when made carefully. 

Beautiful White Cake. 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

J cup of sweet milk, 

3 cups of flour sifted with 

•J teaspoonful of baking powder, 
1 teaspoonful of lemon extract, 
Whites of 8 eggs. 
First sift sugar and flour four or five times and 
measure your cups after. Cream butter thoroughly 
until it looks puffy. Beat whites stiff and add su- 
gar gradually, then beat butter into the eggs and su- 
gar, then 1 cup of flour, half of the milk, second cu]) 
of flour, balance of milk, third cup of flour. Then 
add the extract. Bake ns plain w^hite cake or layer 
cake. Miss Sallie McClelland. 

Nashville, Teun. 

Good Cake (No. 1). 

1 cup of creamed butter, 

3 cups of sugar, 

4J cups of sifted flour (in summer 5 cups), 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted in 
the flour, 

1 cup of cream or sweet milk. 

Whites of 12 eggs well beaten. 
Mix the whites in last. Use any filling you like, but 
grated pineapple mixed with cooked icing is nice. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. JoHNELLA CoRBETT. 



182 tenni:ssi:e model ho vsehold g vide. 

Good Cake (No. 2). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of milk, 

4 cups of flour after sifting, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

8 eggs, saving out 5 whites for icing. 
Sift flour and baking powder together five times, 
beat eggs separately, cream butter and sugar to- 
gether very light, add beaten yolks to butter and 
sugar, then milk and flour, lastly the beaten whites. 
Flavor to taste. 

Heart's-ease Cake. 
Whites of 10 eggs, 
1 cup of butter, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 
2|- cups of sugar, 

2 heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
4 cups of flour. 

Cream the butter and sugar until white and smooth ; 
add the milk, sift the flour several times, then sift 
the baking powder with it, and add in small quanti- 
ties, beating all the while. Then add the eggs 
beaten stiff, and beat the batter until perfectly 
smooth. If too thin, add more flour. For a plain 
cake have a stiff batter, but for layer have it thin, 
and bake quickly. The measuring cup should be 
large. Clara C. Epperson. 

Algood, Tenn. 



CAKES. 183 



Neapolitan Cake. 

1 pound of flour sifted several times, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
I pound of butter creamed with 

1 pound of pulverized sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

Whites of 9 eggs well beaten, 

Flavor to suit the taste. 
Bake in layers. Make icing of whites of 3 eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth, 2^ cups of granulated sugar; 
moisten the sugar with cold water, let boil without 
stirring until a thick, clear sirup, pour into whites, 
beat well, and flavor. 1 pound of almonds blanched, 
1 pound of English walnuts, 1 pound of raisins seed- 
ed; chop half of almonds and walnuts, put icing be- 
tween layers, cover with raisins and chopped nuts, 
cover cake with icing, ornament with raisins, al- 
monds, walnuts, and crystallized cherries. 

Nashville, Tenn. SUSIE E. GlENN. 

Marshmallow Cake. 

1 pound of sugar, 

2 pound of butter, 

1 pound of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Whites of 16 eggs. 

Cream the butter and sugar together until light, 
beat the eggs very stiff, add some flour and some of 
the beaten egg until all are well mixed and the bat- 
ter is smooth. Flavor to taste. Bake in layer tins 
and use marsh mallow filling. 

Franklin, Tenn. MrS. GeORGE W. SmITHSON. 



184 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Ice Cream Cake. 

IJ cups of butter, 
3J cups of sugar, 
^ cup of milk. 
Whites of 12 eggs, 
6 cups of flour, 

4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Bake in layers and use filling for ice cream cake. 

Nashville, Tenu. MrS. ByRD MuRRAY. 

Cornstarch Cake. 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 

2 J cups of flour sifted several times with 
^ cup of cornstarch and 
2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk. 
Whites of 8 eggs well beaten. 
Mix it smoothly, flavor to taste, and bake as one 
large cake or as layer cake, using any filling desired. 

Cornstarch Snow Cake. 

1 cup of butter creamed with 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

2 cups of flour sifted with 
1 cup of cornstarch and 

IJ teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 8 eggs beaten stiff, 
Flavor with rose, vanilla, or lemon ex- 
tract. 
Bake as a loaf or layer cake. 

Clifton, Tenn. MrS. H. S. CrAIN. 



CAKES. 185 



Pearl Cake. 
2 tablespoonfuls of butter, 
1 cup of sugar, 
^ cup of sweet milk, 

1 cup of flour, 

^ cup of cornstarch, 

^ teaspoonful of soda, 

^ teaspoonful of cream of tartar. 

Whites of 3 eggs well beaten. 

Flavor with vanilla. 

Henderson, Tenn. MrS. RoBERT PuRDY. 

Bride's Cake, 
1 cup of butter creamed with 
3 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
1 cup of cornstarch sifted with 
3 cups of flour and 
3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk; 
Whites of 12 eggs well beaten. 
Flavor to taste. 

Mix it smoothly, put it in a pan lined with paper 

and well buttered, and bake slowly. 

Cheap Cake. 

2 cups of sugar, 
J cup of butter, 

1 cup of cold water, 

3 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 5 eggs beaten stiff. 
Flavor to taste. 

This doubled makes a large cake. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. FlORRIE DoDD. 



186 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Buttermilk Cake. 
Whites of 16 eggs, 
4 cups of pulverized sugar sifted, 

1 cup of butter heaped, 

4| cups of flour, with which sift 

2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. 
Cream the butter and sugar together, add one-half 
of the flour and eggs beaten stiff. Mix well, add the 
rest of the flour and eggs; last of all add 1 cup of 
buttermilk with 1 level teaspoonful of soda beaten 
in it until it foams. Can be baked as plain or layer 
cake. Mrs. Arthur McDaniel. 

Algood, Tenn. 

Silver Layer Cake. 

3 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
f cup of creamed butter, 

f cup of sweet milk, 

3| cups of flour sifted several times with 
3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 12 eggs well beaten. 
Bake in layers. Use any kind of filling desired. 

Gold Layer Cake. 
Made same as silver layer cake, only use yolks of 
eggs instead of whites. Both of these make nice, 
light layer cakes if mixed carefully and smoothly. 
CocoANUT Layer Cake. 

2 cups of sugar, 
J cup of butter, 

1 cup of milk, 

3 cups of flour, 
3 eggs, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Bake in round tins. 

Filling for same: 1 cup of concentrated shred co- 



CAKES. 187 



ooanut, add whites of three eggs beaten to a froth 
and 1 cup of sugar; spread this between layers of 
cake. Then to J cup of cocoanut add 4 tablespoon- 
fuls of powdered sugar and spread thickly over top 
of cake. Viola McDonald. 

Nettle Carrier, Tenn. 

Cup Cake (No. 1). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 cups of flour, 

4 eggs well beaten, 
J cup of buttermilk, 

1 teaspoonful of soda. 

Nashville, Tenn MrS. C. H. A. GeRDING. 

Cup Cake (No. 2). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 cups of flour, 

4 eggs well beaten, 
I cup of sweet milk, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. SaLLIE CrOSS ShELTON. 

Good Cup Cake. 

1 cup of butter creamed with 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
4 cups of flour sifted well with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 
6 eggs beaten separately. 
Flavor to suit taste. 



188 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Rich Cup Cake. 

1 cup of butter creamed with 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 

3 cups of flour sifted well with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 

4 eggs well beaten. 
Flavor to taste. 

Nye Cake, 

IJ cups of butter, 

3 cups of sugar, 

5 cups of flour sifted with 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 

7 eggs well beaten, 
Flavor with lemon. 

Henderson, Tenn. MrS. RoBERT PuRDY. 

Dinner Cake. 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

4 eggs well beaten, 
3J cups of flour, 

IJ teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1} cups of sweet milk, 

IJ teaspoonfuls of lemon extract. 

Livingston, Tenn. MiSS FLORENCE WlNPLE. 

Old-fashioned Poundcake (No. 1). 

1 pound of sugar, 

J pound of butter, 

12 eggs beaten separately, 



CAKES. 189 



1 teaspoonful of soda, 

1 cup of buttermilk. 
Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth ; beat the 
yolks thoroughly, add the butter, sugar, and whites 
of eggs to the yolks, with flour enough to make a 
good batter; then add the buttermilk, and soda last. 
Use any flavor desired or none. 

Cookeville, Tenn. MrS. HENRIETTA FORD. 



Old-fashioned Poundcake (No. 2). 

1 pound of sugar, 
f pound of butter, 

I pound of flour, 

II eggs beaten separately. 

Cream the butter and sugar until very light, beat 
the yolks light and add to the butter and sugar; 
beat them well together. Sift the flour several 
times and beat the whites of the eggs very stiff and 
add them alternately to the mixture; when thor- 
oughly mixed heat it steadily for half an hour. Fla- 
vor to taste, and bake. 

Gold Cake (No. 1). 

1 cup of butter creamed with 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
5 cups of flour sifted well with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 cup of sweet milk. 
Yolks of 8 eggs well beaten, 
Flavor with lemon. 



190 TENNJESSUE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Gold Cake (No. 2). 
2 cups of sifted powdered sugar 
J cup of creamed butter, 
J cup of sweet milk, 

2J cups of flour sifted several times with 
2 teaspoonf uls of baking powder, 
Yolks of 8 eggs well beaten. 

Black Cake. 
2 cups of sugar, 
1 cup of butter, 
1 cup of molasses, 

1 cup of coffee, 
6 cups of flour, 

4 eggs well beaten, 

2 teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 
2 teaspoonfuls of cloves, 

1 pound of seeded raisins, 

1 pound of currants, 

1 tablespoonful of soda dissolved in the 

molasses. 
To be eaten while fresh. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. C. H. A. GeRDING. 

Chocolate Cake (No. 1). 

Boil together until it thickens 
J cup of rich milk, 
1 egg, yolk onlv, 

i cake of chocolate; when cold add 
1 cup of sugar, or sweet as taste demands, 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 
J cup of milk, 

2 cups of flour, 



CAKES. 191 



2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

Flavor with vanilla. 
Bake in three layers; when cold put together with 
boiled icing. Mrs. A. W. Brockway. 

Brownsville, Tenu. 

Chocolate Cake (No. 2). 
f cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 cups of flour, 

3 even teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 scant cup of sweet milk, 

4 eggs, 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 

Bake in jelly cake tins and spread with chocolate 
filling. Mrs. Hattie E. Story. 

Sparta, Tenn. 

Ribbon Cake. 
First part — | cup of butter, 
1 J cups of sugar, 
J cup of sweet milk, 

2 cups of flour, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder, 

Whites of 4 eggs. 
Divide in halves and color one-half with fruit color- 
ing ; leave the other white. 
Second part-J cup of butter, 

1 cup of sugar, 

I cup of sweet milk, 

IJ cups of flour, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder, 

Yolks of 4 eggs. 
Divide, and color one-half with baker's chocolate; 
leave the other yellow. Bake in layers. Use any 
filling you desire. 



192 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Watermelon Cake. 

White — 1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 
, 1 cup of sweet milk. 

3J cups of flour sifted several times with 
2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 8 eggs well beaten. 
Red — J cup of butter, 

1 cup of sifted red sugar, 
J cup of sweet milk, 

2 cups of flour sifted with 

1 heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, 
Whites of 4 eggs well beaten, 
1 cup of seeded raisins. 
If you cannot get red sugar, color the batter with 
fruit coloring. Be careful in putting it into the pan 
to keep the red batter around the tube of the pan 
and the white batter all around the outside of red, so 
as to resemble watermelon when cut. 

Marble Cake. 

Light part — Whites of 4 eggs, 

1 cup of butter, 

1 cup of sugar, 

J cup of sweet milk, 

3 cups of flour, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder. 
Dark part — Yolks of 4 eggs, 

J cup of molasses, 

1 cup of brown sugar, 

J cup of butter, 

J cup of sweet milk, 



CAKES. 193 

5 cups of flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Have the pan well greased and put in 1 spoonful of 
white and 1 spoonful of dark. The next layer alter- 
nate. Mrs. Ellen Harrill. 

Langston, Tenn. 

Orange Cake. 

2 cups of sugar, 

j cup of butter (scant), 
Yolks of 4 eggs. 
Whites of 4 eggs, 

3 cups of flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 large orange, juice and grated rind. 
Then put juice and grated rind of 1 orange into plain 
white icing for it. Mrs. Florrie Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Lemon Cake (No. 1). 

2 cups of sugar, 
J cup of butter. 

Yolks of 6 eggs, 1 whole egg, 

4 cups of flour sifted several times, 
I teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 
J cup of sweet milk, 

Juice of 1 lemon. 
Cream the butter and sugar, add the beaten yolks 
and the flour, beating hard for several minutes, add 
the milk and soda, lastly the lemon juice; beat it 
well and bake. 
13 • 



194 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Lemon Cake (No. 2). 

1 cup of butter, 

3 cups of sugar, 

5 eggs beaten separately, 

4 cups of flour, 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Juice and rind of 1 lemon added last. 

Henderson, Tenn. MrS. RoBERT PuRDY. 

Fruit Cake (No. 1). 

1 pound of butter, 
1 pound of sugar, 

1 pound of flour, 

2 tablespoonfuls of baking powder, 
12 eggs. 

Nutmeg, cinnamon, and allspice to taste, 

2 pounds of seeded raisins, 

2 pounds of washed dried currants, 

1 pound of citron cut fine, 

1 cup of cherry preserves, 

24 cents' worth of candied orange peel, 

2| cents' worth of candied lemon peel, 

i pound of shelled almonds. 
Reserve a little of the flour to dredge the fruit with 
before adding it to the batter. 

Fruit Cake (No. 2). 

1 pound of butter, 
1 pound of sugar, 
1 pound of flour, 
12 eggs well beaten. 



CAKES. 195 



1 tablespoonf ul of cinnamon, 

1 teaspoonful of cloves, 

2 teaspoonfuls of nutmeg, 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
2 pounds of seeded raisins, 

2 pounds of citron cut fine, 

2 pounds of currants, 

J pound of almonds blanched and cut fine, 

4 cup of cherry preserves or jelly. 

Have the fruit ready before making the batter, 
dredge it with flour, then mix well, and bake slowly 
four hours. You can use half the amount of fruit, 
and leave out the spices for plain fruit cake. 



Fruit Cake (No. 3). 

J pound of butter, 
1 pound of sugar, 

1 pound of flour, 

i pound of browned flour, 
10 eggs well beaten, 
^ cup of molasses, 

2 tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, 

1 tablespoonful of cloves, 

2 nutmegs grated, 

1 teaspoonful of cream of tartar and 
^ teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 

\ cup of sweet milk, 

2 pounds of seeded raisins, 
1 pound of citron cut fine, 
\ pound of currants. 

Clifton, Tenn. MrS. K. L. CoOKE. 



196 TENNESSEE MODEL HO USEHOLD G VIDE. 

White Fruit Cake. 
Add to ichite cake batter 1 pound each of seeded 
raisins, figs, blanclied almonds, citron chopped fine, 
and 1 cup of grated cocoanut. Sift a little flour over 
the fruit before stirring it in. Bake as loaf or layer 
cake with icing filling. Leave out the raisins and 
figs if you wish it entirely white. 

Apple Fruit Cake. 
To 1 cup of stewed dried apples well mashed, add 
2 cups of sugar, f cup of creamed butter, 3 well 
beaten eggs, J cup of sweet milk, 3 cups of flour 
sifted with 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, J cup 
each of seeded raisins, currants, and minced citron, 
1 tablespoonful of mixed ground spices. 

Spice Cake (No. 1). 

IJ cups of butter, 

8 cups of sugar, 

IJ cups of buttermilk, 

6 cups of flour, 

6 eggs well beaten, 

IJ teaspoonfuls* of soda, 

J teaspoonful of cloves, 

IJ teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 

14 teaspoonfuls of nutmeg, 

I teaspoonful of spice. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. AlEX M. RaLSTON. 

Spice Cake (No. 2). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of brown sugar, 



CAKES. 197 



1 cup of molasses, 

1 cup of buttermilk, 

1 teaspoonful of soda, 

5 cups of flour, 

Yolks of 7 eggs, 

1 whole egg. 
Cream the butter and sugar, add well-beaten egg^, 
beat it to a light batter, add the molasses, milk, 
soda, and flour, and beat in 1 teaspoonful of ground 
cloves, 2 teaspoonfuls each of ginger and cinnamon, 
1 grated nutmeg, a small pinch of Cayenne pepper. 
Bake in a moderate oven. 

Spanish Bunn Cake. 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

G eggs beaten separately, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

4 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
1 tablespoonful of cloves, 

1 tablespoonful of allspice, 
1 tablespoonful of nutmeg. 

Livingston, Tenn. MrS. MaRTHA GOODPASTURE. 

Nut Cake (No. 1). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

J cup of sweet milk, 

3 cups of flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
Whites of 6 eggs well beaten, 
1 cup of hickory nut kernels. 

Chestnut Bhiff, Tenn. MrS. J. B. PaRKER. 



198 ti:nnessee model household guide. 

Nut Cake (No. 2). 

1 cup of sugar, 
^ cup of butter, 
J cup of milk, 

2 cups of pastry tiour, 
2 eggs, 

1 cup of chopped raisins, 
1 cup of chopped English walnuts, 
1 teaspoonf ul of cream of tartar, 
J teaspoonful of soda. 
Beat the butter to a cream, add the sugar gradually; 
when light add the eggs well beaten, then the milk, 
and flour in which the soda and cream of tartar have 
been sifted; mix quickly, add the raisins and nuts. 
Bake in deep sheets. If baking powder is preferred 
instead of cream of tartar and soda, use IJ teaspoon- 
fuls. Miss Viola McDonald. 

Nettle Carrier, Tenn. 



Nut Cake (No. 3). 

2 cups of sugar, 

J cup of creamed butter, 
4 eggs beaten very light, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

3 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 cup of hickory nut kernels floured a 
little. 
Beat well together, flavor with vanilla, bake as loaf 
or layer cake or in muflfin rings as desired. 

Nashville, Tenn, IrMA HuGGTNS. 



CAKES. 199 



Jam Cake (No. 1). 
I cup of butter, 

1 cup of sugar, 

^ cup of sweet milk, 
3 cups of flour, 

3 eggs well beaten, 

2 teaspoonf uls of baking powder, 
1 cup of blackberry jam, 

1 cup of citron cut fine, 

1 tablespoonful of mixed spices. 

Jam Cake (No. 2). 

2 cups of sugar, 
J cup of butter, 
•J cup of milk, 

4 cups of flour, 
2 cups of jam, 
6 egg%, 

1 teaspoonful of soda, 
1 tablespoonful of cinnamon, allspice, 
and nutmeg. 

Nettle Carrier, Teiin. MiSS ViOLA McDoNALD. 

Angel Food (No. 1). 

11 whites of eggs well beaten, 

1 goblet of flour sifted five times, 

J goblet of sugar, 

1 level teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted 
into the flour, then the flour and sugar stirred into 
the eggs gradually. Flavor with vanilla. Put into 
a hrigJit pan that is not greaf^ed and bake three-quar- 
ters of an hour. Miss Lilly House. 

Franklin, Tenn. 



200 TJSNNES8EE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Angel Food (No, 2). 
Whites of 11 eggs beaten stiff, 
'■ IJ tumblers of sugar sifted five times, 

1 tumbler of flour sifted five times with 

2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. 
Gradually mix the sugar and flour with the whites, 
flavor, and bake. When done turn the tin up and 
let stand one hour. Mrs. Alex M. Ralston. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Improved Angel Cake. 
Whites of 9 large, fresh eggs or 10 smaller ones, 
li cups of sifted granulated sugar, 1 cup of sifted 
flour, J teaspoonful of cream of tartar, a pinch of 
salt, added to eggs before beating. After sifting 
flour four or five times measure and set aside 1 cup; 
then sift and measure 1^ cups of granulated sugar, 
beat whites of eggs about half, add cream of tartar, 
and beat until very stiff; stir in the sugar, then the 
flour very lightly. Put in a pan in a moderate oven 
at once. Will bake in thirty-five or forty minutes. 

Mrs. Van Deusen. 

Improved Sunshine Cake. 
Whites of 7 small, fresh eggs, yolks of 5, 1 cup of 
granulated sugar, | cup of flour, J teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar, and a pinch of salt. Sift, measure, 
and set aside flour and sugar as for angel cake. 
Beat yolks of eggs thoroughly, wash the beater, and 
beat the whites about half; add cream of tartar and 
beat until very, verij stiff. Stir in sugar lightly, 
then beaten yolks thoroughly, then add the flour. 
Put into tube pan and into the oven at once. Will 
bake in thirty-five or forty minutes. 

Mrs. Van Deusen. 



CAKES. 201 



Improved Sponge Cake. 

5 large, fresh eggs, 

IJ cups of granulated sugar, 

1 cup of flour, 

J teaspoonful of cream of tartar. 
Handle precisely as improved sunshine cake. Bake 
in a moderate oven. Mrs. Van Deusen. 

White Sponge Cake. 

Whites of 10 eggs, 
IJ cups of sugar, 
1 cup of flour, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder. 
Whip the whites very stiff, sift the sugar into the 
whites gently, sift the flour and baking powder to- 
gether, and sift in the same as you did sugar. Do 
not stir as much as you do other cake. Flavor, 
cover it with thick paper, and bake it in a quick 
oven. Mrs. Byrd Murray. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Velvet Sponge Cake (No. 1). 

2 cups of sugar, 

6 eggs, leaving out 3 whites, 
1 cup of boiling water, 

2^ cups of flour, 

1 tablespoonful of baking powder. 
Add the sugar to the yolks, beat fifteen minutes, aad 
the beaten whites and the cup of boiling water just 
before the flour. Icing made of the whites of 3 eggs 
and 6 dessert-spoonfuls of sugar to each egg. 

Franklin, Teun. MrS. GeORGE W. SmITHSON. 



202 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Velvet Sponge Cake (No. 2). 
2J CU13S of flour, 
2 cups of sugar, 

1 cuj) of boiling water, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Yellows of 6 eggs, 

Whites of 3 eggs. 
Break the jolks into the sugar, beat fifteen minutes 
by the clock, pour in gradually the boiling water, 
beating it all the time. When it cools a little stir 
in the well-beaten whites, and gradually add the 
flour sifted with the powder. 

Dixon Springs, Tenn. NaNNIE ALEXANDER DENNY. 

Sponge Cake (No. 1). 
2 cups of sugar, 
2 cups of flour, 

4 eggs, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 teaspoonful of lemon extract, 
f cup of boiling water. 

Add the water last. The cake may seem too thin, 
but will come all right from the oven. 

: Waverly,Tenn. MrS. J. N. SiMPSON. 

Sponge Cake (No. 2). 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of boiling water, 

3 cups of sifted flour, 

1 tablespoonful of baking powder, 

5 eggs. 

Mix very lightly and bake. 

Nashville, Tenn. MiSS SaLLIE McClELLAND. 



CAKi:s. 203 



Two-egg Sponge Cake. 
Two eggs beaten separately; add 1 tablespoonful 
of cold water to yolks before adding 1 scant cupful 
of sugar; beat well, then add 3 tablespoonfuls of 
cold water. Mix thoroughly 1 rounding teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder into IJ cups of sifted flour. 
After stirring in half the flour put in the beaten 
whites, add the remaining flour and flavoring, and 
bake in a moderately quick oven. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. FaNNIE L. InNIS. 

Sponge Blocks. 

5 eggs beaten separately, 

2 cups of sugar, 

2 cups of flour, 

1 cup of boiling water, 

1 tablespoonful of baking powder. 
Put the baking powder in the last cup of flour; pour 
the boiling water over the yolks and sugar beaten 
light; put the well-beaten whites in just before the 
last cup of flour. Bake in a large pan, cut into 
small blocks with a heated knife, place each block 
on a saucer, and ice it. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. BetTIE RaNSOM FiNCH. 

Soft Ginger Bread. 
1 cup of lard and a little salt well beaten, 
1 cup of sugar, 
1 cup of molasses with 

1 teaspoonful of soda beaten in, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

1 tablespoonful of ground ginger, 
1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
5 cups of flour (scant). 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. AlICE L. KiNG. 



204 TENNESSEE MODEL HOVSEIlOLD GUIDE. 

Soft Ginger Cake. 

1 cup of butter, 

1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of molasses, 

1 cup of buttermilk, 

IJ teaspoonfuls of soda dissolved in hot 

water, 
1 tablespoonful of ground ginger, 

1 tablespoonful of ground cinnamon, 

2 eggs beaten light, 
5 cups of flour sifted. 

Stir butter, sugar, molasses, and spice well together, 
set them on the stove and let get slightly w^arm; 
add the milk to the warm mixture, then the eggs, 
the soda, and lastly the flour. Beat it very hard 
five or ten minutes. Bake in a large, well-greased 
cake pan with a spout in the center or in small tins. 

Ginger Bread. 

Of all the birds that fly the air- 
Black, or blue, or red — 

Of all the cakes my mammy bakes 
Give me this ginger bread. 

2 cups of molasses, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

1 level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 

1 cup of buttermilk, 

1 cup of melted lard, 

4 cups of flour, 

1 tablespoonful of ground ginger. 

Nashville, Tenn. Mr. WiLLIAM M. DoUGLASS. 



CAKES. 205 



Black Mammy's Ginger Cakes. 
1 large cup of molasses, 
1 large cup of sugar, 

1 large cup of buttermilk, 

2 large spoons of lard, 

1 scant dessert-spoonful of soda, 

1 tablespoonful of ginger. 
Make almost as stiff with flour as biscuit dough, roll 
tolerably thin, cut out, and bake quickly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. H. C. ShAPARD. 

Ginger Snaps (No. 1). 
1 cup of brown sugar, 
1 cup of molasses, 

4 cup of lard and butter melted together, 
1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
4 teaspoonful of cloves, 
3 tablespoonfuls of ginger, 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in J cup of 
boiling water. 
Thicken with flour, roll thin, and bake. 

Langston, Tenn. MrS. ElLEN HaRRILL. 

Ginger Snaps (No.. 2). 
1 large cup of butter and lard mixed, 
1 cup of sugar, 
1 cup of molasses, 
^ cup of water, 

1 tablespoonful of ground ginger, 
1 tablespoonful of ground cinnamon, 
1 teaspoonful of ground cloves, 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot 

water. 
Flour enough for a tolerably stiff dough. 

Roll out mych thinner than tea cakes, and bake 

quickly. 



206 TENJVUSSUE 3I0DEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Tea Cakes (No. 1). 

1 cup of lard, 

3 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sour milk, 

3 eggs. 

1 teaspoonful of soda. 
Flavor with nutmeg or lemon, enough flour to make 
a tolerable stiff dough. Eoll thin, bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. H. E. Bevoley. 

Russellville, Tenn. 

Tea Cakes (No. 2). 

The yolks of 3 eggs beaten with IJ cups of sugar; 
flavor and pour into this | cup of sweet milk and add 
beaten whites. Sift 3 pints of flour with 1 table- 
spoonful of baking powder, chop f cup of butter into 
the flour, into which pour the custard and make a 
soft dough. Work it as little as possible, roll thin, 
and bake quickly. Mrs Alex M. Ralston. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Tea Cakes (No. 3). 

1 cup of sugar, 
I cup of lard, 

1 quart of sifted flour, 
3 eggs well beaten, 

2 tablespoonfuls of cream or sweet milk, 
1 tablespoonful of baking powder. 

Beat the sugar and eggs together, mix flour, baking 
powder, pinch of salt, and the lard; then put in the 
eggs and milk. Roll thin, sprinkle with sugar, and 
bake quickly. Mrs. A. P. McFerrin. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



CAKES. 207 



Tea Cakes (No. 4). 

1 cup of butter, 
1 cup of sugar, 

1 quart of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, 

2 tablespoonfuls of sweet milk with 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in it, 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla, 

2 eggs beaten separately. 

Cream butter, add sugar, then beaten yolks, milk, 
flour, and lastly beaten whites. Eoll out as soft as 
possible and bake in quick oven. 

Nashvaie, Tenn. MrS. ShADE MuRRAY. 

Tea Cakes (No. 5). 

1 cup of butter, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 eggs well beaten, 
J cup of sweet milk, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
J teasi)oonful of lemon extract, 
J teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. 
Flour enough to make a stiff dough. 
Roll it out and cut in shapes and bake. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. SaLLIE CrOSS ShELTON. 

Ammonia Tea Cakes. 

Beat 4 eggs (separately or not), stir in 1 pound of 
sugar, add ^ pound of melted butter or lard, flavor 
to taste, then add lastly 2 teaspoonfuls of carbonate 
of ammonia dissolved in | cup of milk-warm water; 
sift 3 pints of flour and pour the mixture into it. If 
you should wish sugar on top of some of the cakes, 
divide the dough, roll out, and sift sugar on top: cut 
out, press lightly on top, and bake quickly in a hot 
oven. Mrs. J. H. Fullton. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



208 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Doughnuts (No. 1). 

2 cups of sugar, 
4 cup of butter, 
4 eggs well beaten, 
1 cup of buttermilk, 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot 
water, 

1 teaspoonful of cinnamon. 

Flour enough for soft dough; roll thin, cut out with 
a round cutter. With a thimble cut a hole in the 
center of each. Fry them in boiling lard and sprin- 
kle with sugar while hot. 

Doughnuts (No, 2). 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sour milk, 
1 teaspoonful of soda, 

3 eggs, 

Butter size of an Q:^g. 
Add flour to make a stiff dough, roll out, and fry in 
hot lard. A little cinnamon can be added if you 
wish. Hattie Gary. 

Eussellville, Tenn. 

Fruit Roll Cookies. 

Sift together 3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, 1 tablespoonf ul of sugar, and a pinch 
of salt. Rub into this 2 tablespoonfuls of butter 
and mix into dough with about 1 cup of sweet milk. 
Sprinkle the board with flour and roll the dough 
into a large square J inch thick; spread 1 ta- 
blespoonful of creamed butter on the dough, then 
spread with 1 cup of sugar and 1 cup of currants or 



CAKES. 209 

seeded raisins chopped fine. Grate a little nutmeg 
over it all and roll up tight like any fruit roll; cut in 
slices about f inch thick and lay them apart in well- 
buttered pans. Bake in a quick oven ten or twelve 
minutes. These are nice for tea or luncheon. 

Nondescripts. 

Yolks of 4 eggs beaten light, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 
flour-enough to make a stiff dough; beat the dough 
well, roll as thin as paper, cut out with a biscuit 
cutter, fold twice, and cut with a knife into narrow 
strips only united at the point. Fry in plenty of 
boiling lard and sprinkle pulverized sugar thickly 
over them as soon as taken out of the lard. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. H. EnlOE. 

Roll Jelly Cake. 
3 eggs beaten separately, 

1 cup of sugar, 

2 tablespoonfuls of sweet milk, 
1 cup of flour sifted with 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder. 
Beat the yolks light, add the sugar and milk, beat 
well together. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, then 
thoroughly with the yolks and sugar; then stir in 
quickly the flour with the baking powder sifted in 
it. Flavor with lemon and bake immediately in a 
thin layer in a large biscuit pan in a moderately hot 
oven. Turn it out on a damp cloth, spread jelly 
over the cake, and roll it up quickly while hot. 
Sprinkle powdered sugar over it while warm. Serve 
in slices cut crosswise. It is better to make two 
rolls than to double the receipt for a large roll. 
14 • 



210 TENNESSEE MODEL HO USEHOLD G UIDE, 

Chess Cakes (No. 1). 
J pound of butter, 
J pound of sugar, 
Yolks of 8 eggs, 
1 tablespoonful of flour, 
I teaspoonful of baking powder dis- 
solved in 
1 tablespoonful of cream. 
Flavor with nutmeg. 
Beat till very light ; bake in pastry. 

NashviUe, Tenn. MrS. W. R. BrYAN. 

Chess Cakes (No. 2). 
1 cup of butter, 
2| cups of sugar, 
Yolks of 12 eggs. 
White of 1 egg, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 
1 tablespoonful of cornstarch or flour, 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder. 

Mix well, flavor with lemon, add a pinch of salt, and 
bake it on open crust. 

Chess Cakes (No. 3). 
Yolks of 5 eggs, 

2 cups of sugar, 

2 tablespoonf uls of meal, 

1 large spoonful of butter, 

1 cup of sw^eet milk. 

Nutmeg or vanilla. 
Pour it into crusts and bake; then beat the whites to 
a stiff froth with 2 spoonfuls of w^hite sugar, put it 
over the custards, and put back to brown. 

Nashville. Tenn. MrS. FlORRIE DoDD. 



CAKES. 211 



Chess Cakes (No. 4). 

1 cup of butter, 

3 cups of sugar, 

6 eggs well beaten. 
Put sugar and butter on and let come to a boil, boil- 
ing five minutes. Stir slowly into eggs, well-beaten 
yolks and whites together; beat well together, fla- 
vor to taste, and pour in rich patties and bake. Ex- 
cellent. Mrs. a. p. McFerrin. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chess Cakes (No. 5). 
Eight eggs, leaving out the whites of 4 for me- 
ringue. Beat the eggs thoroughly, add 1 cup of su- 
gar and 1 tablespoonful of flour. Heat IJ cups of 
water to boiling point, add J cup of butter; when 
melted stir rapidly into eggs and sugar. Bake on 
pastry. Whip the whites of eggs stiff, add 1 cup of 
sugar, and spread on top of cakes ; brown slowly. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. L. KiRBY. 

Almond Macaroons. 
One-half pound of almonds blanched and pound- 
ed with 1 teaspoonful of lemon extract till a smooth 
paste; add an equal quantity of powdered sugar and 
the beaten whites of 2 eggs, working it well together 
with a spoon. Dip your hands in cold water and 
work the mixture into balls size of a nutmeg, lay 
them on buttered white paper or tins, dip your 
hands in cold water, and smooth them over the top. 
Set them in a cool oven three-quarters of an hour. 
Cocoanut macaroons are made the same way. 

Nashville, Teivi, MrS. C. H. A. GeRDING. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 

THE eggs should be cold and also the dish on 
which thej are beaten. Allow for the white 
of 1 egg L cuij (not heaped) of powdered sugar. A 
little lemon juice or tartaric acid added to icing- 
while being beaten makes it white and more fr(;tli.v. 
FlaA'orings most used are vanilla, lemon, chocolate, 
almond, rose, and orange. Set the cake in a cool 
oven with the door open to dry or in an open win- 
dow. 

Icing. 

Whites of 4 eggs, 

4 cups of sifted powdered sugar, 

1 teaspoonful of cream of tartar or citric acid. 
Break the whites into a broad cold dish, throw a 
small handful of sugar on them hefore you begin 
beating; beat it with long, even strokes. In a few 
minutes add more sugar, and keep adding at inter- 
vals until all is used up. Beat icell until icing is 
smooth and of fine, firm texture. Juice of 1 lemon 
may be used instead of cream of tartar or acid, al- 
lowing a little more sugar for the additional liquor. 
Use any flavor desired. 

Boiled Icing (No. 1). 
1 cup of granulated sugar, 
•J teaspoonful of cream of tartar, 
^ cup of boiling water. 

Boil all of these together until it spins a long thread; 

beat the white of 1 egg to a stiff froth, then add the 

sirup, beating it all the time until cold and thick. 

Flavor. Mattie Duncan. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

(212) 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 213 



Boiled Icing (No. 2). 

Boil 1 heaping cup of sugar and J cup of water to 
a thick sirup, pour it, beating constantly, over the 
stiff-beaten white of 1 egg. If icing is not quite 
stiff enough, take J teaspoonful of baking powder 
and beat into it briskly. Ann Eliza Hatcher. 

Eagle Creek, Tenn. 

Boiled Icing (No. 3). 

3 cups of sugar (fine is best), 

^ cup of hot water. 
Boil icWioiit stirring it until thick, then pour it over 
the beaten whites of 3 eggs; add the juice of 1 small 
lemon, beat all together until cool and thick. Can 
use 1 teaspoonful of cream of tartar instead of the 
lemon juice. The more you beat icing the whiter 
it is. 

Boiled Icing (No. 4). 

2 cups of sugar. 

J teaspoonful of cream of tartar. 
Enough water to mix well, then boil until it ropes 
like candy. Beat the whites of 3 eggs to a stilf 
froth with 1 cup of sugar, then pour over this the 
boiling sirup, and after beating well add another 
cup of dry sugar. Flavor to taste. Use XXXX 
sugar. Mrs. Len F. Davis. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Boiled Icing (No. 5). 

2 cups of sugar. 

Whites of 2 eggs. 
Boil the sugar, adding water enough to dissolve it, 
until it ropes. Have the eggs well beaten in a deep 
dish, stir the hot sugar into them, beat until perfect- 
ly smooth, and spread it on the cake before it gets 
cold. Sallib Cross Shelton. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn.' 



214 tenni:ssee model household guide, 

Boiled Icing (No 6). 

2 cups of sugar, 

Whites of 3 eggs. 
Dissolve the sugar in a little water and cook to a 
thick sirup, pour it over the well-beaten whites of 
eggs, beat it well, and spread it on the cake. 

^ Nashville, Tenn. MrS. FlORRIE DoDD. 

Icing without Eggs. 
For 1 small cake take 1 tablespoonful of water, 
add 1 cup of XXXX sugar, and beat until smooth 
and light. Spread on cakes after they are cool and 
set in a cool place to dry. Two spoonfuls of sugar 
set in the oven and browned and added to the above 
will give a chocolate color and impart a fine flavor. 

Chestnut Cluff, Tenn. MrS. J. B. PaRKER. 

Marshmallow Filling. 

Mix 3 cups of granulated sugar with 1 cup of 
water, let boil until it will fall from a spoon like a 
hair, then beat into it J pound of marsh mallow 
candy until it is dissolved. Then pour the mixture 
into the whites of 3 well-beaten eggs, stirring it all 
the time until cold. Then put between layers, on 
top, and on sides of cake. 

Franklin, Tenn. MrS. GeORGE W. SmITHSON. 

Filling for Ice Cream Cake. 

6 cups of white sugar, 

2 cups of water. 
Cook till candied, then pour it over the whites of 6 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and beat thoroughly 
until smooth. Add 2 teaspoonfuls of extract of 
lemon and 1 teaspoonful of citric acid. Put on 
cakes at once. Mrs. Byed Mureay. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 215 



Lemon Cream Filling. 

4 lemons (grated rind and juice), 

1 pound of sugar, 

i pound of butter, 

6 eggs. 
Boil until as thick as honey. Spread between cake 
when cool. Mrs. Bettie L. Wilson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Ambrosia Filling. 

2 lemons grated, 

i pound of sugar, 

J cup of butter, 

Yolks of 3 eggs. 
Beat all together well, adding the butter last, cook 
in a double vessel until clear like honey. Let cool, 
and spread on cake. Mrs. Florrie Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Ice Cream Icing. 

Whip the whites of 3 eggs, then stir in gradually 
XXX confectioner's sugar until thick enough to 
spread with a knife. Just before putting on the 
cake add 2 scant teaspoonfuls of royal baking pow- 
der and flavor with vanilla, nectarine, or orange ex- 
tract. This is enough for a three-layer cake, also 
for the outside. Mrs. J. L. Kirby. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Caramel Filling (No. 1). 

Take 2 cups of sugar, add 1 cup of milk with a 
pinch of soda in it, lump of butter size of an eggy and 
let this cook; brown 1 cup of sugar, mix it in, and 
let cook until done. 



216 tiJNNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

— ' Caramel Filling (No. 2). 
Three cups of white sugar; take 1 cup of the sugar 
and brown it in a flat pan, stir it constantly until it 
melts and browns. Put 2 cups of the sugar in with 
1 cup of sweet milk and 1 tablespoonful of butter, let 
it boil good, then pour in the browned sugar, and 
stir until done. Beat it until cold enough to spread. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. R. T. MoRRISON. 

Caramel Filling (No. 3). 

4 cups of sugar, 

^ cup of butter, 

1 cup of cream, 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 

Little chocolate if desired. 

Union City, Tenn. MrS. WiLLIAM WaTERFIELD. 

Caramel Filling (No. 4). 

1 pint of rich milk, 

2 cups of dark brown sugar, 
J cup of butter, 

J cup of water. 
Boil all together until almost candy when dropped 
into ice-cold water. When almost done stir in 2 ta- 
blespoonfuls of vanilla. Let cool a little before 
using. Mrs. Annie Jones. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chocolate Filling (No. 1). 

1 cup of grated sweet chocolate, 

4 cups of sugar, 

IJ cups of butter, 

1 cup of cream. 
Boil together until it grains, stirring it constantly. 
Spread on while it is hot, as it cools rapidly. 

Dixon Springs, Tenn. NaNNIE ALEXANDER DeNNY. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 211 

Chocolate Filling (No. 2). 

3 cups of sugar, 

5 tablespoonfuls of chocolate, 

Lump of butter size of a walnut, 

1 cup of sweet milk. 

Stir it together, put over not too hot fire, boil it 
about five minutes, add 1 tablespoonful of vanilla; 
let it partially cool until it begins to thicken; spread 
between layers. Mrs. Thompson Hill. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Chocolate Filling (No. 3). 

2 cups of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

J cup of butter. 
Boil it five minutes; dissolve 1 cup of grated baker's 
chocolate and add to it, stir it all the time. Let 
cook until it begins to thicken. Flavor with vanilla, 
and when cool put it between layers and on top of 
cake. 

Chocolate Filling (No. 4). 

1 cup of sugar, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

1 cup of grated chocolate. 

Yolks of 4 eggs w^ell beaten. 
Mix thoroughly, pour into a saucepan, and set it in a 
vessel of water and boil until thick. When cool 
add 1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. L. KiRBY. 

Frosting. 

Boil 1 cup of powdered sugar in 2 tablespoonfuls 
of water; take from the fire, add white of 1 egg 
beaten stiff; beat together; add J teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar or a little lemon juice. Flavor to 
taste. A small bit of butter improves it. 



218 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Golden Frosting. 
Use yolks of eggs instead of the whites, and pro- 
ceed exactly as for ordinary icing. 

Gelatin Icing. 
8oak 1 teaspoonful of gelatin in 1 tablespoonful 
of cold water, dissolve it in 2 tablespoonf uls of hot 
water; add 1 cup of powdered sugar, stir it until 
smooth, and spread it before it sets; dry in a cool 
place. 

Cream Filling (No. 1). 

Three eggs well beaten, J cup of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of cornstarch, 2 cups of milk; cook it in a 
double vessel until thick; add a pinch of salt and fla- 
voring. 

Cream Filling (No. 2). 
One cup of rich cream whipped; sweeten, flavor 
with vanilla; cut cold loaf cake into layers, spread 
the filling between and on top. 

Sour Cream Filling. 
Sweeten and flavor to taste 1 cup of thick sour 
cream, beat it well with an egg beater until it is 
quite thick, smooth, and light, and spread it between 
layers of cake. Serve the cake in slices on a plate, 
using a fork to eat it with. Mrs. J. B. Love. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Milk Filling (No. 1). 
One cup of sugar, ^ cup of milk; stir the sugar into 
the milk over a slow fire till it boils; boil five min- 
utes without stirring it ; set it in a pan of cold water, 
stir it to a cream, and spread on while it will run. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 219 

Milk Filling (No. 2). 

Whites of 2 eggs beaten with 1 cup of powdered 
sugar, J cup of milk, J cup of flour; stir in it 1 pint 
of boiling milk and let all boil a few minutes. Fla- 
vor. 

CocoANUT Filling (No. 1). 

Grate 1 cocoanut; take | of it, add beaten whites 
of 3 eggs, 1 cup of powdered sugar, and spread it be- 
tween layers. Mix with the other J of the cocoanut 
3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and strew it 
thickly on top of the cake. 

Cocoanut Filling (No. 2). 

Cover the layers with boiled icing and sprinkle 
heavily with grated cocoanut. 

Cocoanut Filling (No. 8). 

One cup of powdered sugar, yolk of 1 egg, juice of 
1 lemon, J of a grated cocoanut, and a little milk; 
cook till thick, put it between layers, and frost with 
3 tablespoonfuls of sugar, white of 1 egg^ and the 
other ^ cocoanut. 

Orange Filling. 

Remove the peel and seed of 2 large oranges, chop 
them fine, add J of a lemon, 1 cup of powdered sugar, 
well-beaten white of 1 egg, and spread it between 
the layers of white cake. 

Orange Icing. 

Whites of 3 eggs well beaten, 2 cups of powdered 
sugar, juice and pulp of 2 sour oranges. 



^20 TENI^ESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Lemon Icing. 
Juice of 2 lemons, Avliites of 2 eggs beaten with 1 
cup of powdered sugar; spread between layers. 

Lemon Jelly Filling. 
Juice of 1 lemon, 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, beat thor- 
oughly, and cook it in a double vessel till thick; 
spread it when cold and frost with powdered sugar. 

Banana Filling. 
Make icing of whites of 2 eggs, IJ cups of pow- 
dered sugar, spread this on layers, cover it thickly 
with sliced or chopped bananas, and squeeze a little 
lemon juice over it. Simply frost the top. 

Apple Filling. 
Grate 3 tart apples, add 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg 
beaten, juice of 1 lemon; mix it together, boil five 
minutes, stirring it all the time. Let cool before 
using. 

Fig Filling. 

One pound of figs chopped fine put in a stewpan 
on the stove, add 1 cup of water, J cup of sugar, and 
let cook till soft and smooth. When cold spread be- 
tween layers. 

Fruit Filling. 

Four tablespoonfuls each of finely chopped citron 
and seeded raisins, J cup of blanched almonds 
chopped fine, \ pound of finely chopped figs. Beat 
whites of 3 eggs stiff, add J cup of sugar; mix thor- 
oughly into this all the chopped ingredients. 

TuTTi Frutti Icing. 
Mix with boiled icing 1 pound each of chopped 
blanched almonds, citron, seeded raisins, candied 
cherries and candied pineapple. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 221 

Nut Frosting. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, 

Sugar to thicken. 

Two handfuls of uuts browned and chopped, stir 

part of these into frosting, sprinkle the rest over the 

top of cake after frosted. Mrs. J. M. Hudson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Nut Filling. 
Boil 1 cup of frosting sugar in 2 teaspoonfuls of 
water, take it from the tire, add the white of 1 e*f!;\^ 
beaten stiff, beat together, and add any kind of nuts 
desired, either chopped or otherwise. 

Almond Filling. 
Whites of 3 eggs beaten with 3 cups of powdered 
sugar; 1 pound of blanched almonds pounded in a 
mortar with a little sugar until a tine paste; add the 
whites of eggs and sugar, flavor with vanilla. Yoii 
can get the almond paste ready made at a confec- 
tioner's. Grated cocoanut added to this makes a 
nice filling. 

Mixed Filling (No. 1). 

One cup of powdered sugar, J cup of hot w^ater, 
let simmer, add white of 1 egg beaten; when cold 
add J cup of chopped seeded raisins, ^ cup of 
chopped hickorvnuts, walnuts, or almonds, J cup of 
grated cocoanut, and 1 tablespoonful of melted 
chocolate. 

Mixed Filling (No. 2). 

Drain 1 can of grated pineapple in a fine sieve, 
blanch and chop fine 1 pound of almonds. Make an 
icing and spread on each layer of cake, then sprinkle 
with grated cocoanut and a layer of pineapple and 
almonds; continue until cake is finished. 

Nashville, TJenn. MrS. MaGGIE GoOCH. 



DESSERTS. 

CUSTARDS or milk should always be cooked in 
a double vessel. If you have no double vessel, 
set vessel containing the material to be cooked in a 
larger vessel containing hot water. Let milk al- 
most come to a boil before adding eggs or thicken- 
ing, then stir it hriskly all the time until well cooked. 
Do not allow it to hoil, or it will curdle. Custards 
are lighter if eggs are beaten separately, whites 
stirred in at the last. The lighter the eggs are 
beaten the thicker and lighter the custard. 

To Whip Cream. 
If cream is too rich, it will turn to butter; it should 
be diluted with milk. Too poor cream will not whip 
well either. Have the cream ice cold. While whip- 
ping it stand the bowl in a pan of ice water, skim off 
the froth as it rises. Get a cream whip made for 
the purpose or use an egg beater. 

Cream for Fruit. 
Heat 2 cups of sweet milk to boiling; beat to- 
gether whites of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of white 
sugar, and a piece of butter size of a nutmeg, add J 
cup of cold milk and 1 teaspoonful of cornstarch, 
stir them well together, and add it to the boiling 
milk; cook until it thickens. Set it aside to cool. 
It should be of the consistency of fresh cream ; if it 
is too thick when it gets cold, beat in a little milk. 
A fine substitute for pure cream to be eaten on 
fresh fruit. 
(222) 



DESSERTS. 223 



Boiled Custard (No. 1). 

2 quarts of sweet milk, 
Yolks of 8 eggs well beaten, 
1 tablespoonful of cornstarch. 
Put the milk in a double vessel on the stove, let it 
get hot, but not boil ; dissolve the cornstarch in a lit- 
tle cold milk and stir it into the hot milk, add a 
pinch of salt, and sweeten it to taste. Stir into the 
hot milk gradually the well-beaten yolks, stir it ^H 
the time until it thickens, flavor to taste, and then 
pour it into a dish to get cold. Beat the whites of 
eggs until as stiff as can be beaten, pour over them 
boiling water to cook them, and put in custard 
glasses a layer of custard and whites alternately. 
If you like, grate a little nutmeg over the top of each 
layer. 

Boiled Custard (No. 2). 

To 1 gallon of milk add 16 eggs, whites and yel- 
lows beaten separately, 1 tablespoonful of sugar to 
an egg. Mrs. J. W. Johnson. 

Clifton, Tenn. 

Baked Custard. 

To 1 quart of new milk add 6 eggs well beaten, 6 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, a pinch of salt, and flavor 
with nutmeg. Fill baking cups with the mixture 
and set them in a pan of hot water and place in a hot 
oven. As soon as you can plunge a silver spoon 
handle into the custard without custard clinging to 
it take out, as they will turn to whey if baked longer. 
Serve cold. Mrs. J. H. Fullton. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



224 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Snow Custard. 

Soak J box of gelatin in 2 cups of cold water one 
hour, then add to this 2 cups of boiling water; stir it 
until the gelatin is thoroughly dissolved. Add 2 
cups of sugar and juice of 3 lemons. Let the gelatin 
get cold, beat whites of 3 eggs to a stiff froth, whip 
the whites into the gelatin a little at a time: whip it 
steadily until all is stiff and pour it into cups which 
have been wet with cold water; set them in a cold 
place to congeal. Turn them into a glass dish and 
serve with cooked custard made of the yolks of eggs, 
2 cups of sweet milk, sweetened and flavored to 

taste. 

Charlotte. 

Let 1 gallon of cream come to boiling heat, 
dissolve ^ box of gelatin; beat 8 eggs, yolks au'l 
whites separately, and stii' into the cream, whipping 
all the time; add the gelatin, sweeten and flavor to 
taste. Mrs. Robert Purdy. 

Henderson, Tenn. 

Charlotte Russe (No. 1). 

One quart of whipped cream, whites of 6 eggs well 
whipped, 6 tablespoonfuls of sugar, a pinch of gel- 
atin dissolved. Flavor with vaniHa. This is the 
best I ever ate. Mrs. W. H. Bumpas. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Charlotte Russe (No. 2). 
One-half box of Cooper's gelatin soaked in 1 pint 
of cold water ten minutes; put it over the fire until 
dissolved. When nearly cold beat it with an egg 
beater until nearly stiff, then add the beaten whites 
of 6 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, vanilla to taste, 1 pint of 



DESSERTS. 225 



whipped cream. Have ready 1 pint of whipped 
cream to put on top. Miss Glass. 

Brownsville, Tenn. 

Charlotte Russe (No. 3). 

1 pint of fresh milk, 

J box of gelatin dissolved in the milk. 
Let come to a boil ; have ready the whites of 2 eggs 
beaten with sugar, and put in the milk, stirring it 
rapidly until the eggs are cooked. Flavor this cus- 
tard to taste and let it cool. Whip to a stiff froth 1 
quart of rich cream, sweeten, stir in the custard, 
and let stand until congealed. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. AlEX M. RaLSTON. 

Charlotte Russe (No. 4). 
Take 2 tablespoonfuls of gelatin and soften in 
cold water sufficient to cover; when well soaked add 
a little boiling w^ater to dissolve it and 4 heaping 
teaspoonfuls of granulated sugar; when cool strain 
slowly into 1 pint of rich cream that has been chilled 
in ice and whipped to a stiff froth, beating all the 
time while the gelatin is being put in. Flavor to 
fancy. Mrs. Ava Herstein. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Charlotte Russe (No. 5). 
One quart of rich cream, J box of gelatin, whites 
of 4 or 5 eggs; dissolve the gelatin in ^ cup of hot 
water after it has soaked in enough cold water to 
soften it. Beat the eggs very light, then add 1 cup 
of sugar, and whip the cream very stiff. Beat the 
gelatin in the egg and sugar, then into the whipped 
cream. Flavor with vanilla. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. JoHNELLA CoRBETT. 

15 • 



226 TIJNNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Blanc-mange. 

Heat in a double vessel 1 quart of milk, stir in 4 ta- 
blespoonfuls of cornstarch, wet with a little cold 
water, add a little salt, cook together five minutes. 
Then add yolks of 3 eggs beaten light with 1 cup of 
sugar and cook two minutes longer, stirring it all 
the time. Kemove mixture from the fire and beat 
in the beaten whites while it is boiling hot. Pour it 
into a mold wet with cold water and set it in a cold 
place. Serve with cream. 

Kaspberry Blanc-mange. 

Stew nice, fresh raspberries, strain off the juice, 
sweeten it to taste, place it over the fire, and when it 
boils stir in cornstarch wet in cold water, allowing 
2 tablespoonfuls to each pint of juice. Continue 
stirring it until sufficiently cooked. Pour into 
molds wet in cold water and set it away to cook 
Serve with cream and sugar. Other fruits can be 
used instead of raspberries. M. C. Starnes. 

rranklin, Tenn. 

Spanish Cream. 

Four eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 quart of milk, J box 
of gelatin dissolved in 1 pint of warm water. Beat 
yolks of eggs with the sugar, add the milk, and cook 
like custard. Take off stove and add beaten whites, 
stir well for a few minutes, add gelatin and 1 tea- 
spoonful of strained lemon juice. Put into well -wet 
molds and set on ice to harden. Serve with whipped 
or plain cream. 



DESSERTS. 227 



Russian Cream. 
Take 4 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 quart of milk, ^ box 
of gelatin; dissolve the gelatin in 1 cup of cold water, 
beat the eggs and sugar togetlier until very light 
and cook with the milk like custard. Take it from 
the stove and add the gelatin; stir it rapidly for a 
few minuses, flavor with vanilla, and pour it into a 
dish to harden. Serve with cream. 

Peach Cream. 
Peel and cut into small pieces nice, ripe peaches 
until you have prepared 1 quart. Beat yolks of 3 
eggs with 1 cup of sugar, mix with 2 cups of sweet 
milk, and put the peaches in the mixture; put in a 
pudding dish and bake until almost firm, then stir 
into it thoroughly the beaten whites, and bake a 
light brown. Serve cold. Can use canned peaches. 

Chocolate Cream. 

1 pint of cream, 

1 cup of milk, 

1 scant cup of sugar, 

4 box of gelatin, 

1 square of chocolate. 
Soak the gelatin in J cup of milk and whip the cream 
to a stiff froth; grate the chocolate, add 2 table- 
spoonfuls of hot water, and stir it over a hot fire 
until smooth and glossy. Have remainder of milk 
boiling, stir the chocolate into it, add the gelatin, 
set it in a pan of ice water, beat until it begins to 
thicken, add the whipped cream, and pour it into 
molds. Mrs. T. B. King. 

Brownsville, Tenn, 



228 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Cream Pie. 

Two eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 2 tablespoonf uls of corn- 
starch. Beat the eggs, sugar, and cornstarch to- 
gether, boil 1 pint of sweet milk (flavor just as it 
boils), stir in the mixture, and stir it all the time till 
it thickens. Before it cools add 1 tablespoonful of 
butter. Take 3 eggs, 1 cup of sugar. IJ cups of flour 
with 1 teaspoonful of baking powder sifted in it, 4 
cup of boiling water, stir the eggs and sugar to- 
gether, add the water and then the flour, bake it in 4 
layers, and put it together with the cream. Serve 
cold with rich, hot sauce. Maggie M. Webber. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Transparent Pudding. 

Yolks of 10 eggs, whites of 2 eggs, 1 pound of su- 
gar, J pound of fresh butter, season with nutmeg or 
lemon. Make your pastry (you may put a layer of 
citron, pineapple, or any kind of fruit on it), and pour 
mixture over it. Bake, and then beat whites of eggs, 
adding white sugar to stiffen, and pour over, and 
bake for a few minutes. Mrs. C. W. McG. 

Franklin, Tenn. 

Bisque Glace. 

Three pints of rich cream well sweetened; beat 4 
eggs separately, mix them, and stir in the cream. 
Make a moderately stiff batter of the cream by add- 
ing stale sponge cake grated fine or macaroons 
moistened with cream. Beat until smooth and 
merely scald it in a porcelain kettle (it must not 
boil). When cool flavor with lemon or vanilla and 
freeze stiff. Miss Glass. 

\ '■ Brownsville, Tenn. 



DESSERTS. 229 



Frozen Mous-se. 
Sweeten and Havor to taste 1 quart of rich cream, 
whip it stiff, pour into oblong tin box greased, pack 
thoroughly in ice and salt, and let stand one and one- 
half to two hours before serving. When ready to 
serve dip the box in boiling water, turn out on a plat- 
ter, and cut in slices at table. Eat with forks. 

Nashville, Teun. MrS. R. T. MoRRISON. 

Frozen Pudding. 
To 1 pint of milk and 1 quart of cream allow 1 pint 
of sugar, a scant J cup of flour, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of gelatin, 1 pound of French candied fruit, 1 
tablespoonful of vanilla. Heat the milk to boiling, 
beat together the eggs, 1 cup of sugar and flour, stir 
them into the hot milk, and cook a few minutes; 
then add the gelatin, which has been soaking two 
hours in cold water, enough to cover it. When the 
mixture is cool add the flavoring, the rest of the su- 
gar and cream, freeze fifteen minutes, then add the 
candied fruit, and finish freezing. Take out the 
beater, pack the pudding down smoothly, and let it 
set for one hour or more. When ready to serve dip 
the mold in hot water, turn out the pudding, and 

serve. 

Delicate Dessert. 

Scald 1 quart of milk, beat whites of 4 eggs stiff, 
add 8 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of fla- 
voring, and pour the hot milk over this, beating it all 
the time; pour it into buttered cups, set it in a pan 
of boiling water, and bake until firm in a moderate 
heat. Place in cellar or on ice until ready to serve; 
turn out on plates to serve. Mrs. J. M. Hudson. 

Nashville, Tenn 



230 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Cherry Delight. 
Seed cherries, sweeten, and let simmer until juice 
is thick. Pour 1 quart of milk over a loaf of grated 
bread, add jolks of 3 eggs well beaten, a little flour, 
a large lump of butter, and mix it with cherries; put 
it into a buttered pan and steam or bake. Make me- 
ringue of w^hites of the eggs and a little sugar for the 
top, brow^n lightly; serve with or without sauce, as 
you like. 

Ambrosia. 

Slice oranges or pineapple, or half and half of 
each, in a glass bowl; sprinkle with powdered sugar, 
add a layer of grated cocoanut, and so on in alter- 
nate layers until the bowl is full, having a layer of 
grated cocoanut and sugar on top. Serve with cake. 

Gelatin Jelly. 
Soak 1 large box of Cox's gelatin in 1 pint of cold 
water until it is soft; add 3 pints of boiling water 
gradually, stirring it well until the gelatin is dis- 
solved, add juice of from 7 to 9 lemons, and sugar 
enough to make very sweet, also a pinch of salt. 
Strain it through a thick cloth or flannel bag and 
put it on ice or in a cold place to congeal. Serve 
with cream. You can add to this jelly any kind of 
fruits desired; grated pineapple, minced oranges, or 
peaches are nice. Or you can color it with fruit 
coloring and fix it in many fancy ways. 

TuTTi Frutti Jelly. 
Soak J box of gelatin in J pint of cold water, dis- 
solve with 1 pint of boiling water, add juice of 3 
lemons and 2 cups of sugar, strain it, and add a tiny 
bit of salt. When beginning to stiffen put in a glass 



DESSERTS. 231 

dish a layer of jelly, then a layer of sliced bananas, 
layer of jelly, a layer of sliced oranges, layer of jelly, 
a layer of grated cocoanut, and finish with a layer of 
jelly. Serve with whi^Dped or plain cream. 

Orange Jelly. 
1 box of Nelson's gelatin, 
1 J pounds of sugar, 
5 lemons (juice only), 

1 pint of orange juice, 

2 quarts of filtered water. 
Whites of 3 eggs, shells thrown in. 

Dissolve the gelatin in 1 pint of the water, cold, 
soaking it twenty minutes or more; boil the other 3 
pints of water, add the sugar, lemon juice, whites of 
eggs beaten stiff, and shells. Put the mixture on 
the stove and boil it well, take it off and add 
the oraDge juice, and strain through a flannel 
hag. Set it on ice or in a cool place to congeal. 
Make the day before using, unless in very cold 
weather, and it has time to congeal. Serve with 
cream. 

Apricot Jelly. 
Drain the sirup from 1 can of California apricots ; 
soak J box of gelatin in | pint of cold water ten min- 
utes; juice of 1 lemon and grated yellow rind boiled 
in J cup of w^ater, pour this boiling hot over the gel- 
atin, stirring it all the time until dissolved; add the 
sirup and 2 cups of sugar, let stand a few minutes, 
and pour over the fruit. This is a pretty dish when 
the fruit is firm and in clean-cut halves. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. HaTTIE MaTTHEWS. 



232 TENNi:SSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Fruit Salad. 
Slice 6 oranges, 6 bananas, and 1 can of pine- 
apple with 1 can of white cherries, alternate layers 
sprinkled with powdered sugar; squeeze juice of 3 
more oranges, and over all put white and rose gel- 
atin in small squares. Mrs. A. W. Brockway. 

Brownsville, Tenn. 

Fruit Sponge. 
Make a sirup by boiling 1 cup of sugar in 1 cup of 
water until clear; in this sirup cook until perfectly 
soft 1 quart of fresh or canned peaches or apricots 
or the same quantity of highly flavored, tart apples 
sliced, but not peeled. While the fruit is boiling 
soak 1 ounce of gelatin in enough cold water to cover 
it; into this squeeze the juice of 2 lemons, put it into 
the hot fruit, and stir it well until it is fully dis- 
solved. Press the fruit through a sieve or colander 
that is not too coarse and beat it well with an egg 
whip. When cold, before it has stiffened, stir in the 
whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff, pour into a wet mold or 
into small molds, and set it on ice or in a cold place 
to harden. Serve with cream, or make a custard 
sauce of the yolks of the eggs and serve with the 
sponge after it has been turned out upon the serving 
dish. 

Prune Shape. 

1 pound of prunes, 

1 ounce of gelatin, 

1 cup of sugar, 

3 cups of water. 
Stew the prunes in 2 cups of water until tender, 
stone them, melt the gelatin in the other cup of 



DESSERTS. 233 



water, add it to the prunes, and let simmer a short 
time. Put it in a mold and when cold serve with 
cream. Mrs. Philip Hill. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Apple Snow, 

Stew some nice tart apples until soft, strain them 
through a fine wire sieve, and sweeten to taste; 
break into 3 cups of strained apples the whites of 2 
eggs, whip them together briskly till quite stiff, and 
serve cold with cream. 

Jellied Apples. 
Butter a quart pudding dish and fill it with layer§^ 
of thinly sliced tart apples; sprinkle every two layers 
with 1 tablespoonf ul of sugar and every two or three 
layers with a little ground cinnamon or other flavor- 
ing. At the last pour over the whole 1 cup of cold 
water and cover it closely with a buttered plate that 
fits into the dish and presses upon the fruit. Set 
the pudding dish in a pan of hot water in the oven 
nnd cook slowly three or four hours. When cold it 
can be turned from the dish in a jellied mass. Serve 
in slices with whipped cream or cold custard and 
sweet crackers, cookies, or any kind of cake. 

Stewed Apples. 
Peel and core nice apples, put them into a sauce- 
pan, add 1 cup of sugar to 1 dozen apples and enough 
water to cover them; put in to cook with them a few 
whole cloves and some sticks of cinnamon. Boil 
slowly until apples are tender, lift them out care- 
fully, and boil the sirup until thick, adding a little 
lemon juice if liked; strain it and pour it over the 
fruit. Serve cold. 



234 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Stewed Pears. 
Peel and cut out the cores with a small-bladed 
knife, leaving stem on them; then prepare them just 
as stewed apples are prepared. 

Baked Quinces. 
Take ripe quinces, peel and quarter them, cut out 
the seeds, stew them in clear water until tender, 
and put them into a baking dish with J cup of sugar 
to every 8 quinces; pour over them the water they 
were stewed in, cover closely, and bake one hour. 
Take out the quinces, boil the sirup until thick, and 
pour it over the quinces. Serve cold. 

Fruit Cups. 

2 well-beaten eggs, 

2 cups of sweet milk, 

A little salt, 

2J cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 

1 tablespoonful of melted butter. 
Make into a batter; grease baking cups, fill them 
half full with alternate layers of the batter and ap- 
ples (or peaches, or other fruits) chopped fine ; sprin- 
kle with sugar. Set the cups in a pan half filled 
with boiling water, and bake. Serve hot with 
cream and sugar or sauce. You can chop the fruit 
fine and beat it in the batter if you prefer it to the 
layers. 

Cranberry Puffs. 

2 well-beaten eggs, 

1 pint of flour with 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted 
in it, 

J teaspoonful of salt, 
1 level tablespoonful of lard or butter. 
Use enough sweet milk to make a batter a little 



DESSERTS. 235 



thicker than for cakes; pick and wash 1 pint of 
cranberries and stir them in the batter. Grease G 
baking cups thoroughly with butter, fill them half 
full of the batter, set them in a steamer closely cov- 
ered, and let steam one hour. Serv^ warm with rich 
sauce. Mrs. J. C. Morrison. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Raisin or Currant Puffs. 
J cup of butter, 

1 cup of sugar, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

1 cup of sweet milk, 

2 cups of flour sifted with 

2 teaspoonf uls of baking powder, 

1 cup of raisins seeded and chopped, or 

1 cup of currants washed and dried. 

Mix well and steam in greased baking cups one hour. 

Serve with sauce. 

Salted Almonds (No. 1). 
Blanch J pound of almonds by pouring boiling 
water over them ; let remain in water until cool and 
the skins will readily slip off. Dry them in a cloth, 
put with them 1 tablespoonful of melted butter and 
1 teaspoonful of salt, stir them till well mixed, 
spread them in a baking pan, and bake fifteen min- 
utes or until a delicate brown; stir them often. 
Place them in small, fancy dishes on the table at be- 
ginning of dinner. Salted peanuts are also good. 

Salted Almonds (No. 2). 
Place blanched almonds in a corn popper and 
shake it rapidly over the hot stove or fire until the 
almonds are roasted evenly to a light hroxvn. Dis- 
solve some gum arable, pour it over the almonds, 
stir them until they are well coated, sprinkle them 
with fine sal.t, and spread them on a pan to dry. 



ICES. 

ENUINE ice cream is made with pure cream, 
but for family use there are other ices just as 
good, if not quite so rich as when made of pure 
cream. Use a " Lightning" or some other good pat- 
ented freezer with crank and a revolving dasher. 
In freezing use finelp cracked ice and plenty of salt. 
Pack the freezer with alternate layers of ice and salt 
until the tub is filled, being careful not to get salt 
inside of the freezer. Turn the freezer rapidly. 
Should the ice melt very fast, you may have to turn 
off the water and pack it again with ice and salt. 
Turn it until the mixture is frozen too hard to turn 
it with the dasher in; remove the dasher, close the 
freezer tigJithj, putting a cork or paper in the hole 
made by removing the dasher; pack with ice and 
salt, cover all with a carpet or blanket, and set it 
aside until ready for use. 

Pure Ice Cream. 
2 quarts of cream, 
1 pound of sugar. 
Beat them together, flavor to taste, and freeze. 

Vanilla Ice Cream (No. 1). 
1 quart of milk, 
1 quart of cream, 
i box of gelatin. 
Whites of 3 eggs. 
Dissolve the gelatin in some of the milk, whip the 
(236) 



ICES. 237 

cream, beat the whites of eggs, stir all together, 
sweeten and flavor with vanilla, and freeze quickly. 

Vanilla Ice Cream (No. 2). 

Allow to 2 quarts of rich cream 1 pint of milk 
with 1 pound of sugar and 1 teaspoouful of vanilla. 

Vanilla Ice Cream (No. 3). 

1 quart of cream, 

1 dozen macaroons, 

J teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Sweeten the cream to taste, dry the macaroons, 
powder and sift them, add them to the cream, then 
add the vanilla, and freeze. 

Custard Ice Cream (No. 1) 

Sweeten 2 quarts of milk, put it into a double ves- 
sel over the fire, and let it get hot ; then stir in 1 ta- 
blespoonful of cornstarch mixed smooth with a lit- 
tle cold milk. Let it cook until it thickens, stir la 
gradually 6 eggs which have been well beaten, let 
cook two or three minutes, stirring it all the time, 
let it get cold, flavor, and freeze it. 

Custard Ice Cream (No. 2). 

1 quart of sweet milk, 

2 cups of sugar, 

3 eggs well beaten, 

2 teaspoonfuls of cornstarch. 
When this is done and cool add 1 quart of rich 
cream, flavor to taste, and freeze. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. SaLLIE CrOSS ShELTON. 



238 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Chocolate Ice Cream. 

1 quart of milk, 

2 cups of sugar, 

2 eggs well beaten, 

5 tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate. 
Heat the milk, add the sugar, stir in slowly the well- 
beaten eggs and the chocolate, melted in a little 
milk. Cook until it thickens, stirring it constantly. 
Let it cool, flavor with vanilla, and freeze. 

Peach Ice Cream. 

1 quart of cream, 

1 quart of milk, 

1 pound of sugar, 

1 quart of strained peach pulp. 
If peaches are acid, it will require more sugar. Cut 
up fine 2 or 3 peaches and add them just before freez- 
ing is completed. 

Fruit Ice Cream. 
To 1 pint of fruit juice allow 1 pint of cream, 
sweetened to taste. Have good, ripe fruit, sweeten 
it, chop and mash it, and strain it through a fine 
sieve or coarse cloth; beat the cream and fruit to- 
gether, put the mixture in the freezer, and freeze it. 
You can use rich milk instead of cream by adding 1 
tablespoonful of gelatin dissolved in water. 

Pineapple Ice Cream. 
1 quart of cream, 
1 pint of milk, 
1 pound of sugar, 
1 can of grated pineapple. 
Heat the milk to boiling point, stir in the sugar, and 



ICES. 239 



set it aside to cool. When the milk is cold add 1 
pint of the cream and the pineapple, and freeze. 
When half frozen add the remainder of the cream, 
well whipped, and finish freezing. If jow. do not 
like the grated pineapple frozen in the cream, after 
Tou add it to the cooked milk strain it through a 
cloth, squeeze it well to get all flavor of pineapple, 
and then proceed as directed. 

Berry Ice Cream. 

1 pint of cream, 

1 quart of milk, 

1 pound of sugar, 

1 quart of berries, 

1 tablespoonful of gelatin, 

White of 1 egg. 
Mash the berries with the sugar, soak the gelatin in 
enough cold water to cover it, dissolve it in 1 cup of 
hot water; mix together the cream, milk, gelatin, 
and berries, strain it, and when ready to freeze add 
the beaten white of egg. 

Sherbet (No. 1). 
To 1 can of grated pineapple add 1 pint of sugar; 
let stand until you soak 1 tablespoonful of gelatin 
two hours in enough cold water to cover it. Dis- 
solve the gelatin in 1 cup of hot water, pour it over 
the pineapple, add juice of 4 or 5 lemons, 1 pint of 
sugar, 1 quart of water, 1 quart of milk, beaten 
whites of 3 eggs, and freeze. 

Sherbet (No. 2). 

Boil 2 cups of sugar with 1 cup of water until a 
thick sirup; pour this over the well-beaten whites 
of 6 eggs, add the juice of 3 lemons and 1 can of 
pineapple. When ready to freeze add 1 pint of 
thick cream.. Mrs. Alex M. Ralston. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



240 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Sherbet (No. 3). 

1 dozen lemons, 

3 cups of sugar, 

1 can of grated pineapple, 

Whites of 6 eggs. 
Make a lemonade by adding to the lemon juice 3 
pints of water and the sugar, then the pineapple. 
When nearly frozen add the well-beaten whites of 
the eggs. Sallie Cross Shelton. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. 

Apricot Sherbet. 
One can of apricots mashed through a colander, 4 
pints of water, 2^ pints of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of 
gelatin. Soak the gelatin half an hour in cold 
water enough to cover it, and dissolve it with ^ pint 
of boiling water. As it begins to freeze put in the 
whites of 3 eggs whipped. Mattie Duncan. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Lemon Sherbet (No. 1). 
Soak 1 tablespoonful of gelatin in | cup of cold 
water, pour over it f cup of boiling water, add 3 cups 
of cold water, juice of 6 lemons, 2 cups of sugar, and 
stir well. Mrs. Byrd Murray. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Lemon Sherbet (No. 2). 

Take 1 pint of sugar, 1 quart of water, 1 table- 
spoonful of gelatin, juice of 5 lemons; soak the gela- 
tin in a little water, boil 1 cup of the water and dis- 
solve the gelatin in it. Mix the sugar, water, gel- 
atin, and lemon juice together and freeze. If you 
like, you can add 1 cup of cream when it begins to 
freeze and complete the freezing. 



lOES. 241 



Pineapple Sherbet. 
1 can of grated pineapple, 
1 pint of sugar, 
1 quart of water, 

1 tablespoonf ul of gelatin, 
Juice of 4 or 5 lemons. 

Soak the gelatin two hours in enough cold water to 
cov er it, then heat 1 pint of water and dissolve the 
gelatin in it; mix all together, strain, and freeze. 
Can add 1 pint of milk to this just before freezing if 
desired. If not sweet enough, add a little more su- 
gar. 

Orange Sherbet. 

To the juice of 12 oranges and 1 lemon allow 1 
quart of water and 1 tablespoonful of gelatin. Soak 
the gelatin one hour or more in a little cold water, 
then pour over it 1 cup of boiling water, mix all to- 
gether, sw^eeten to taste, strain it, and freeze. 

Berry Sherbet. 

2 quarts of berries, 

1 pint of sugar, 

2 pints of water, 

1 tablespoonful of gelatin. 
Put the gelatin to soak in a little cold water, mash 
the berries and sugar together, and let them stand 
two hours. Add 1 pint of the water to the berries, 
and strain them; heat the other pint of water, and 
dissolve the gelatin in it. Mix together and freeze. 
If berries are acid, more sugar may be required; if 
they are sweet, add juice of 1 lemon. 
16 



242 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Strawberry Sherbet. 

1 box of strawberries well mashed, 
3 cups of sugar, 

2 cups of water, 
IJ pints of cream, 
Juice of 3 lemons. 

Mix together the sugar, water, and cream, and start 
to freeze before adding the strawberries and lemon 
juice Serve in cut glass dish and stick over the 
top large or perfect strawberries. Mrs. S. A. C. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Lemon Ice. 
Juice of 6 lemons, 2 lemons sliced very thin in 1 
pound of granulated sugar; let stand one or two 
hours. Then put in the freezer; after it has been 
packed in ice and very cold add ^ gallon of milk and 
freeze. Do not let stand in the freezer too long be- 
fore serving, as it is very acid. 

Nashville, Tenu. MrS. MaGGIE GoOCH. 

Strawberry Ice. 

2 quarts of berries mashed slightly, 

1 quart of water, 

IJ pounds of sugar. Freeze. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. W. R. BrYAN. 

Cherry Ice. 

2 quarts of cherries, 

1 quart of sugar, 

1 quart of water, 

1 tablespoonful of gelatin. 
Put the gelatin to soak in enough cold water to cover 
it. Seed and mash the cherries; also mash 1 dozen 
of the kernels to a paste and add to the cherries. 
Dissolve the gelatin in a little hot water, then mix 
all together and strain it tlirough a muslin bag and 
freeze. 



DRINKS. 



WATER left in the teakettle overnight must 
never be used for breakfast coffee or tea. 
Water boiled more than once will ruin any coffee or 
tea. Do not boil the water to be used for coffee or 
tea more than three or four minutes before using. 



Substitute for Cream in Coffee. 
Beat white of 1 egg, add a small lump of butter, 
pour the coffee into it gradually, stirring it all the 
time to prevent curdling. This has the flavor of 
fresh cream. Or drop a tiny piece of fresh butter 
into the cup of hot coffee as a substitute for cream. 

Boiled Coffee (No. 1). 

Use 3 heaped tablespoonfuls of ground coffee. 
Mocha and Java mixed, white of 1 egg and part of 
the shell; mix together with enough cold water to 
moisten it good. Add 1 quart of hoiling water, as 
it rises stir it down with a silver spoon, let come to 
a boil, stir it down, and pour in a little cold water to 
settle it. Place it on back of stove to keep Jiot (not 
boil) until ready to serve. Send to the table hot, and 
serve with rich cream and lump sugar. Whip the 
cream if you desire. You can tie the coffee in a 
muslin bag, and not have to use the egg. 

(243) 



244 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Boiled Coffee (No. 2). 
Use a mixture of Mocha and Java; a granite ware 
or blue-and-wliite enamel ware coffee pot. For 8 
cups of strong coffee, into 1 cup of ground coffee stir 
J cup of cold water and the white of 1 egg. Scald 
the coft'eepot, pour in 6 cups of boiling water, then 
stir in the coffee, let boil three or four minutes. 
Stir down and add 1 cup of cold water and let stand 
in a hot place ten minutes. Serve hot with the best 
of cream and sugar. Mrs. J. L. Kirby. 

Kashville, Tenn. 

Filtered or Drip Coffee. 
Use a patented drip coffeepot, allow 1 large ta- 
blespoonful of finely ground coffee (Mocha and Java 
mixed) for each person; to every tablespoonful al- 
low 1 cup of boiling water, pouring it on gradually. 
When filtered, if not as strong as you desire, pour it 
off and filter again. Place on the back of stove to 
keep Jiot (not boil) until ready to serve. Serve Jiot 
with cream and lump sugar. 

Good Coffee. 
Use only best brands of roasted coffee. To make 
1 gallon of coffee use medium-sized cupful of ground 
coffee, put immediately in pot with white of 1 egg, 
pour boiling water over it, let come to a boil, but do 
not boil it. Remove from fire and let settle. 

Chable,Tcnn. RoSE SaLOME.. 

Tea. 

Scald the teapot w^ell, put in the tea, allowing 1 

teaspoonful of tea for each person or 1 cup of boiling 

water. Pour on enough boiling water to cover it 

well and let it stand ten minutes. Keep lid of the 



DRINKS. 245 



pot closed and set it in a warm place, but do not let 
it boil. Pour iu as much boiling water as you will 
need, pour the tea off into a heated China or silver 
teapot, and serve hot. 

Ice Tea. 
Make tea as above, pour it off and let it get per- 
fectly cold. When ready serve in glasses with ice, 
sugar, and slices of lemon if liked. 

Chocolate. 

J cup of grated chocolate, 

1 pint of boiling water, 

1 pint of sweet milk. 
Mix the chocolate smooth with a little cold water 
and stir it into the boiling water; boil fifteen or 
twenty minutes. Add the milk and boil ten min- 
utes more, stirring it often. Sweeten to taste. 
Serve with plain or whipped cream with each cup. 

Cocoa. 

6 tablespoonf uls of cocoa, 

1 pint of boiling water, 

1 pint of milk. 
Mix the cocoa smooth in a little cold water, boil fif- 
teen minutes, add the milk, and boil five minutes 
more, stirring it often. Sweeten to taste in cups as 
it is served. 

Lemonade. 

The juice of 3 lemons to 1 pint of cold water; 
sweeten to taste. 

Lemon Soda. 

Strain juice of 1 lemon, put it in a glass of ice 
water, sweeten to taste, stir well into it a scant J 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little water; drink 
it while it is foaming. 



246 TUJ^NUSSEE 3I0DEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Cream Soda. 

4 pounds of sugar, 

3 pints of water, 

3 nutmegs grated, 

1 ounce of gum arable, 

1 teaspoonful of oil of lemon or other 
fruits. 

Whites of 10 eggs well beaten. 
Place the mixture over a slow fire and stir it well 
about thirty minutes; take it from the fire, strain 
and divide it into 2 parts; into one-half put 8 ounces 
of bicarbonate of soda; into the other half put 6 
ounces of tartaric acid. Put each part in a fruit jar 
to itself, shake them well, and when cold it is ready 
for use by pouring 3 tablespoonf uls from both parts 
into separate glasses, each J full of ice water. Stir 
each and pour them together, and you have a nice 
glass of cream soda. Keep the creams in a cool 
place. 

Kaspberry Vinegar (No. 1). 
6 quarts of red raspberries, 
1 quart of white wine vinegar. 
Pour the vinegar over 3 quarts of the berries and let 
stand overnight; strain it, add the other 3 quarts of 
berries, and let stand overnight; strain it, sweeten to 
taste, boil it fifteen minutes, and bottle hot and air 
tight. Mrs. J. H. Fullton. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Easpberry Vinegar (No. 2). 
Fill a stone jar with ripe raspberries, cover them 
with the purest and strongest vinegar, and let stand 
a week. Pour the whole through a sieve, crushing 



PHINKS. 247 



out all the juice of the berries. To each pint of vin- 
egar add IJ pounds of sugar, boil long enough to 
dissolve, and remove scum. Take off and cool; bot- 
tle and cork tightly. Two tablespoonfuls of this to 
a tumbler of iced water makes a delicious drink. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. W. H. BuMPAS. 

Raspberry Shrub. 

Pick over and wash red raspberries, cover them 
with vinegar, and let stand overnight; next morning 
mash and strain the juice from them, add 1 pint of 
sugar to 1 pint of juice, boil it ten minutes, and bot- 
tle while hot, sealing tight. Mrs. Robert Purdy. 

Henderson, Tenn. 

Strawberry Acid. 
Mash 4 pounds of berries, pour over them 1 quart 
of water in which is dissolved 2 ounces of citric acid. 
Let stand twenty-four hours, strain off, boil four 
minutes. In making use a deep bowl and porcelain 
kettle. Mrs. William Morrow. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Unfermented Wine (No. 1). 

Twenty-five pounds of Concord or any juicy grape. 
Boil them with only water enough to keep from 
burning. When they burst open set them off to 
cool, then press the juice out through a stout jelly 
bag; add nearly 4 pounds of sugar, let come to a 
boiling point, skim carefully, and put up air tight. 
Keep in a cool, dark place. It makes a delightful 
drink and is useful in sickness, being palatable and 
nourishing. Other fruit wines can be made the 
same way. . 



248 TENNmSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Unfeemented Wine (No. 2). 
Select sound ripe fruit, wash it, and boil it with 
enough water to keep it from burning. Let it boil 
until it is soft, or breaks to pieces, strain it through 
a stout bag, squeezing out all the juice. To 1 quart 
of juice add 1 cup of white sugar, let boil fifteen or 
twenty minutes, put up hot and air tight. Diluted 
with water, served with shaved or crushed ice, it 
makes a delightful summer drink. Can make it of 
grapes, berries, cherries, or any juicy fruits desired. 

Grape Juice. 
Cover Concord grapes with cold water, boil until 
the grapes break to pieces, take from the fire, strain 
it, add 1 small cup of sugar to 1 quart of juice, and 
boil fifteen minutes; put up hot and air tight. 

Nashville, Tenn. MeS. J. H. FULLTON. 

Pineapple Eoyal. 
Cover grated or minced pineapple with pure apple 
vinegar, let stand two or three days. Mash, and 
strain it through a bag, squeezing out all the juice, 
to every 3 cups of juice add 2 cups of white sugar. 
Boil it all together ten or fifteen minutes, skim it 
carefully; bottle hot and air tight. A tablespoonful 
in a glass of ice water is a fine summer drink. Rasp- 
berries, blackberries, strawberries, or any kind of 
highly flavored fruit can be used. 

Pineapple Ice. 
Put into a pitcher, grated or minced pineapple, 
sprinkle it heavily with fine white sugar, add juice 
of 1 lemon, pour over it 2 or 3 cups of hot water. 



DRINKS. 249 



Cover the pitcher, and let stand until it is cold, stir- 
ring it occasionally with a spoon, strain it into an- 
other pitcher, and set it in the refrigerator. Add 
more water, and sugar if desired. Serve in glasses 
with crushed ice. 

Stkawberky Ice. 
Mash 1 cup of ripe berries, add J cup of white 
sugar, 1 cup of cold water, and juice of 1 lemon. 
Strain it through a fine sieve, or coarse muslin cloth, 
add more water and sugar if desired. Serve in 
glasses with crushed ice. Can make this ice of any 
kind of berries, and leave out the lemon juice if you 
like. 



CANNED FRUITS. 

LL ripe fruit requires but little cooking, but 
must be put up boiling hot and air tight. 
Have your jars hot by rolling them in a pan of hot 
water; fill each jar to overflowing (for fruit shrinks 
as it cools), put on the top instantly, screw it tightly, 
and as the contents cool screw it again. Use glass 
jars, as you can use them year after year with new 
rubbers. Keep in a dry, cool, dark place. 

Canned Peaches. 
Select large white peaches, ripe but not soft; peel, 
cut in halves, and stone them; drop each piece into 
cold water as soon as it is pared. Allow 1 heaped 
tablespoonful of sugar to each quart of fruit, scat- 
tering it between the layers ; or do not use any sugar, 
just as you desire. Put 1 cup or more of water in 
bottom of kettle, put the fruit in, and heat slowly to 
a boil. See that every piece of fruit is heated 
through. Can hot, cover well with the hot juice, 

and seal. 

Canned Pears. 

Peel the pears, dropping each as it is peeled into 
cold water. Make a sirup, allowing 1 pint of water 
and i pound of sugar to 1 quart of pears. When the 
sirup has come to a boil put in the pears carefully, 
boil until they look clear and are tender. Have 
jars ready rolled in hot water, put in the pears, and 
fill jars to overfiowing with the boiling hot sirup, and 
seal. 

(250) 



CANNED FRUITS. 251 



Canned Quinces. 

Select perfect quinces, pare them carefully, quar- 
ter, and remove the cores. Make a thin sirup of 1 
pound of sugar to IJ pints of water, and when boil- 
ing put in the quinces and let cook for fifteen min- 
utes. Put into self-sealers while hot, screw on the 
tops, and set in a cool, dry place. 

Eagle Creek, Tenn. AnN ElIZA HaTCHER. 

Canned Apples. 

Apples are peeled, quartered, and prepared for 
canning in the same way as peaches and pears. 

Canned Plums. 
Prick each plum in several places with a needle, 
to prevent bursting. Make a sirup, allowing J cup 
of water and J pound of sugar to 3 quarts of fruit; 
when the sugar is dissolved put in the plums, heat 
slowly to a boil. Let them boil five minutes slowly. 
Fill the jars with plums, pour in the boiling hot 
sirup until jars are filled to overflowing, and seal. 
Damsons and greengages are nice put up this way 
for pies or rolls. 

Canned Berries. 

Allow 1 tablespoonful of sugar to 1 quart of ber- 
ries, heat slowly to boiling, boil fifteen minutes, can 
boiling hot, and seal. Blackberries, raspberries, 
huckleberries, strawberries, and seeded cherries can 
all be put up in this way. 



252 tjenness£:e model household guide. 

Canned Fruit Juices. 
Select sound, ripe fruit, wash, and stew it in 1 cup 
of water until it is soft, strain it through a bag, 
pressing out all the juice. To 1 pint of juice allow 1 
cup of sugar; put it in a kettle and heat to boiling 
point. Put it into small bottles while boiling hot, 
and seal air tight. It is a fine substitute for wine or 
brandy in puddings and sauces. Diluted with ice 
water it makes a nice summer drink. 

Canning Fruit. 

For blackberries, etc., take good ripe fruit, place 
it in a large pan or bucket, pour on plenty of cold 
water, take up by handfuls, select the largest and 
best, and heap into the glass jars until all are 
gone over, placing the inferior fruit aside for jam. 
Have ready a sirup made of 1 cup of sugar to 1 quart 
of w^ater for each half-gallon can. When cool fill 
each jar to overflowing, screw on the cap firmly, 
place all in a deep vessel of cold water, and place 
over the fire to cook; the water must reach the top 
of the jars. Boil twenty minutes. Vary the time 
of cooking according to the kind of fruit. 

Cookeville, Tenn. MrS. GeORGE H. MoRGAN. 



PRESERVES AND JELLIES. 

PKUIT for preserving should be sound. Use 
dry white sugar. In the old way of preserv- 
ing we used pound for pound when kept in stone 
jars; now most preserves are put up air tight, and 
less sugar is required, about f pound of sugar to 1 
pound of fruit. Boil in granite ware or porcelain- 
lined vessels. To prevent molding on top cut tliin 
paper to fit, dip it in alcohol, and press it closely on 
top of preserves or jelly before sealing up. If it 
should happen to mold then, it can all be lifted off 
with the paper. KeexD all preserves and jellies in a 
cool, dark place. 

To Kemove Jelly from Molds. 
Set the mold in a pan with enough warm water 
to come to the top of mold; let stand a few minutes, 
wipe the mold dry, place over it the dish that you 
wish the jelly to be turned into; turn both at once 
and remove the mold gently. 

Peach Preserves (No. 1). 
Pare and stone the fruit, weigh it, allowing -| 
pound of sugar to 1 pound of fruit and 1 cup of 
water. Put the sugar and water over the fire after 
it is dissolved; when it is boiling hot put in the 
peaches and let them boil gently until they are clear. 
When they are done take up each half with a spoon 
and spread them on a dish to cool. When all have 
been cooked in the sirup boil the sirup until thick, 

(253) 



254 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

put the peaches in again, and let them get hot. Put 
up air tight in fruit jars. Or jou can prepare the 
peaches and let stand overnight in the sugar (weigh 
the peaches and sugar) and place in layers in a large 
vessel; in the morning cook as directed. 

Peach Preserves (No. 2). 
To 9 pounds of fruit allow 6 pounds of sugar. Put 
the fruit in a porcelain or stone vessel, in layers with 
the sugar, and let stand overnight. In the morning 
add 1 cup of water, boil all together slowly until the 
sirup is thick. Put up in air-tight jars. Pears can 
be made up in the same way. 

Chestnut Bluff, Tenn. MrS. EuGENIE CaRTBR. 

Preserves. 
Pears, quinces, apples, and apricots are all pre- 
served in the same way that peaches are preserved. 

Plum Preserves. 
Weigh the fruit and scald it in boiling water to 
make the skins come off easily. If you do not want 
them peeled, prick the fruit in several places with a 
needle. Let them stand in a bowl one hour after 
they are peeled, drain off the juice, and lay the plums 
in the kettle alternately with layers of sugar, allow- 
ing f pound of sugar to 1 pound of fruit. Pour the 
juice over it and let heat slowly to a boil. Take out 
the plums with a perforated strainer, draining them 
well, and spread them on a large dish in the sun. 
Boil the sirup until it is thick, skim it well, return 
the plums to this, and boil fifteen minutes. Put up 
hot and air tight. Greengages, damsons, -and other 
plums are all preserved in this way. 



PRESER VES AND JELLIES. 25b 

Quince Preserves. 

Pare, core, and quarter perfect quinces. Make a 
sirup of I pound of sugar to 1 pound of quinces and 
1 cup of water; boil and skim, add the quinces, and 
let cook slowly until clear. Put up in glass jars air 
tight and set in a cool, dry place. 

Eagle Creek, Tenn. AnN ElIZA HaTCHER. 

Apple Preserves. 
Peel and core the apples; take 2 gallons of water 
with a piece of lime the size of a walnut, put the 
apples in the water, and let stand overnight. Take 
the apples out and let them soak 6 hours in clear 
water. Make a strong ginger tea and boil the apples 
in it until tender ; take them out, and with the same 
tea make the sirup, allowing f pound of sugar to 1 
pound of apples. Cook the apples in the sirup until 
they are clear. Mrs. Thompson Anderson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Apple Butter. 
Boil down a kettleful of sweet cider to two-thirds 
the original quantity. Peel, core, and slice tart, 
juicy apples and put as many in the cider as it will 
cover; boil slowly, stirring it often with a paddle. 
When apples are done and breaking to pieces take 
them out with a perforated skimmer, draining well 
against the sides of the kettle.^ Put in more applets, 
as many as the cider will hold, and stew soft. Take 
from the fire, pour all together in a large crock, and 
let stand twelve hours. Return to kettle and boil 
down, stirring all the while until soft and brown in 
color. Keep in jars in a cool, dry place. 



256 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

East India Preserves. 

8 pounds of pears, 

8 pounds of sugar, 

4 lemons, 

J pound of crystallized ginger. 
Boil the lemons until tender, peel the pears and slice 
them very thin, weighing them after they are sliced. 
Put the sugar on the fire with 1 pint of water and let 
it melt while preparing the pears. When the lem- 
ons are tender cut them into small pieces, cut the 
ginger as you would citron for cake, put all the in- 
gredients together, and let simmer two hours. Put 
up in tumblers. Mrs. Philip Hill. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Cherry Preserves. 
Stone the cherries, saving all the juice, w^eigh the 
fruit, and allow | pound of sugar to 1 pound of cher- 
ries. Put into a preserving kettle a layer of fruit 
and sugar until all are used up, pour over the juice, 
and boil slowly until the sirup thickens. Put up 
hot and air tight. 



Strawberry Preserves (No 1). 
To 1 pound of berries allow J pound of sugar and 
place in layers of berries and sugar, using no water. 
Set the kettle on back of stove until the sugar is dis- 
solved into sirup, and boil fast for twenty-five min- 
utes. Take out the fruit with a perforated skim- 
mer, boil and skim the sirup five minutes longer, put 
the fruit back into it, and put up in small jars while 
hot. Keep in a cool, dry place. 



PRESER VES AND JELLIES. 25 7 



Strawberky Preserves (No 2). 
Select the verj best and to a measure of berries 
put a measure of sugar. Let it stand one or two 
hours, then in bright tin pans cook quickly, and 
you will have a preserve that will delight the eye 
and taste. Mrs. J. T. Dodd. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Watermelon Preserves. 
Cut the red meat of a watermelon (not too ripe) 
into pieces the size desired, remove the seed, saving 
the juice. Weigh the fruit, allowing J pounds of 
granulated sugar to each pound of prepared melon. 
Make a sirup of the sugar and juice of the melon, and 
when the sirup is about half as thick as desired drop 
in the prepared melon and finish cooking. Put up 
air tight in fruit jars. Mrs. C. B. Huggins. 

Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Jam. 

Weigh the fruit and put it on with a i;en/ little 
water in bottom of kettle to start it to cooking with- 
out burning. Boil thirty minutes, mashing and stir- 
ring it well. Add | pound of sugar to 1 pound of 
fruit and cook until as thick as desired. Put up air 
tight in fruit jars. 

Blackberry Jam. 
To every pound of fruit add f pound of sugar. 
Boil the berries with a little water briskly for half 
an hour; skim well while boiling. Then add the su- 
gar and boil until the sirup is almost jellied. Can 
in fruit jars while hot, and it will keep indefinitely. 

Chestnnt Bluff, Tenn. MrS. EuGENIA CarTEH . 

17 • 



258 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Apple Jelly. 
Select tart apples, rusty coats, horse apples, or 
Siberian crab apples. Wash them thoroughly, cut 
up, peel, core and all, and place them in a porcelain 
kettle; cover them with cold water, let boil until 
fruit is cooked to pieces, take off, and let get cold; 
strain it into a stone vessel, pressing all juice out 
through a stout, coarse bag. Let stand all night in 
a pitcher placed in a refrigerator or a cool place. 
Next morning pour off 3^ cups of juice at a time and 
boil it twenty minutes; skim while boiling. Measure 
3 cups of sugar, put it into a pan in the oven, and 
heat it, stirring it to prevent browning or burning; 
heat as hot as you can bear your hand in it. Throw 
the hot sugar into the boiling juice; do not stir it, 
but make sure that it is all dissolved; let come to a 
boil and remove it from the fire. Roll the glasses in 
hot water and fill them with the hot liquid ; set them 
in the sun, and when the jelly is firm cut thin paper 
to fit, dip it in alcohol and press it closely on top of 
jelly; cover and keep in a cool, dry place. When not 
acid enough to jelly, add lemon juice to make it so. 

Fruit Jellies. 
All fruit jellies are made in the same manner used 
in making apple jelly. 

Orange Marmalade. 
Equal weights of oranges and granulated sugar. 
Quarter and peel the oranges, removing all thick 
inner skin of peel, then boil the peel in clear water 
until tender enough to pierce easily with a straw, 
changing the water once and renewing with hot 
water; this takes off the rank, bitter taste. Prepare 



PRESER VES AN D JELLIES. 259 

the pulp by dividing, removing all seeds and white, 
stringy parts; then cut the pulp very fine. When 
peel is done drain in a colander and cut in fine 
shreds with scissors. Place pulp to boil in a little 
water; after it has boiled a few minutes add sugar 
and shredded peel, boil twenty minutes longer, stir- 
ring it often to prevent burning. Put up in jelly 
glasses as you do jelly. Mrs. J. H. Fullton. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



CANDIES. 

IN making candy use best granulated sugar. For 
hard, brittle candies the sirup should never be 
stirred. For soft candies the sirup should be re- 
moved from fire and when nearly cold stirred to a 
cream. For hard, brittle candies the sugar can be 
kept from graining by adding 1 teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar or vinegar. The foundation of 
nearly all soft candies is known as "French cream." 
This is made by removing boiling sirup from fire be- 
fore it is cooked enough to make hard candy. After 
you have learned to make good '^ cream" quite a va- 
riety of cream candies can be made with very little 
trouble. The "cream" can be colored to suit, using 
any kind of nuts or dry preserved fruits, forming 
into shapes with the hands or little molds made for 
that purpose. 

French Cream. 
Place in a porcelain or granite kettle 6 cups of 
granulated sugar, 2 cups of water, J teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar. Boil it rapidly tcithout stirring it 
until when a little is dropped into cold water it can 
be rolled between the fingers into a soft, creamy 
ball. Remove from fire and leave in the kettle to 
cool. If too hard when tested, add a little water, 
boil again, and test as before. When lukewarm stir 
or beat it with a large spoon or paddle until it is 
creamy and begins to harden on top; then knead it 
(260) 



CANDIES. 261 



with the hands like bread dough until smooth, and it 
is done. It may be kept in this condition several 
days by covering it with a damj) napkin, and will be 
ready for use at any time. Should " cream," by rea- 
son of too long cooking, become hard and crusty, it 
may be reduced to sirup again by adding water and 
reboiling, testing it as before, greater care being 
taken to remove it from the fire at the proper time. 
Practice and patience will make perfect. 

Uncooked Cream. 

Take whites of 2 or 3 eggs, put them into a bowl 
with equal quantity of water, stir in confectioner's 
XXX sugar until the cream is stiff enough to shape 
with the fingers, flavor to taste, and mold to suit 
fancy. This cream is for immediate use. If shapes 
are to be coated, wait several hours after they are 
formed to coat them. 

Chocolate Coating. 

Melt 1 cake of baker's chocolate in a pan or dish 
set in hot water; when melted add a lump each of 
butter and paraffin size of a hickory nut, a few drops 
of vanilla, and stir it thoroughly. Take formed 
creams, one at a time, on the point of a hat pin or 
fork and dip into or pour the melted chocolate over 
them with a teaspoon and slip them upon buttered 
paper. Another way is to place a small quantity of 
cream (foundation) with equal quantity of grated 
chocolate in a bowl with a few drops of vanilla, set 
it in boiling water, when melted dip the creams in, 
and set them, on oiled paper as mentioned. 



262 TENNESSEE MODEL SOVSEHOLD GUIDE, 

CocoANUT Creams. 
Take grated cocoanut and half as much French 
cream, work together until well mixed, and flavor 
with a little vanilla if you like. If too soft to form 
into balls, work in confectioner's XXX sugar until 
stiff enough. Dip them into chocolate coating and 
place on oiled paper. 

Fruit and Nut Creams. 
Seeded raisins, currants, figs, and citron chopped 
fine, mixed with French cream while soft or with 
uncooked cream before sugar is all mixed in. Nuts 
also may be mixed with this cream. Stir into it 
chopped almonds, hickory nuts, English walnuts, 
form into bars, balls, or squares. Several kinds of 
nuts may be mixed or nuts and fruits and dipped in 
chocolate coating if desired. 

Hard Nut Candy. 
Boil together 1 cup of light brown sugar, 1 cup of 
New Orleans molasses, J cup of water, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of vinegar, 1 tablespoonful of butter; as soon as 
the sirup will harden when a little is dropped into 
cold water add freshly roasted peanuts or any kind 
of nuts desired with \ teaspoonful of soda. Pour it 
into buttered tins and when nearly cold cut into 

bars. 

Cocoanut Candy. 

Place in a kettle 2 cups of granulated sugar, J cup 
of water (cocoanut water if you grate the cocoanut 
yourself), 1 teaspoonful of vinegar, lump of butter 
size of a hickory nut, heat slowly until the sugar is 
melted, boil until nearly done, add 2 cups of grated 



CANDIES, 263 



or sliced cocoanut, boil until brittle when dropped 
into cold water. Pour on buttered tins and when 
nearly cold cut into bars. 

Sugar Candy. 
Place in a kettle 3 cups of granulated sugar, J cup 
of water, ^ cup of vinegar, boil ivithout stirring until 
it will crisp in cold water, then add J tablespoonful 
of butter and ^ teaspoonf ul of soda dissolved in hot 
water. Flavor to taste and pour into a buttered 
dish. When cool enough pull it with buttered tips 
of fingers. Stretch it the size you wish, place on 
paper, and break it into sticks with the back of a 
knife blade. 

Molasses Candy (No. 1). 
Place in a kettle 1 quart of New Orleans molasses, 
1 cup of sugar, J cup of vinegar, boil (stir it often) 
until it hardens when a little is dropped into cold 
water; then add butter size of an egg^ 1 teaspoonf ul 
of soda dissolved in hot water, flavor to taste, stir it 
well, and pour into buttered dishes. When cool 
enough pull with buttered tips of fingers until it 
glistens. 

Molasses Candy (No. 2). 

2 cups of molasses, 
1 cup of sugar, 
1 tablespoonful of vinegar, 
Butter size of a hickory nut. 
Boil briskly twenty minutes, stir it often, flavor to 
taste, pour on a buttered dish, and pull it thorough- 
ly when sufficiently cool. Irma Huggins. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



264: TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Homemade Candy. 
The best triple X confectioner's white sugar, 
white of 1 egg, 2 spoonfuls of sweet cream. Mix 
with hand till all the sugar is taken up, then shape in 
different forms, mix some with lemon, vanilla, place 
in different dishes, roll some in cocoanut for drops. 
Put some chocolate in a cup and set it in hot water 
till it is dissolved; shape some in lumps, and dip in 
chocolate. This is simple and delicious. Make one 
day, let stand all night, and it is ready. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. AlICE L. KiNG. 

Cream Caramels. 
Place in a saucepan 4 cups of granulated sugar, .*i 
heaping tablespoonfuls of glucose, and 1 cup of liot 
water; set it where it will soon boil, stir it constant- 
ly, and let cook until it will harden when dropped 
into cold water; then add immediately 1 cup of rich 
cream and a lump of butter the size of an e:gg. Let it 
boil again, stirring it all the time, until it will snap 
when dropped into cold water; then remove it from 
the fire, flavor to taste, and pour it into a buttered 
dish or pan to cool. When it is nearly cold cut it 
into long strips about an inch wide with a large, 
sharp knife that has been buttered to keep it from 
sticking. Remove each strip as it is cut off, and di- 
vide it into pieces an inch long, wrapping each piece 
in paraffin paper. Do not cook the candy directly 
over the fire; have a lid between the kettle and the 
fire. If you cook on a gasoline stove, place a piece of 
sheet iron or an old pie pan under the kettle over the 
burner, and there will not be so much danger of 
scorching the candy. It will scorch in a moment or 



CANDIES. 265 

two after being done if not removed from the fire. 
You can get the glucose at a confectioner's. 

Chocolate Caramels. 
Make them just as you do cream caramels, adding 
I cake of baker's chocolate grated fine when you add 
the cream and butter. When done remove from the 
stove, flavor with vanilla, and pour it out to cool. 
Cut and wrap it as directed for cream caramels. 

CocoANUT Caramels. 
Cook a mixture as for cream caramels. Just as it 
is done add 2 cups of grated cocoanut, stir it once, 
and then pour it out to cool. Or you can pour it 
out to cool and sprinkle the cocoanut thickly over it. 
When cold cut and wrap it. 

Hickory Nut Caramels. 
Cook a mixture as for cream caramels. Just as it 
is done add 2 cups of finely chopped hickory nut ker- 
nels, stir it once, and then pour it out to cool. When 
cool cut and wrap it. 



Butter Scotch (No. 1). 
Boil together 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of molasses, | 
cup of butter, 1 tablespoonful of vinegar, J teaspoon- 
ful of soda. Stir it frequently, to prevent burning; 
as soon as it will snap when dropped into cold 
water remove it from the fire and flavor to taste. 
Pour it on a buttered tin in a sheet \ inch thick. 
When nearly cold check it off into squares with a 
sharp knife, separate the squares when cold, and 
wrap them in paraffin paper. 



266 TENNESSEE MODEL SbUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Butter Scotch (No. 2). 

2 cups of sugar dissolved in water, 
4 teaspoonfuls of butter, 

3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar. 
Boil. Try in cold water. 

Langston, Tenn. MaRY HaRRILL. 



Marshmallows. 

To 24^ pounds of powdered white gum arable add 
1 quart of water; place the vessel containing it in 
another containing water, set it over fire and stir the 
mixture until the gum arable is dissolved. Then add 
4^ pounds of sifted powdered sugar and let it dis- 
solve, stirring it all the time until it is thick, then add 
the whites of 12 eggs beaten stiif, and stir it until it 
is perfectly white and stiff. Test it, and if the candy 
does not stick to the hands, it is done. Flavor to 
taste. Bun the candy through a funnel into starch 
prints (made for the purpose). Sift a little starch 
over the top and set it away to harden. Keep them 
in air-tight tin boxes. You can get the gum arable, 
starch, and prints ready prepared. 



Mint Drops. 

2 cups of granulated suojar, 

^ cup of water. 
Boil until mixture feathers, take from stove, drop 8 
drops of oil of peppermint into it, stir until white, 
and drop on marble or on back of a cold, smooth 
surface. Alice L. King. 

Mont Eagle, Tenn. 



CANDIES. 267 



CocoANUT Drops. 

I pound of grated cocoanut, 

J pound of sugar sifted, 

Whites of 3 eggs. 
Beat the eggs stiff, add the sugar, then the cocoa- 
nut, and beat all well together. Drop it on buttered 
paper on tins and bake in a moderate oven. 

Crystallized Fruits. 
Make a sirup of 1 pound of sugar and 1 pint of 
water boiled until it will harden when a little is 
dropped in cold water. Take it from the j&re and dip 
the fruit into the liot sirup, plac3 the fruit on a sieve 
to drain ; this will save a waste of sirup. When cool 
the sugar will crystallize. You can dip the fruit the 
second time if you think it needs it. Or beat whites 
of eggs to a stiff froth and lay the fruit in the beaten 
egg, with the stems upward. Drain the dish, so the 
egg can be beaten again and used. Take out the 
fruits by their stems, dip them in sifted powdered 
sugar and place them on paraffin paper in a cool 
place to dry. If you use fruit without stems, handle 
it with a hat pin in dipping and removing from the 
sirup. 

Peach Leather. 

To 1 pound of fruit allow J pound of sugar. Mash 
the fruit as it cooks, and when it is cooked enough 
spread it on a flat tin greased with butter and set it 
in the sun to dry. It can be rolled up in a cloth, and 
will keep perfectly the year round. Apple or quince 
leather may be prepared in the same way, adding a 
little spice or flavoring. 



268 TENNESSEE MODEL SOVSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Homemade Maple Sirup. 
Make a strong tea of hickory bark by pouring 
water over it and let stand overnight. Next morn- 
ing boil until you have a strong tea, then strain 
through a cloth. To 1 gallon of tea add 8 pounds of 
brown sugar and cook until it forms a thick sirup. 
It reduces about one-half. Mrs. eT. H. Fullton. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



DIET FOR THE SICK. 

DISHES for invalids should be served in the 
daintiest and most attractive way. A fastidi- 
ous convalescent may be deluded into taking more 
nourishment than he knows of or is willing to take 
by having the well-beaten yolk of an egg stirred in 
his morning cup of coffee. 

Beef Tea. 
Cut into small pieces 1 pound or more of lean beef, 
put it into a glass fruit jar without a drop of water, 
cover it tightly, and set it in a pot of cold water. 
Let come to a boil slowly, boil three or four hours, 
until meat is white and all juice is drawn out. 
Strain off the juice and season it with salt to suit 
taste of the patient. 

Beefsteak. 
Choose the tenderest cuts, and broil it over a hot 
fire very carefully. Let the steak be rare, salt and 
pepper it, lay it between two hot plates for three or 
four minutes, and serve it. If the patient is very 
weak, do not let him swallow anything except the 
juice, after chewing the meat well. The juice of 
beef cooked in this way is very strengthening. 

Batter Cakes. 

Sift together 2 cups of flour, J teaspoonful of soda. 
a little salt, make into a stiff batter with buttermilk, 
and bake immediately. 

(-269) 



270 TENNIJSiSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE . 

Broth. 
Boil 1 pound of chicken, mutton, or veal in 3 pints 
of water 3 hours; strain it, let it get cold, and skim 
off all fat that rises to the top. When ready for use 
warm the liquor and put in a little salt. Rice that 
has been boiled may be added to it. 

Gruel. 
Take 2 pints of water, put it on the fire in a sauce- 
pan ; when it boils sprinkle in cornmeal until it looks 
milky. Let it cook one hour. When it is done it 
should be as thick as buttermilk. Salt to suit taste 

of invalid. 

Panada. 

Split 6 crackers, pile them in a bowl in layers, 
and sprinkle them with 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, a 
pinch of salt, and a little nutmeg; cover with boil- 
ing water, put a close top over the bowl, and let 
stand one hour. Eat from the bowl, with more su- 
gar sprinkled over it if you like. Toast slices of 
bread nicely and use instead of crackers if desired. 
Can use sweet milk instead of water to pour over 
the crackers or bread. 

Dry Toast. 
Cut off the crust from stale light bread (white or 
Graham), slice J inch thick, and toast quickly. But- 
ter it lightly if the patient can have butter, or spread 
with butter before toasting and set it in stove to get 
good hot, and serve. 

Milk Toast. 

Cut a thin slice of stale bread, toast it nicely, and 
pour upon it 3 tablespoonfuls of boiling milk or 



DIET FOR THE SICK. 271 

cream. Use a little butter in the milk if patient is 
allowed to have it. Also break an egg boiled half 
done on top of the toast, sprinkle it with a little salt 
and pepper, and serve hot. 

Wafers. 

Sift flour and mix it to a stiff dough with sweet 
milk and a pinch of salt. Roll it oat thin and cut it 
into round cakes; roll these again until very thin. 
Bake quickly. These are simple, and are nice served 
with any kind of broth or soup. 

Boiled Rice. 

Boil 4 cup of rice in enough water to cover it until 
done, add 1 cup of sweet milk, let simmer, stir it 
well to keep it from scorching. Stir in a little salt 
and 1 egg beaten light, sweeten to taste. When 
done serve warm with cream and nutmeg. 

Cup Pudding. 
Take 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1 egg well beaten, 
and mix with cold sweet milk to a batter, add a bit 
of salt, put it into a buttered cup, and set it in a pan 
of boiling water, set it in the oven and cook fifteen or 
twenty minutes. Serve with sauce, fruit, or cream 
and sugar. 

Lime Water. 

Pour 2 quarts of hot water over fresh unslacked 
lime (size of a walnut), stir it till slacked, let stand 
till clear, and bottle. Often ordered with milk to 
neutralize acidity of the stomach. 



272 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Jelly Watek. 

1 teaspoonful of jelly, 

1 goblet of water, 

Beat up well together. 
This is a nice drink for a fever patient. Use any 
kind of jelly, such as currant, cranberry, blackberry, 
or wild cherry. 

EiOE Water. 
Soak J cup of rice in a little warm water one hour 
or more, then put it in 3 pints of cold water, add a 
pinch of salt, let boil slowly imtil the water has re- 
duced one half, or it is a smooth paste. Strain it 
through a thin coarse muslin cloth, serve it plain, or 
sweeten it to taste, give a few spoonfuls every hour, 
or oftener if desired. This is especially good for 
children. 

Slippery Elm Bark Tea. 
Break the bark into small pieces, pour boiling 
water over it, cover it, and let stand until cold. Add 
lemon juice, sweeten, and take for a cold; or add ice, 
and take for summer disorders. 

JFlaxseed Lemonade. 

Pour 1 quart of boiling water over 4 tablespoon - 
fuls of whole flaxseed and let steep three hours in a 
covered pitcher; add juice of 2 lemons, sweeten to 
taste, and, if too thick, add cold water. Ice, and 
drink. 

Dried Flour. 

Tie 1 cup of flour in a stout cloth, put it in cold 
water, and set it on the stove, let boil five or six 
hours. Take the ball out of the cloth, apd dry it in 



DIET FOR THE SICK. 273 

the hot sun or a moderate oven with the door open. 
Grate the quantity desired and mix it with a little 
cold water, and use it to thicken milk, boil it five 
minutes, add a little salt. This is especially good 
for children. 

Blackberry Cordial. 
Boil ripe berries until they break, strain them in a 
bag, squeezing out all the juice. To 1 quart of juice 
allow ^ pound of white sugar and 1 ounce each of 
ground cinnamon, allspice, cloves, and grated nut- 
meg; tie the spices in a muslin cloth. Boil juice, 
sugar, and spices together fifteen or twenty minutes, 
skimming well. Bottle hot and air tight. Excellent 
for summer complaint, and can be taken by delicate 
invalids. 
18 



Health Rules and Remedies. 

As soon as you are tip shake blanket and sheet; 

Better be without shoes than to sit with wet feet. 

Children, if healthy, are active, not still; 

Damp bed and damp clothes will both make you ill. 

]^at slowly, and always chew your food well; 

F'reshen the air in the house where you dwell. 

Garments must never be made too tight; 

Homes should be healthy, airy, and light. 

If you wish to do well, as you do, I've no doubt, 

Just open the window before you go out. 

Keep the rooms always tidy and clean; 

I/et dust on the furniture never be seen. 

Much illness is caused by the want of fresh air; 

Now to open the windows be ever your care. 

Old rags and old rubbish should never be kept; 

People should see that their floors are well swept. 

Quick movements in children are healthy and right; 

Remember the young cannot thrive without light. 

See that the cistern is full to the brim; 

Take care that your dress is all tidy and clean. 

Use your nose to find if there be a bad drain; 

Very sad are the favors that come in its train. 

Walk as much as you can without feeling fatigue; 

Xerxes could walk full many a league. 

Your health is your wealth which your wisdom must 

keep; 
2Jeal will help a good cause, and the good you will 

reap. 
(274) 



HEALTH RULES AND REMEDIES. 275 



Rules. 

Health, like success in life, is to be gained by 
paying attention to details. It is better to try to 
keep from catching cold than to be always trying 
to avoid infection. More can be done to check chol- 
era by keeping houses clean than by using tons of 
disinfectants. Nature gives health. It is man's per- 
versity in departing from Nature's teaching which 
leads to disease. Nature intended all to have fresh 
air, sufficient plain food, pure water, and exercise. 
Let us accept Nature's bequest, if we prefer health 
to disease. 

Do not sit or sleep in a draught. 

Do not cool off too quickly after exercising. 

Do not sit in a damp, chilly room without a fire. 

Do not go to bed with cold feet. 

Do not sit with damp feet. 

Do not approach contagious diseases with an 
empty stomach. 

One of the simplest ways of relieving pain is by 
use of hot water, externally and internally, temper- 
ature suiting feelings of patient. The remedy is 
simple and harmless, and should be more generally 

used. 

There is many a house of grandeur, 

With turret, tower, and dome, 
That knows not peace or comfort, 

And does not prove a home. 
I do not ask for splendor 

To crown my daily lot. 
But this I ask: a kitchen 

Where the kettle is always hot. 

Dyspepsia. 
Drink a cup of hot water before meals. 



276 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Tickling in Throat. 
Gargle hot salt water. 

Pains in Stomach. 
Take soda aiid giiiger iii hot water. 

Bruises. 
Bathe with hot water. 

Sick Headache. 
Take a little soda water; or half the juice of a 
leraon in a cup of strong black coffee, without sugar. 

Sick Stomach. 
Take 1 drop of ipecac in a little water. 

Night Sweats 
Sponge with salt water. 

A Cold. 
Drink strong, hot lemonade. 

Sorb Throat. 
Gargle with alcohol and glycerin in hot water. 

Toothache. 
Cotton wet with ammonia and applied to tooth. 

Stings of Insects. 
Bathe with soda or ammonia. 

Burns. 
Use white of ^gg, soda, or sweet oil; or one-third 
part linseed oil, two-thirds lime water, shake it up 
well, apply, and wrap burned part in soft linen. 

Hoarseness. 
Take a few drops of camphor in honey, or a small 
bit of borax dissolved slowly in the mouth. 



HEALTH RULES AND REMEDIES. 277 

Ringworms. 
Bathe with a strong solution of borax. 

Hiccough. 
Eat a lump of sugar dipped in vinegar. 

Croup. 
Keep a box of powdered alum and twice as much 
sugar mixed; give it in small doses until relieved. 

Sprained Ankle. 
Use a plaster made of white of egg and powdered 

alum. 

Flux. 

When threatened with it take 1 heaped tea spoon- 
ful of Epsom salts with 6 drops of laudanum in one- 
third glass of water every hour until relieved. 

Whooping Cough. 

1 ounce of gum arable, 

1 ounce of rock candy, 

1 ounce of licorice. 
Add 1 quart of boiling water to these and boil down 
to 1 pint; strain it and add 1 ounce of paregoric and 
1 ounce of wine of antimony. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. AnNIE JonES. 

Hemorrhages. 
For hemorrhages of lungs or stomach take small 
doses of salt. The patient should be kept as quiet 
as possible. 

Bleeding Cuts. 

Use powdered resin, or bind the cut with cobwebs 
and sugar, pressed on like lint. 



278 tenn£ss:ei: model household guide. 

Pains in the Side. 
Apply a mustard plaster. 

Earache. 

Use 2 or 3 drops of laudanum and sweet oil, or 
glycerin and alcohol, equal parts, or mullein oil, 
heated in a spoon and poured into the ear; stop the 
ear with cotton. 

Dysentery. 

Take egg beaten with or without sugar. 

Inflammatory Troubles. 
Use cranberry poultices. 

Ivy Poison. 
Bathe in a solution of sulphate of soda, sulphur 
and cream, or spirits of niter. 

Broken Limbs. 
Broken limbs should be placed in a natural posi- 
tion and the patient kept quiet until the surgeon ar- 
rives. 

Fever. 

A domestic remedy is a teaspoonful of spirits of 
niter in a glass of water. Drink a little at a time. 
It increases action of the kidneys. Bathe the pa- 
tient frequently in soda water. 

Cold Sores. 
For cold sores or fever blisters bathe the lips with 
spirits of niter. 

Severed Artery. 
Tie a stout cord or handkerchief above it. 
In Sewing 
Change your position often, and it will rest you. 



BEALTH RULES AND REMEDIES. 279 

Antidote for Poison. 
Mix 2 teaspoonfuls of mustard in a glass of warm 
water and drink it immediately. 

Before Going to a Dentist. 
Do not eat acids, such as pickles, fruits, tomatoes, 
etc., for several days before having the teeth worked 
on, and they will not be near so sensitive or painful. 

Face Wash. 
To cleanse the skin: Beat whites of 3 eggs in a 
bowl until very stiff; pour slowly into this, beating 
all the time, 1 tumbler of best alcohol, 2 tumblers of 
cold water, juice of 3 lemons strained, a pinch of 
pulverized saltpeter; bottle and cork tightly. Shake 
it well before using; moisten a soft cloth with the 
mixture, and wipe the face with it. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. H. FULLTON. 

Oatmeal Wash for Face. 
To soften the skin : Beat in a mortar or a cloth A 
cup of oatmeal; mix with 2J cups of w^ater and let 
stand overnight. Next morning pour off the w^ater 
and coarser meal; the residue is then strained 
through a coarse muslin and squeezed ; add bay rum 
to make as thick as cream. Alcohol can be used in- 
stead of bay rum. Bottle, and apply with a soft 
cloth. Let dry on the face. Mrs. J. H. Fiillton. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



USEFUL AND SUGGESTIVE. 

IT is a good idea to have a deep, suitable vessel (one 
that can be well covered) for boiling lard for fry- 
ing purposes, as you can fry anything you wish in the 
same lard by boiling slices of raw Irish potatoes in 
it to cleanse it : The impurities will rise to the top, 
and can be skimmed off. Have an open wire basket 
sieve (made for the purpose) with a handle to it, so 
that you can place in it the material you wish to fry, 
and place it in the kettle of boiling lard until done; 
then you can easily remove all at once. Now and 
then drain off the lard from sediment in bottom of 
vessel or strain it; clean the vessel nicely, pour the 
lard back into it, cover, and set it away until wanted 
again. I heard a lady say that the potatoes would 
even remove all taste and odor of fish from the lard. 

Soap. 
Save all grease not used for gravies, such as pot 
skimmings, fat pieces not wanted, skins of bacon, 
etc. Boil it in water, set it aside to cool, skim the 
fat off, and put it away until you have a quantity. 
Then get either Lewis's or Thompson's Red Seal 
concentrated lye and make soap without boiling it, 
according to the directions on the boxes of lye, and 
you will have nice, firm soap for kitchen and laun- 
dry purposes. 

Ammonia. 

Ammonia can often be used instead of soap, as it 
cleans everything it touches. 
(280) 



USEFUL AND SUGGESTIVE. 28l 

Borax. 
A few spoonfuls of solution of borax added to 
dishwater is much better than soap. 

Clean Pans and Kettles. 
If jou will clean pans and kettles immediately 
after using them, it will not involve half the labor. 

Clean Copper Ware. 
Never throw pieces of lemon away; save them to 
clean copper kettles and stewpans, or use vinegar 

and salt. 

Clean Bottles. 

Use hot water and cinders; or shot and water, if 
the bottles have small mouths. 

Remove Stains from Hands. 
Wash the hands in borax water, lemon juice, or 
tartaric acid water. 

Remedy Scorched Food. 
Put 1 or 2 clean charcoals into it and stir it a few 
minutes, and it will remove the burnt taste. 

Nashville, Tenn. MrS. J. H. FULLTON. 

Settle Coffee. 
Eggshells will settle coffee as surely as eggs, but 
will not impart the same flavor. 

Remove Tops of Fruit Jars That Cannot be 
Started by Hand. 

Dip a cloth in very hot water, apply it to the out- 
side of cap, and it will cause it to expand. 'Never al- 
low opened fruit, meat, or vegetables to stand in tin 
cans. 



282 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 

Remove Odor of Onions erom the Hands. 
Burn a roll of paper and hold the hands over it in 
the smoke, or wash the hands in mustard water. 

Clean New Kettles. 

Fill them with Irish potato peelings and let boil 

one hour; then wash the kettle with hot water, wipe 

it dry, and grease it with a little lard. Or boil hay 

in the kettle. 

Clear Mica in Stoves. 

Wash it with strong vinegar water, or wet it with 
vinegar and let it stand awhile, then wash it. 

Drive Away Red Ants. 
Put a small quantity of green sage in the pantry 
or sprinkle powdered borax in the corners of the 
shelves. 

Remove Paint from Window Glass. 
Wash it with strong, hot vinegar. It will also re- 
move mortar. 

Remove Tar. 

Rub it with lard and wash with soap and water. 
Apply to either clothing or hands. 

Clean Marble. 
Use soda and soap, or ammonia, or unslacked lime 
and strong lye. 

Soften Hard Water. 
Use a little borax, a few drops of ammonia, or a 
pinch of soda. 

Disinfectant for Kitchen Sink. 
Two tablespoonfuls of soda in a gallon of hot 
water. Pour it in at night. 



USEFUL AND SUGGESTIVE. 283 

Remove Iron Rust. 
Lemon juice and salt will remove ordinary iron 

rust. 

Clean Straw Hats. 

Wash them well with soap and water with a 
brush, then rub them with lemon juice until white. 

Remove White Spots on Furniture. 
Heat a plate and hold it over the white spots on 
varnished furniture; or apply alcohol with a sponge. 

Whiten Stone Hearths or Steps. 
Sifted wood ashes wet and rubbed on and allowed 
to dry. 

Improve Soiled Willow Chairs or Baskets. 

Give them an application of some of the pretty 
ready-mixed stains, such as rosewood, and finish 
with a coat of shellac varnish. 

Purify Cistern Water. 
Put charcoal in a bag and hang it in the water. 

Keep Meat Sweet. 
Put a small dish of charcoal in the meat larder. 

Clean Knives. 
If steel knives, rub them with newly cut Irish 
potato and salt. It will remove rust. 

Clean Rusty Flatirons. 
Rub them with beeswax and salt; or grease them 
with a piece of sperm candle and rub them on paper. 



284 TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 

Make Starch. 
Use soapy water. It prevents it from sticking. 

Hot Air Passages in Stoves. 
Hot air passages in stoves or ranges should be 
kept free from soot, or it will seriously interfere 
witli heating the oven. 

Clean Refrigerators. 
Wash them with cold water and soda once or 
twice a week in warm w^eather. 

Clean Chamber Vessels. 
Pails and all vessels used in chambers should be 
rinsed thoroughly in cold water; never in hot or 
warm water. 

Freshen Feather Beds and Pillows. 

Leave them out in a drenching rain every spring, 

and then expose them to the sun and air until per- 

fecthj dry. 

Wash Blankets. 

Add J cup each of ammonia and alcohol mixed to 

a suds with Castile soap to every 2 gallons of water; 

sop the blankets up and down in it, rinse them in 

tepid water, shake them well, and hang them up to 

dry. 

Whiten Garments. 

If they have become yellow from lying away, rinse 
them in water with a little borax in it. 

Clean Piano Keys. 
Use a soft rag dipped in alcohol. 

Remove Egg Stains from Silver. 
Rub it with a wet rag and salt. 



USEFUL AND SUGGESTIVE. 285 

Clean Windows in Cold Weather. 
Use a rag wet with alcohol, as it never freezes. 

Drive Vermin Away. 
Mix copperas with whitewash on the cellar walls. 

Set Color in Wash Goods. 
Put 1 tablespoonful of sugar of lead into 1 pailful 
of water, soak the article in it fifteen or twenty min- 
utes before washing it. 

Bedbug Poison. 
One ounce of corrosive sublimate, 4 ounces of spir- 
its of turpentine, twelve ounces of alcohol ; mix and 
apply with a brush. Quicksilver beaten with white 
of an egg and applied with a brush is also a good 
bedbug poison. 

Clean Carpets. 
Dust thoroughly, then tack down and scrub over 
with a scrubbing brush and warm water, to 1 buck- 
etful of which put 1 dessert-spoonful of soda, 1 wine- 
glassful of ammonia, 1 wineglassf ul of alcohol. Use 
one-half of the water and keep the other to use as 
soon as the first becomes too soiled. Wipe it dry 
with cloths. Mrs. H. E. Jackson. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Clean Silver. 
Wash it well in strong, warm soapsuds, rinse and 
wipe it dry with a soft cloth. Then mix hartshorn 
powder into a thick paste with cold water; spread 
this over the silver with a soft cloth and let it dry. 
When dry rub it off clean with a clean soft cloth. 



286 t£nn^sse:bj model ho usehold q vide. 

Clean Jewelry. 
Rub a little soap on a soft brush and brush the 
jewelry with a mixture of ammonia and water; 
rinse it in cold water and dry it in an old handker- 
chief. Then rub it with chamois skin. 

Soften Shoes. 

To soften shoes that have been hardened by water 
rub them with kerosene oil. 



INDEX. 



SOUPS. 



Suggestions 9 

Bean Soup 13 

Beef Soup 10 

Bouillon 10 

Browned Flour 10 

Celery Soup 14 

Chicken Soup 12 

Coloring for Soups 9 

Corn and Tomato Soup .... 13 
Croutons for Soup 10 



PAOB 

. 14 



Green Pea Soup 

Gumbo Soup (No. 1) 11 

Gumbo Soup (No. 2) 11 

Noodles for Soup 10 

Noodle Soup 14 

Oyster Soup 12 

Potato Soup 13 

Tomato Soup (No. 1) 12 

Tomato Soup (No. 2) 12 

Veal Soup 11 



FISH. 



Suggestions 15 

Baked Fish 16 

Boiled Fish (No. 1) 15 

Boiled Fish (No. 2.) 16 

Broiled Fish 17 

Fish Balls 18 

Fish Fritters 18 



Fish Omelet . . . , 18 

Fried Fish 17 

Salmon Bake 19 

Salmon Loaf 19 

Sauce for Fish 15 

Steamed Fish 16 

Stuffing for Fish 15 



OYSTERS. 



Suggestions 20 

Broiled Oysters 22 

Creamed Oysters (No. 1) . . . 23 
Creamed Oysters (No. 2) . . . 24 

Fried Oysters 20 

Oyster Bake 24 

Oyster Fritters 21 



Oyster Pie 23 

Oyster Eagout 23 

Panned Oysters 22 

Scalloped Oysters 22 

Steamed Oysters 21 

Stewed Oysters 20 



MEATS. 



Suggestions 25 

Baked Ham 34 

Baked Hash 29 



Barbecue 40 

Beef Hash 29 

Beef Loaf 30 

(287) 



288 



TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



Beef Tongue 30 

Beefsteak and Onions 28 

Boiled Chicken 38 

Boiled Ham 34 

Boiled Turkey 36 

Brains 33 

Broiled Beefsteak 27 

Broiled Chicken 38 

Broiled Ham (No. 1) 35 

Broiled Ham (No. 2) 35 

Browned Butter 26 

Browned Flour for Gravies . 25 

Chicken Pie 39 

Corned Beef 26 

Dressed Ham 34 

Dressed Steak 29 

Dressing for Fowls .... 35 

Dumpling for Stews 39 

Fried Chicken 38 

Fried Ham 35 

Fried Liver 31 

Fried Mutton Chops 31 

Fried Steak 28 

Fried Steak and Onions ... 28 
Fried Steak and Tomatoes . 29 

Fried Tripe 32 

Game 42 

HotTamales 30 



Jellied Chicken 40 

Kidney Stew 40 

Meat Roll 41 

Meat Scallop 42 

Pecaloming (Spanish Dish) 41 

Pigs' Feet 33 

Pork Chops 32 

Pork Steak 32 

Roast Beef 27 

Roast Chicken 38 

Roast Mutton 31 

Roast Pork 32 

Roast Sparerib 32 

Roast Turkey ..: 36 

Roast Veal 31 

Sausage 33 

Scotch Stew 41 

Smothered Chicken 40 

Smothered Steak 28 

Spiced Round 26 

Steamed Ham 34 

Stewed Chicken 39 

Stewed Tripe 32 

Turkey Hash 37 

Turkey Scallop 37 

Turkey Steak 37 

Veal Cutlets 31 



SAUCES AND CATSUPS. 



Suggestions 43 

Apple Sauce 45 

Caper Sauce 45 

Celery Sauce 44 

Celery Vinegar 48 

Chili Sauce (No. 1) 46 

Chili Sauce (No. 2) 47 

Chili Sauce (No. 3) 47 

Chili Sauce (No. 4) 47 

Cranberry Sauce 45 



Cucumber Catsup 49 

Drawn Butter 43 

Egg Sauce 44 

Gooseberry Catsup 49 

Green Tomato Catsup 49 

Horse-radish Sauce 48 

Made Mustard (No. 1) 47 

Made Mustard (No. 2) 47 

Mint Sauce 45 

Onion Sauce 44 



INDEX. 



289 



Onion Vinegar 48 

Oyster Sauce 44 

Plum Catsup 49 

Sauce for Salmon Loaf. 46 



Tomato Catsup 48 

Tomato Jelly 46 

Tomato Sauce (No. 1) 44 

Tomato Sauce (No. 2) 44 



PICKLES. 



Suggestions 50 

Cabbage Pickle 56 

Chopped Pickle 54 

Chowchow (No. 1) 52 

Chowchow (No. 2) 53 

Chowchow (No. 3) 53 

Citron Pickle 58 

Cucumber Pickle 50 

Hay den Salad 54 

Mixed Mustard Pickle 52 

Mixed Pickle 51 

Pickled Peaches (No. 1) 59 

Pickled Peaches (No. 2). . . . 59 



Pickled Watermelon Rind. 57 

Raisin Sweet Pickle 58 

Sliced Pickle 56 

Splendid Pickle 51 

Sweet Pickle for Fruit 58 

Sweet Peach Pickle (No. 1) 59 
Sweet Peach Pickle (No. 2) 60 

Sweet Tomato Pickle 57 

Table Vinegar 50 

Tomato Pickle 56 

Vinegar Peaches 60 

Yellow Pickle (No. 1) 54 

Yellow Pickle (No. 2) 55 



SALADS. 



Suggestions 61 

Cabbage Salad 66 

Celery Salad 66 

Chicken Salad 62 

Cold Slaw 67 

Mayonnaise Dressing (No. 1) 61 
Mayonnaise Dressing (No. 2) 61 

Oyster Salad (No. 1) 63 

Oyster Salad (No. 2) 63 

Oyster Salad (No. 3) 64 

Oyster Salad (No. 4) 64 

Potato Salad (No. 1)........ 65 



Potato Salad (No. 2) 65 

Potato Salad (No. 3) 65 

Potato Salad (No. 4) 65 

Salad Dressing (No. 1) 62 

Salad Dressing (No. 2) 62 

Salmon Salad 64 

Sardine Salad 64 

Slaw and Dressing 67 

Tomato Jelly Salad ........ 66 

Tomato Salad 66 

Vegetable Salad m 



Suggestions 68 

Asparagus 78 

Baked Corn 79 

Baked Rice 83 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 73 

19 



VEGETABLES. 

Baked Tomatoes 81 

Beets 76 

Boiled Cabbage 68 

Boiled Corn 7^ 

Boiled Irish Potatoes 70 



290 



TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



Broiled Tomatoes (No. 1).. . 81 
Broiled Tomatoes (No. 2)... 82 

Butter Beans 74 

Carrots 77 

Celery 85 

Corn and Tomatoes 79 

Corn Fritters 79 

Creamed Irish Potatoes 71 

Corn Oysters 79 

Corn Pudding 80 

Cucumbers 80 

Dried Beans 74 

Egg Plant 77 

Flaked Irish Potatoes 71 

Fried Apples 85 

Fried Cabbage 69 

Fried Corn 79 

Fried Cucumbers 80 

Fried Peaches 85 

Green Pease 77 

Hominy 84 

Irish Potato Cakes 72 

Irish Potatoes with Roast. . 71 

Lye Hominy 84 

Macaroni (No. 1) 83 

Macaroni (No. 2) 84 

Mashed Irish Potatoes 70 

Mashed Turnips 75 

Okra(No.l) 82 



Okra(No.2) 82 

Onions 82 

Parsnip Fritters 76 

Parsnips 76 

Eice 83 

Salsify 78 

Saratoga Chips 72 

Sauerkraut 69 

Scalloped Irish Potatoes 72 

Spaghetti 78 

Squashes 77 

Steamed Cabbage 69 

Stewed Irish Potatoes 71 

Stewed Pumpkin 75 

Stev/ed Tomatoes 80 

String Beans 74 

Stuffed Cabbage 70 

Stuffed Irish Potatoes (No. 

1) 72 

Stuffed Irish Potatoes (No. 

2) 72 

Stuffed Tomatoes (No. 1) . . . 81 
Stuffed Tomatoes (No. 2) . . . 81 

Sweet Potatoes 73 

Sweet Potato Pudding (No. 

1) 73 

Sweet Potato Pudding (No. 

2) 74 

Turnip Greens 75 



EGGS. 



Suggestions , 86 

An Egg Scramble 87 

Boiled Eggs (No. 1) 86 

Boiled Eggs (No. 2) 86 

Delightful Eggs 90 

Egg Omelet (No. 1) 90 

Egg Omelet (No. 2) 90 

Fried Eggs 88 

Mixed Omelets 89 



Omelet 89 

Poached Eggs 87 

Proached Eggs 88 

Scalloped Eggs 88 

Scrambled Eggs 87 

Shirred Eggs 88 

Stuffed Eggs 90 

To Preserve Eggs 86 

Vermicelli 91 



INDEX. 



291 



MII.K, BUTTER, AND CHEESE. 



PAGE 

Suggestions 92 

Cheese Biscuit 94 

Cheese Fingers 93 

Cheese Fondu 94 

Cheese Scallop 94 

Cheese Straws (No. 1) 93 



Cheese Straws (No. 2) 93 

Cheese Straws (No. 3) 94 

Clabber 92 

Cottage Cheese 92 

To Preserve Butter 92 



BREADS. 



Suggestions 95 

Apple Bread 116 

Aunt Dinah's Ashcake 116 

Baking Powder Biscuit 108 

Baking Powder Rusk 106 

Beaten Biscuit (No. 1) 109 

Beaten Biscuit (No. 2) 109 

Biscuit 107 

Boston Brown Bread (No.l) 112 
Boston Brown Bread No. 2) 112 

Bread Crumbs 96 

Buttermilk Bread 99 

Centennial Biscuit 108 

Corn Bread 115 

Corn Light Bread (No. 1). 113 
Corn Light Bread (No. 2).. 113 
Corn Light Bread (No. 3).. 114 

Crackling Bread 117 

Cream Muffins 110 

Currant Bread 100 

Egg Bread 114 

Fine Egg Bread 115 

Fine Muffins 110 

French Rolls 103 

Fried Mush 118 

Good Corn Bread 115 

Graham Biscuit 108 

Graham Bread 100 



Graham Gems (No. 1) Ill 

Graham Gems (No. 2) 112 

Hoecake 115 

Johnny Cake 114 

Lemon Crackers 110 

Light Rolls 104 

Milk Bread 99 

Moisten Loaf Bread 95 

Muffins 115 

Mush 117 

Mush Bread (No. 1) 117 

Mush Bread (No. 2) 117 

Oat Flakes 118 

Oatmeal lis 

Parker House Rolls (Un- 

fermented) 105 

Plain Muffins Ill 

Pone Corn Bread (No. 1). , 116 
Pone Corn Bread (No. 2) . . 116 

Popovers Ill 

Potato Yeast 97 

Pulled Soda Biscuit 107 

Pumpkin Bread 116 

Rolls 103 

Rusk (No. 1) 105 

Rusk (No. 2) 106 

Sally Lunn 106 

Salt Rising Bread (No. 1). . 100 



292 



TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 



Salt Rising Bread (No. 2) . . 101 
Salt Rising Bread (No. 3). . 102 
Salt Rising Bread (No. 4). . 102 

Self-rising Yeast 96 

Soda Biscuit 107 

Sweet Potato Biscuit (No. 1) 108 
Sweet Potato Biscuit (No. 2) 109 

Swiss Lips 104 

Table for Cooking Bread . . 95 



Tea Rolls 105 

To Freshen Stale Bread. ... 96 

To Utilize Stale Bread 96 

Wafers (No. 1) 109 

AVafers (No. 2) 110 

White Bread 98 

Yeast and Bread 98 

Yeast Cakes (No. 1) 97 

Yeast Cakes (No. 2) 98 



BATTER CAKES, WAFFEES, AND TOASTS. 



Suggestions 119 

Biscuit Batter Cakes 122 

Bread Crumb Batter Cakes. 122 

Buckwheat Cakes 121 

Cheese Toast 124 

Corn Meal Batter Cakes 

(No. 1) 123 

Corn Meal Batter Cakes 

(No. 2) 123 

Egg Toast 124 

Famous "Beckwith" Bat- 
ter Cakes 122 

Graham Flour Batter Cakes 122 



Light Waffles 120 

Milk Toast 124 

Mush Batter Cakes 123 

Oyster Toast 124 

Raised Buckwheat Cakes. . 121 

Rice Waffles 120 

Sour Milk Batter Cakes ... 121 
Sweet Milk Batter Cakes.. 121 

Toast 123 

Waffles (No. 1) 119 

Waffles (No. 2) 120 

Waffles (No. 3) 120 



CROQUETTES, PATTIES, AND SANDWICHES. 



Suggestions 125 

Cheese Sandwiches 131 

Chicken Croquettes (No. 1) 125 

Chicken Croquettes (No. 2) 126 

Chicken Croquettes (No. 3.) 126 

Chicken Patties (No. 1).... 129 

Chicken Patties (No. 2).... 129 

Coquille 128 

Fish Croquettes (No. 1).. . . 127 
Fish Croquettes (No. 2). .. . 127 
Ham and Chicken Sand- 
wiches 130 



Ham Patties 130 

Ham Sandwiches 130 

Meat Croquettes 128 

Oyster Croquettes 127 

Oyster Patties 130 

Potato Croquettes 128 

Salmon Croquettes 128 

Salmon Sandwiches 131 

Sardine Sandwiches 131 

To Fry Croquettes 125 

To Utilize Cold Meats 129 

VealPatties 129 



INDEX. 



293 



PASTRY 

PAGE 

Suggestions 132 

Apple Custard Pies 136 

Berry Pies 138 

Buttermilk Custards (No.l) 142 

Buttermilk Custards (No.2) 142 

Caramel Custards 146 

Cherry Pies 138 

Chess Pie 142 

Chocolate Pie 143 

Cocoanut Chess Pie 142 

Cocoanut Cream Pie 141 

Cocoanut Custards 141 

Cocoanut Pie 141 

Cranberry Tarts 138 

Cream Custards 141 

Dried Apple or Peach Pies 138 

Fruit Turnovers 137 

Gooseberry Tarts 138 

Grape Pies 138 

Green Apple Pies 136 

Green Tomato Pie 139 

Irish Potato Custards 140 

Jam Pie 143 

Jelly Custards (No. 1.) 144 

Jelly Custards (No. 2.) . . . . 144 

Jelly Custards (No. 3) 144 

Lemon Custards (No. 1.) . . . 145 

Lemon Custards (No. 2). . . 145 



AND PIES. 

Lemon Custards (No. 3). . 
Lemon Custards (No. 4). . 
Lemon Custards (Not 5).. 
Mince-meat Pies (No. 1).. , 
Mince-meat Pies (No. 2).. . 

Mock Apple Pies 

Mock Mince Pies , 

Molasses Custards (No. 1) . 
Molasses Custards (No. 2) . 
Molasses Custards (No. 3), 

Pastry (No. 1) - 

Pastry (No. 2) , 

Peach Cobbler , 

Peach Meringue Pies . 

Peach Pie 

Preserve Pie 

Preserve Puffs 

Puff Paste 

Pumpkin Custards 

Raisin Pie 

Rhubarb Pies , 

Sliced Apple Pie , 

Sugar Pie 

Sweet Potato Custards 

Sweet Potato Pie 

Tartlets or Fruit Patties . . . 
To Ice Pastry 



145 
146 
146 
134 
134 
136 
135 
1-if) 
147 
147 
132 
133 
137 
137 
136 
143 
144 
133 
140 
135 
139 
135 
143 
140 
140 
139 
134 



PUDDINGS, ROLLS, AND -DUMPLINGS. 

Dumplings 



Suggestions 148 

Apple Dumplings 165 

Banana Pudding 163 

Berry Dumplings 165 

Black Pudding 155 

Boiled Apple Dumplings 

(No.l) 166 



Boiled Apple 

(No.2) 166 

Bread Pudding 153 

Chocolate Pudding (No. 1) 152 
Chocolate Pudding (No. 2) 153 
Cocoanut Pudding (No. 1) 152 
Cocoanut Pudding (No. 2) 152 



294 



TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



Cocoanut Sponge Roll 164 

Cottage Pudding 156 

Cranberry Pudding) 162 

Dandy Pudding 149 

English Pudding 155 

Fig Pudding 157 

Fig Roll 164 

Fruit Pudding 156 

Fruit Rolls 164 

Fruit Suet Dumplings 167 

Ginger Pudding (No. 1) . . . 160 

Ginger Pudding (No. 2). . . 160 

Jam Pudding (No. 1) 154 

Jam Pudding (No. 2) 154 

Macaroon Pudding 150 

New York Pudding 150 

One-egg Cake Pudding. . . . 154 

Orange Pudding 162 

Pastry for Rolls or Dump- 
lings 148 

Peach Cottage Pudding 155 



Peach Padding (No. 1) . . . . 161 
Peach Pudding (No. 2). . . . 161 

Plum Pudding (No. 1) 158 

Plum Pudding (No. 2) . . . . 158 

Plum Pudding (No. 3) 359 

Prune Pudding (No. 1) . . . . 161 
Prune Pudding (No. 2) . . . . 162 

Queen Pudding 151 

Rice Pudding 151 

Snow Dumplings 165 

Snow Pudding 149 

Sponge Roll (No. 1) 163 

Sponge Roll (No. 2) 163 

Steamed Fruit Pudding 

(No. 1) 156 

Steamed Fruit Pudding 

(No. 2) o.... 157 

Suet Dumplings 166 

Suet Pudding 157 

Velvet Pudding 148 

Whipped Cream Pudding.. 150 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 



Suggestions 168 

Berry Sauce 170 

Brown Sugar Sauce 168 

Caramel Sauce 170 

Cold Cream Sauce 169 

Cold Fruit Sauce 170 

Cold Hard Sauce 169 

Custard Sauce 169 

Egg Sauce 170 

Hot Fruit Sauce 170 



Jelly Sauce 170 

Molasses Sauce 169 

Plain Sauce 168 

Sauce 171 

Sauce for Puddings 168 

Spiced Sauce 171 

Sugar Sirup Sauce 168 

Sugar Sauce 171 

"Whipped Cream Sauce 169 



PANCAKES, FRITTERS, AND SHORTCAKES. 



Suggestions 172 

Cream for Shortcake 175 

Fritters (No. 1) 173 



Fritters (No. 2) 173 

Fruit Fritters 174 

Jelly or Preserve Pancakes 173 



INDEX. 



295 



Pancakes (No. 1) 172 

Pancakes (No. 2) 173 



Peach Shortcake 174 

Shortcake 174 



CAKES. 



Suggestions 176 

Almond Macaroons 211 

Ammonia Tea Cakes 207 

Angel Food (No. 1) 199 

Angel Food (No. 2) 200 

Apple Fruit Cake 196 

Baking Powder 177 

Beautiful White Cake .... 181 

Black Cake 190 

Black Mammy's Ginger 

Cakes> 205 

Bride's Cake 185 

Buttermilk Cake 186 

Cheap Cake 185 

Chess Cakes (No. 1) 210 

Chess Cakes (No. 2) 210 

Chess Cakes (No. 3) 210 

Chess Cakes (No. 4) 211 

Chess Cakes (No. 5) 211 

Chocolate Cake (No. 1) .. . 190 
Chocolate Cake (No. 2) . . . 191 
Cocoanut Layer Cake .. . . . 186 

Cornstarch Cake 184 

Cornstarch Snow Cake 184 

Cup Cake (No. 1) 187 

Cup Cake (No. 2) 187 

Dinner Cake 188 

Doughnuts (No. 1 ) 208 

Doughnuts (No. 2) 208 

Fruit Cake No. 1 194 

Fruit Cake (No. 2) 194 

Fruit Cake (No. 3) 195 

Fruit Roll Cookies 208 

Ginger Bread 204 

Ginger Snaps (No. 1) 205 



Ginger Snaps (No. 2) 205 

Gold Cake (No. 1) 189 

Gold Cake (No. 2) 190 

Gold Layer Cake 186 

Good Cake (No. 1) 181 

Good Cake (No. 2) 182 

Good Cup Cake 187 

Heart's-ease Cake 182 

Ice Cream Cake 184 

Improved Angel Cake 200 

Improved Sponge Cake . . . 201 
Improved Sunshine Cake. 200 

Jam Cake (No. 1) 199 

Jam Cake (No. 2) 199 

Lemon Cake (No. 1) 193 

Lemon Cake (No. 2) 194 

Marble Cake 192 

Marshmallo w Cake 183 

Neapolitan Cake 183 

Nondescripts 209 

Nut Cake (No. 1) 197 

Nut Cake (No. 2) 198 

Nut Cake (No.3) 198 

Nye Cake 188 

Old-fashioned Poundcake 

(No. 1) 188 

Old-fashioned Poundcake 

(No. 2) 189 

Orange Cake 193 

Pearl Cake 185 

Ribbon Cake .'. 191 

Rich Cup Cake 188 

Roll Jelly Cake 209 

Silver Layer Cake 186 

Soft Ginger Bread 203 



296 



TENNESSEE MODEL EOUSEEOLD GUIDE, 



Soft Ginger Cake 204 

Spanish Bunn Cake , 197 

Spice Cake (No. 1) 196 

Spice Cake (No. 2) 196 

Sponge Blocks 203 

Sponge Cake (No. 1) 202 

Sponge Cake (No. 2) 202 

Table for Cooking Cakes. . . 176 

Tea Cakes (No. 1) 206 

Tea Cakes (No. 2) 206 

Tea Cakes (No. 3) 206 

Tea Cakes (No. 4) 207 

Tea Cakes (No. 5) 207 

To Beat Eggs 177 

To Clean Currants 177 

To Dry Flour 177 



To Seed Eaisins 177 

Two-egg Sponge Cake 203 

Velvet Sponge Cake (No.l) 201 
Velvet Sponge Cake (No. 2) 202 

Watermelon Cake 192 

White Cake (No. 1) 178 

White Cake (No. 2) 178 

White Cake (No. 3) 178 

White Cake (No. 4) 179 

White Cake (No. 5) 179 

White Cake (No. 6) 179 

White Cake (No. 7) 180 

White Cake (No. 8) 180 

White Fruit Cake 196 

White Layer Cake 180 

White Sponge Cake 201 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 



Suggestions 212 

Almond Filling 221 

Ambrosia Filling 215 

Apple Filling 220 

Banana Filling 220 

Boiled Icing (No. 1) 212 

Boiled Icing No. 2) 213 

Boiled Icing (No. 3) 213 

Boiled Icing (No. 4). ...... 213 

Boiled Icing (No. 5) 213 

Boiled Icing (No. 6) 214 

Caramel Filling (No. 1)... 215 
Caramel Filling (No. 2)... 216 
Caramel Filling (No. 3)... 216 
Caramel Filling (No. 4). . . 216 
Chocolate Filling No. 1) .. . 216 
Chocolate Filling (No. 2.).. 217 
Chocolate Filling (No. 3). . 217 
Chocolate Filling (No. 4). . 217 
Cocoanut Filling (No. 1).. . 219 



Cocoanut Filling (No. 2) . . 219 

Cocoanut Filling (No. 3) . . 219 

Cream Filling (No. 1) 218 

Cream Filling (No. 2) 218 

Fig Filling 220 

Filling for Ice Cream Cake 214 

Frosting 217 

Fruit Filling 220 

Gelatin Icing 218 

Golden Frosting 218 

Ice Cream Icing 215 

Icing 212 

Icing without Eggs 214 

Lemon Cream Filling 215 

Lemon Icing 220 

Lemon Jelly Filling 220 

Marshmallow Filling 214 

Milk Filling (No. 1) 218 

Milk Filling (No. 2) 219 

Mixed Filling (No. 1) 221 



INDEX. 



^97 



Mixed Filling (No. 2) 221 

Nut Filling 221 

Nut Frosting 221 

Orange Filling 219 



Orange Icing 219 

Sour Cream Filling 218 

Tutti Frutti Icing 220 



DESSERTS. 



Suggestions 222 

Ambrosia 230 

Apricot Jelly 231 

Apple Snow 233 

Baked Custard 223 

Baked Quinces 234 

Bisque Glace 228 

Blanc-mange 226 

Boiled Custard (No. 1) . . . . 223 
Boiled Custard (No. 2) . . . . 223 

Charlotte 224 

Charlotte Russe (No. 1) .. . 224 
Charlotte Russe (No. 2) .. . 224 
Charlotte Russe (No. 3).. . 225 
Charlotte Russe (No. 4) .. . 225 
Charlotte Russe (No. 5) .. . 225 

Cherry Delight 230 

Chocolate Cream 227 

Cranberry Puffs 234 

Cream Pie 228 

Cream for Fruit 222 

Delicate Dessert 229 



Frozen Mous-se 229 

Frozen Pudding 229 

Fruit Cups 234 

Fruit Salad 232 

Fruit Sponge 232 

Gelatin Jelly 230 

Jellied Apples 233 

Orange Jelly 231 

Peach Cream 227 

Prune Shape 232 

Rasin or Currant Puffs 235 

Raspberry Blanc-mange. . . 226 

Russian Cream 227 

Salted Almonds (No. 1) . . . 235 
Salted Almonds (No. 2). . . 235 

Snow Custard 224 

Spanish Cream 226 

Stewed Apples 233 

Stewed Pears 234 

To Whip Cream 222 

Transparent Pudding 228 

Tutti Frutti Jelly 230 



Suggestions 

Apricot Sherbert 

Berry Ice Cream 

Berry Sherbert 

Cheny Ice 

Chocolate Ice Cream 

Custard Ice Cream (No. 1) 
Custard Ice Cream (No. 2) 
Fruit Ice Cream 



ICES. 

236 Lemon Ice 242 

240 Lemon Sherbert (No. 1)... 240 
239 Lemon Sherbert (No. 2) . . 240 

241 Orange Sherbert 241 

242 Peach Ice Cream 238 

238 Pineapple Ice Cream 238 

237 Pine Apple Sherbert 241 

237 Pure Ice Cream 236 

238 Sherbert (No. 1) 239 



298 



TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE. 



Sherbert (No. 2) 239 

Sherbert (No. 3) 240 

Strawberry Ice 242 

Strawberry Sherbert 242 



Vanilla Ice Cream (No. 1). 236 
Vanilla Ice Cream (No. 2) . 237 
Vanilla Ice Cream (No. 3) . 237 



DRINKS. 



Suggestions 243 

Boiled Coffee (No. 1) 243 

Boiled Coffee (No. 2) 244 

Chocolate 245 

Cocoa. . 245 

Cream Soda 246 

Filtered or Drip Coffee. ... 244 

Good Coffee 244 

Grape Juice 248 

Ice Tea 245 

Lemon Soda 245 

Lemonade 245 



Pineapple Ice 248 

Pineapple Royal 248 

Raspberry Shrub 247 

Raspberry Vinegar (No. 1). 246 
Raspberry Vinegar (No. 2). 246 

Strawberry Acid 247 

Strawberry Ice 249 

Substitute for Cream in 

Coffee 243 

Tea 244 

Unfermented Wine (No. 1). 247 
Unfermented Wine (No. 2). 248 



CANNED FRUITS. 



Suggestions 250 

Canned Apples 251 

Canned Berries 251 

Canned Fruit Juices 252 

Canned Peaches 250 



Canned Pears 250 

Canned Plums 251 

Canned Quinces 251 

Canning Fruit 252 



PRESERVES AND JEEI.IES. 



Suggestions 253 

Apple Butter 255 

Apple Jelly 258 

Apple Preserves 255 

Blackberry Jam 257 

Cherry Preserves 256 

East India Preserves 256 

Fruit Jellies 258 

Jam 257 

Orange Marmalade 258 

Peach Preserves (No. 1) . . . 253 



Peach Preserves (No. 2) . . . 254 

Plum Preserves 254 

Preserves 254 

Quince Preserves 255 

Strawberry Preserves (No. 

1) 256 

Strawberry Preserves (No. 

2) \ 257 

To Remove Jelly from 

Molds 253 

Watermelon Preserves 257 



INDEX. 



299 



CANDIES. 



Suggestions 260 

Butterscotch (No. 1.) 265 

Butter Scotch (No. 2) 266 

Chocolate Caramels 265 

Chocolate Coating 261 

Cocoanut Candy ... 262 

Cocoanut Caramels 265 

Cocoanut Creams 262 

Cocoanut Drops 267 

Cream Caramels 264 

Crystallized Fruits 267 

French Cream 260 



PAGE 

Fruit and Nut Creams 262 

Hard Nut Candy 262 

Hickory Nut Caramels 265 

Homemade Candy 264 

Homemade Maple Sirup. . 268 

Marshmallows 266 

Mint Drops 266 

Molasses Candy (No. 1). . . 263 
Molasses Candy (No. 2). . . 263 

Peach Leather 267 

Sugar Candy 263 

Uncooked Cream 261 



DIET FOR THE SICK. 



Suggestions 269 

Batter Cakes 269 

Beef Tea 269 

Beefsteak 269 

Blackberry Cordial 273 

Boiled Rice 271 

Broth 270 

Cup Pudding 271 

Dried Flour 272 

Dry Toast 270 

HEAI^TH RUI.es 

A Cold 276 

Alphabetical Acrostic 274 

Antidote for Poison 279 

Before Going to Dentist . . . 279 

Bleeding Cuts 277 

Broken Limbs 278 

Bruises 276 

Burns 276 

Cold Sores 278 

Croup 277 

Dysentery 278 



Flaxseed Lemonade 272 

Gruel 270 

Jelly Water 272 

Lime Water 271 

Milk Toast 270 

Panada 270 

Rice Water 272 

Slippery Elm Bark Tea . . . 272 
Wafers 271 

AND REMEDIES. 

Dyspepsia 275 

Earache 278 

Face Wash 279 

Fever 278 

Flux 277 

Hemorrhages 277 

Hiccough 277 

Hoarseness 276 

In Sewing 278 

Inflammatory Troubles . . . 278 
Ivy Poison 278 



300 



TENNESSEE MODEL HOUSEHOLD GUIDE, 



Night Sweats 276 

Oatmeal Wash for Face. . . 279 

Pains in Stomach 276 

Pains in the Side 278 

Eingworms 277 

Rules 275 

Severed Artery 278 

Sick Headache 276 



Sick Stomach 276 

Sore Throat 276 

Sprained Ankle 277 

Stings of Insects 276 

Tickling in Throat 276 

Toothache 276 

Whooping Cough 277 



USBFUI. AND SUGGESTIVE. 



Suggestions 280 

Ammonia 280 

Bedbug Poison 285 

Borax 281 

Clean Bottles 281 

Clean Carpets 285 

Clean Chamber Vessels... 284 

Clean Copper Ware 281 

Clean Jewelry 286 

Clean Knives 283 

Clean Marble 282 

Clean New Kettles 282 

Clean Pans and Kettles . . . 281 

Clean Piano Keys 284 

Clean Refrigerators 284 

Clean Rusty Flatirons 283 

Clean Silver 285 

Clean Straw Hats 283 

Clean Windows in Cold 

Weather 285 

Clear Mica in Stoves 282 

Disinfectant for Kitchen 

Sink 282 

Drive Away Red Ants. ... 282 

Drive Vermin Away 285 

Freshen Feather Beds and 

Pillows 284 

Hot Air Passages in Stoves 284 



Improve Soiled Willow 
Chairs or Baskets.... 283 

Keep Meat Sweet 283 

Make Starch 284 

Purify Cistern Water 283 

Remedy Scorched Food. . . 281 
Remove Egg Stains from 

Silver 284 

Remove Iron Rust 283 

Remove Odor of Onions 

from the Hands 282 

Remove Paint from Win- 
dow Glass 282 

Remove Stains from Hands 281 

Remove Tar 282 

Remove Tops of Fruit Jars 
That Cannot Be Started 

by Hand 281 

Remove White Spots on 

Furniture 283 

Set Color in Wash Goods. . 285 

Settle Coffee 281 

Soap 280 

Soften Hard Water 282 

To Soften Shoes 286 

Wash Blankets 284 

Whiten Garments 284 

Whiten Stone Hearths or 
Steps 283 



TJhe SBc Jjf, Siief ^eweiry Co,, 



DEALERS IN 



^i 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY. 

Sterling Silver, Gold Head Canes, Umbrellas, Fine China. Cut Glass, Clocks, Fine 

Lamps, Leather Goods, Onyx Top Tables and Cabinets, Plated 

Ware, Art Pottery, Gold Pens, Pencils, etc. 



Repairing of Fine Watches and Jewelry a Specialty. Souvenir Spoons 

208 and 210 Union Street, 
WllTCHES. NASHVILLE, TENN. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

PATEK, PHILIPPE* CO., 
VACHERON AND CONSTANTIN 



JUNGERMAN 6c CO., 



J. Jungerman, 
J. U. Rust. 



" PPP " Flour the Choicest for 
Pastries, Biscuits, and Bread. -=5^ 






403 Public Square, 




NASHVILLE, TENN. ■^€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€e- 



ARTISTIC PIANOS AND ORGANS, 



%M 9 \»i m m m m ' ww ^ f 



I ■ w I 



Cash or Easy 
Payments, 



D. H. BALDWIN 6c CO., 

517 Church Street, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Wi-ite for Catalogue and Price List. 



R. BORGIVIS iSt Co., 




Manufacturers of 



Umbrellas, 

Parasols, 

€anc$. 

Hermitage and Battlefield Canes, and War Relics, 

Kecoveiing and Repairing 
neatly and promptly done. 

222 N. Summer St., NflSflVILLE, TEHN. 



W. G. THUSS, 
A. J. THUSS. 



Telephone 849. 



UA 



UC^^i 



RhotograpHers, 

230 N. Cherry Street, McGavock Block, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



THE OCEKN 



IS THE BEST 



IN THE CITY. 




m^m^^-^m^mmmmmmmmmm^mmmm-^'^^^mmmm 



^jUousekeeperSy Attention/ | 



We kve the most Cin VFQ #) R A NRF9 ^^^ ™^ ^^ ^^^' 
complete stock of lU ■ Ci'^^ ^ llHiiuLO gas or gasoline. 



CHINA, 

CROCKERY, and 
GLASSWARE, 
LAMPS and 
LAMP GOODS, 



#> 



CUT GLASS and 
BRICxAxBRAC, 
TABLE CUTLERY, 
WOODEN and 
WILLOW WARE, 



in short, we have every necessary and convenience for 
Kitchen, Dining Room, Laundry, and Dairy to.be 
found under one roof in the country. 

Come and see us before placing your orders. 

No trouble to reply to correspondence, show goods, or 
answer questions. 






# 




I ^Phillips & :^uttorff97ffff. Co. 



i€€€€€€€€€€€€#€:€^ 



7?furraj/, ^Dibreii d Co., 1? 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Following is an extract taken from the Boston Shoe and 
Leather Eeporter of January 9, 1896: 

NASHVILLE SHOE TRADE. 

Among all the jobbing markets of the country none has held up better 
than Nashville, Tenn. Notwithstanding the great depression existing 
throughout all sections during the early half of 1895, the trade of Tennes- 
see's capital city was well maintained, and compared favorably with that of 
former years in volume, as will be seen from shipments of various houses, 
which are compiled from our files of 1895. Nashville has long been a large 
distributor of boots and shoes, having led the entire South, where there are 
so many excellent markets, for many years, St. Louis alone excepted. In 
fact, only a very few cities North or South dispose of more boots and shoes, 
year after year, than do the dealers of Nashville. And of this fact they may 
be justly proud. Their trade covers a large territory, extending from the 
Ohio Rivef to the Gulf of Mexico, and from the Virginia line to Arkansas 
and Texas. 

Shipments to the various houses during 1895 amounted to 102,354 cases, 
distributed as follows: 

CASES. 

MURRAY, DIBRELL & CO 26,002 

§ Herman Bros., Lindauer & Co 17,733 

Richardson Bros. & Co 14,160 

Hollins Sons & Co , 13,225 

..A.. Throne-Franklin Shoe Co 9,721 

W Manier & Co 8,016 

^0^ Carter, Dunbar & Co. . 6,562 

^i\'a Brown, Kornman & Co 2,592 

W Retail dealers 4,349 

'01^ ^^^^^ ^^^'^V^ 





If you wish the receipts in this 
book to be successful, telephone 

jffall & Viforrisonj 

.^ rsjf^^ 11QO, for the C O A I ^^ 

They will supply you with ^ office: 

anything for the stove or grate, $% 215 North Cherry Street. 

li you want a strictly first-'class, up to date PIANO at a f ea'' 
sonable price and upon liberal terms of payment, do not 
fail to call at our warerooms or correspond with us and 
get posted in regard to the popular ^^^^^y^/'x^y 

©OB(£OB©iQ^5tarr Piai^o, 

which is fully guaranteed and indorsed as a fine -tone, durable instrument. 
We also have a large stock of other reliable makes of PIANOS and ORGANS, 
which we are offering at close prices. Give us a call and be convinced. 

JESSE FRENCH PIANO AND ORGAN CO., 

Nos. 240 and 242 North Summer Street, 
FRANK B. OWINQS, Manager. NASHVILLE, TENN. 

STBWART KlRKZPATRIdC, 

RETAIL DEAUMR IN 

Slices, Valises, ar^d Un^brellas, 

Corner Cherry and Union Street5, 

-!■■ rn^nrifir tenn. 

F. O. BEAZUBV, 

DEALER IN 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, 

321 Union Street, 
Telephone 330. NASHVILLE, TENN. 



THE MORTON-SCOTT-ROBERTSON CO., 
J'urniturQj CarpetSj 9/fattin^Sj Oilcloths^ 

LACE CURTAINS AND WINDOW SHADES. 



215 North Summer Street, 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Omas. S. Kiivkibao & Co, 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 



f^auier ^ovm Sieves. 

229 Nortli Summer Street. 
Cf-IAS. S. KlIVICHAD ^ Co, 




n 



The Celebrated Railroad 
Ready-mixed Taint. 



\ mfsps. of ana Dealers In \ 



Office and Salesroom 
200-202 N. College. . ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ < Paints Of All KlfldS, 

Factory: ^ • ^-^ 

112 N. College. \ ^l/arrQU ^ros, \ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^' 

nashm,l.l.e: tknn ' t Painters' Decorators' and j BullderS' Material. 

NASHV1L.UE, TENN^^^ Artists' Supplies. \" ^ ^ ^ 



O. B. f-iORrV «St COo, 



7/25:7 



Sboe0 anb 

206 Union St.. near Market, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



^m 






North Summer St. 



NASHVILLE, TENN, 



Complete Stock of Art Embroidery, Lace, Gloves, 
Hosiei-y, Corsets, Handl:erchief9,Wliite Goods, Em- 
broideries, Ribbons, Buys' Ciotliing, Notions, and 
Faucy Goods. Mail Orders Solicited. 



WARREN, NEELY & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 

Proprietors of Eclipse Manufactur- 
ing Co., Manufacturers of Jeans and 
Staple Clothing, Overalls, Shirts and 
Drawers. NASHVILLE, TE^N. 



CALL^^ C. K. A. GERDING'S 

ICE CREAM PARLORS, 

Manufacturers of Ice Cream and Ices, 

415-417 Union St., Nashville, Tenn. 

An Elegant Hot Lunch Served. Phone 201. 



;<if tfkl^ m.^4 HasWH® f% 



y7?\^y/i'^y/)'\^y7?^ 



'w ^w ^ w •^^^ » ,^ wHi. w Mw». ■ iin K ■ Fixtures a Specialty, 



mu'« »' H'w* ' w i p i ^iip ^m V w * Mi l > t I P 

DeskSf Counters, 
Church Pews, 

Factory and Mills: 
Corner Main and First Streets, 



Book Cases, 



Hafd/'wood Mantels, 'I ? 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 




u/you buy i/our Sroceries from 




Orrj Jri/me dc Co.j 



Wholesale 
Grocers, 



NASHVILLE, TENN., 

2/ou will be ^11 !7^iyht. 



W. A. WRAV, 

Eaaus' ana Gents' Custom Ittaae Boots ana Sftoes, 

TRUNKS, VALISES, UMBRELLAS, ETC. 

228 North Cherry St., bet. Church and Union, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

S'ine 7/^erchant TJailorinff 

AT REASONABLE PRICES AT '^l^' 

Phone 316. ' 

^38 N. Summer St., Nashville, Tenn. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

Necflles, Oil, and Attachments for All 
Phone 1292. -^n^^ Machines. Birds,Bicycles, and Supplies. 

Repairing of All Kinds GOLD, SILVER, NICKEL, AND COPPER PLATINQ. 

244 N. Summer Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



m^ 




Ifeatly Done. 



HfeS 89 -li 



^ 



r 4 f 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, 
a: X 

2 cups of sugar equal 1 pound, 

2 cups of soft butter equal 1 pound, 

4 cups of sifted flour equal 1 pound, 

10 eggs equal 1 pound, 

1 pint of granulated sugar equals 1 pound, 

1 quart of sifted flour equals 1 pound, 

1 pint of finely ^chopped meat equals 1 pound, 
4 tablespoonfuls equal 1 liquid tablespoonful, 
4 tablespoonfuls equal % cup or % gill* 

j4 cup equals 1 gill, 

2 cups equal 1 pint, 

2 pints equal 1 quart, 

4 quarts equal 1 gallon, 

1 tablespoonful of salt equals 1 ounce, 

4 teaspoonfuls of salt equall ounce, 

1 tablespoonful of soft butter equals I ounce, 

2 tablespoonfuls of liquid equal one ounce. 
16 ounces equal 1 poutid or 1 pint of liquid, 

A set ^of measures from one gallon to a half 
gill will be found very useful in every kitchen. 












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HECKMAN L 

BINDERY INC. V 

.^ MAY 89 



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